Anson County
County of Anson
Anson County Courthouse in Wadesboro
Anson County Courthouse in Wadesboro
Flag of Anson County
Official seal of Anson County
Official logo of Anson County
Motto(s): 
"A great place to call home"
Map of North Carolina highlighting Anson County
Location within the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°58′N 80°06′W / 34.97°N 80.10°W / 34.97; -80.10Coordinates: 34°58′N 80°06′W / 34.97°N 80.10°W / 34.97; -80.10
Country United States
State North Carolina
Founded1750
Named forGeorge Anson, Baron Anson
SeatWadesboro
Largest townWadesboro
Area
 • Total537 sq mi (1,390 km2)
 • Land531 sq mi (1,380 km2)
 • Water5.6 sq mi (15 km2)  1.1%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2021)
22,060
 • Density41.5/sq mi (16.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitewww.co.anson.nc.us

Anson County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 22,055.[1] Its county seat is Wadesboro.[2]

History

The county was formed in 1750 from Bladen County. It was named for George Anson, Baron Anson, a British admiral, who circumnavigated the globe from 1740 to 1744, and later became First Lord of the Admiralty. Anson purchased land in the state.[3]

Like its parent county Bladen being occupied by Native American tribes(Waccamaw people), Anson County was originally occupied by Catawba Siouan tribe as a vast territory with indefinite northern and western boundaries. Reductions in its extent began in 1753, when the northern part of it became Rowan County. In 1762 the western part of Anson County became Mecklenburg County. In 1779 the northern part of what remained of Anson County became Montgomery County, and the part east of the Pee Dee River became Richmond County. Finally, in 1842 the western part of Anson County was combined with the southeastern part of Mecklenburg County to become Union County.[4]

Geography

Interactive map of Anson County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 537 square miles (1,390 km2), of which 531 square miles (1,380 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (1.1%) is water.[5]

National protected area

State and local protected areas/sites

Major water bodies

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Major infrastructure

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17905,133
18008,14658.7%
18108,8318.4%
182012,53441.9%
183014,09512.5%
184015,0777.0%
185013,489−10.5%
186013,6641.3%
187012,428−9.0%
188017,99444.8%
189020,02711.3%
190021,8709.2%
191025,46516.4%
192028,33411.3%
193029,3493.6%
194028,443−3.1%
195026,781−5.8%
196024,962−6.8%
197023,488−5.9%
198025,6499.2%
199023,474−8.5%
200025,2757.7%
201026,9486.6%
202022,055−18.2%
2021 (est.)22,060[9]0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2014[14]
2020[15]

2020 census

Anson County racial composition[16]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 10,593 48.03%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 9,838 44.61%
Native American 89 0.4%
Asian 221 1.0%
Pacific Islander 4 0.02%
Other/Mixed 645 2.92%
Hispanic or Latino 665 3.02%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 22,055 people, 9,521 households, and 5,809 families residing in the county.

2010 census

In the 2010 Census, there were 26,948 people. The racial makeup of the county was 48.58% African American, 47.15% White American, 1.07% Asian, 0.61% Native American, 1.25% multiracial and 1.32% of other race. People of Hispanic and Latino origin account for 3.02% of the population.[17]

2000 census

As of the census[18] of 2000, there were 25,275 people, 9,204 households, and 6,663 families residing in the county. The population density was 48 people per square mile (18/km2). There were 10,221 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 51.64% Black or African American, 48.53% White, 0.45% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,204 households, out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.80% were married couples living together, 19.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.60% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.