Hillsborough County
Manchester skyline
Manchester skyline
Official seal of Hillsborough County
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Hillsborough County
Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire
New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°53′44″N 71°34′58″W / 42.895584°N 71.582741°W / 42.895584; -71.582741
Country United States
State New Hampshire
Founded1769
Named forThe Earl of Hillsborough
SeatManchester and Nashua
Largest cityManchester (by population)
Weare (by area)
Area
 • Total892.5 sq mi (2,312 km2)
 • Land876.5 sq mi (2,270 km2)
 • Water15.9 sq mi (41 km2)  1.8%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total422,937
 • Density470/sq mi (180/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts1st, 2nd
Websitehcnh.org

Hillsborough County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2020 census, the population was 422,937, almost one-third the population of the entire state.[1] Its county seats are Manchester and Nashua, the state's two biggest cities. Hillsborough is northern New England's most populous county as well as its most densely populated.

Hillsborough County comprises the Manchester-Nashua, NH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

History

Hillsborough was one of the five original counties identified for New Hampshire in 1769, and was named for Wills Hill, 1st Earl of Hillsborough, who was British Secretary of State for the Colonies at the time. The county was formally organized at Amherst on March 19, 1771.

In 1823, twelve townships of Hillsborough Country – Andover, Boscawen, Bradford, Dunbarton, Fishersfield (now Newbury), Henniker, Hooksett, Hopkinton, New London, Salisbury, Sutton, and Warner – became part of Merrimack County. The town of Merrimack along the Merrimack River in south-central Hillsborough County was not included in the newly formed county 9 miles (14 km) to the north. Hillsborough County's administrative functions were moved from Amherst to Milford in 1866, and then to the current seats of Manchester and Nashua in 1869.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 892 square miles (2,310 km2), of which 876 square miles (2,270 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) (1.8%) is water.[2] The highest point in Hillsborough county is Pack Monadnock Mountain at 2,290 feet (700 m).

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Politics and government

2020 presidential election by voting ward in Hillsborough County
2020 presidential election by voting ward in Hillsborough County

In the 2012 presidential election, Time had listed Hillsborough as one of five critical counties affecting the outcome in the swing state of New Hampshire. Obama ended up winning with a margin of 50%–49%.[3] Despite its more urban nature, Hillsborough County has historically been a more Republican leaning part of the state, although there is evidence to suggest that is changing. In 2020, Joe Biden and Jeanne Shaheen won Hillsborough County by a wider margin than they won statewide by.[4] Biden also received the highest percentage of the vote for a Democrat since Lyndon Johnson's 1964 landslide, largely driven due to large swings to Democrats in the county's historically Republican suburban communities.[1]

United States presidential election results for Hillsborough County, New Hampshire[5]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 104,625 45.16% 122,344 52.81% 4,690 2.02%
2016 100,013 46.70% 99,589 46.50% 14,555 6.80%
2012 99,991 48.62% 102,303 49.74% 3,373 1.64%
2008 97,178 47.47% 104,820 51.20% 2,711 1.32%
2004 99,724 51.03% 94,121 48.16% 1,582 0.81%
2000 80,649 48.65% 77,625 46.83% 7,487 4.52%
1996 59,441 40.54% 71,282 48.61% 15,912 10.85%
1992 61,620 39.04% 58,470 37.04% 37,750 23.92%
1988 88,261 65.00% 45,799 33.73% 1,718 1.27%
1984 81,462 70.68% 33,314 28.91% 475 0.41%
1980 68,994 59.84% 31,789 27.57% 14,521 12.59%
1976 53,581 53.11% 45,544 45.15% 1,755 1.74%
1972 65,274 64.39% 34,739 34.27% 1,364 1.35%
1968 42,409 46.01% 45,423 49.28% 4,337 4.71%
1964 29,503 32.88% 60,236 67.12% 0 0.00%
1960 38,430 42.43% 52,135 57.57% 0 0.00%
1956 45,248 55.50% 36,234 44.44% 46 0.06%
1952 41,263 49.68% 41,802 50.32% 0 0.00%
1948 28,257 39.94% 41,789 59.07% 696 0.98%
1944 25,921 37.99% 42,306 62.00% 9 0.01%
1940 26,201 38.09% 42,580 61.91% 0 0.00%
1936 23,293 38.07% 34,992 57.20% 2,895 4.73%
1932 23,308 41.50% 32,458 57.79% 395 0.70%
1928 24,465 45.23% 29,457 54.46% 165 0.31%
1924 22,098 51.66% 16,002 37.41% 4,673 10.93%
1920 23,040 54.44% 18,736 44.27% 546 1.29%
1916 9,927 46.33% 10,939 51.05% 562 2.62%
1912 8,007 35.92% 8,909 39.96% 5,378 24.12%
1908 12,568 57.29% 8,701 39.66% 669 3.05%
1904 12,603 57.54% 8,831 40.32% 470 2.15%
1900 12,653 58.76% 8,339 38.72% 543 2.52%
1896 13,080 67.80% 4,965 25.73% 1,248 6.47%
1892 9,875 52.08% 8,785 46.33% 303 1.60%
1888 9,460 52.08% 8,439 46.45% 267 1.47%
1884 8,540 53.31% 7,075 44.17% 404 2.52%
1880 8,689 55.10% 7,001 44.39% 80 0.51%
1876 8,190 54.57% 6,790 45.24% 29 0.19%


County Commission

The executive power of Hillsborough County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county.

District Commissioner Hometown Party
1 Toni Pappas Manchester Republican
2 Michael Soucy Nashua Republican
3 Robert Rowe Amherst Republican

In addition to the county commission, there are five directly elected officials; they include county attorney, register of deeds, county sheriff, register of probate, and county treasurer.[6]

Office Name
County Attorney John Coughlin (R)
Register of Deeds Mary Ann Crowell (D)
County Sheriff Christopher Connelly (R)
Register of Probate Elizabeth Ann Moreau (R)
County Treasurer David Fredette (R)

[7]

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Hillsborough County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of 2021 there are 122 members from 45 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
Democratic Party 66 54.1%
Republican Party 56 45.9%
Total 122 100%

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179032,883
180043,89933.5%
181049,24912.2%
182053,8849.4%
183037,724−30.0%
184042,49412.6%
185057,47835.3%
186062,1408.1%
187064,2383.4%
188075,63417.7%
189093,24723.3%
1900112,64020.8%
1910126,07211.9%
1920135,5127.5%
1930140,1653.4%
1940144,8883.4%
1950156,9878.4%
1960178,16113.5%
1970223,94125.7%
1980276,60823.5%
1990336,07321.5%
2000380,84113.3%
2010400,7215.2%
2020422,9375.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2018[12]
2020 American Community Survey Population Estimates, Race and Hispanic Origin[13]
Race Percentage
White, not Hispanic or Latino 83%
Asian 6%
Hispanic or Latino 8%
Black or African American 3%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 422,937 people residing in the county.[1] The population density was 482.8 inhabitants per square mile (186.4/km2).

The racial makeup of the county was 81.0% white, 4.8% Asian, 3.9% black or African American, 1.7% American Indian, 2.1% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 8% of the population.[14]

For the period 2011–2015, 24.8% of the county's population had French ancestry (including 9.9% of the total population with French Canadian ancestry), 20.9% had Irish, 13.1% had English, 10.2% had Italian, and 8.2% had German ancestry.[15] For the same time period, the estimated median annual income for a household in the county was $71,244, and the median income for a family was $85,966. Male full-time workers had a median income of $60,349 versus $44,270 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,242. About 5.8% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.7% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

Former towns

Education

School districts include:[17]

K-12 districts:

Secondary districts:

Elementary districts:

Previously Bedford sent high school students to the Manchester School District.[18]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Bureau, US Census. "2020 Population and Housing State Data". The United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 14, 2021.
  2. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  3. ^ "The White House – Obama's Path to Victory", Time, pp. 16–17, November 19, 2012
  4. ^ "NH-SOS – 2020". sos.nh.gov. Retrieved July 26, 2021.
  5. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  6. ^ Hillsborough County > Departments
  7. ^ "General Election Winners – 11/03/2020" (PDF). New Hampshire Secretary of State's Office. November 11, 2020. Retrieved December 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  12. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 26, 2013. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  13. ^ "U.S Census Bureau QuickFacts".((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2011–2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2017.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2011–2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2017.
  17. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Hillsborough County, NH" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list
  18. ^ "Bedford withdrawal from West approved". New Hampshire Union Leader. Manchester, NH: B1CI. January 10, 2006.

Coordinates: 42°55′N 71°43′W / 42.92°N 71.72°W / 42.92; -71.72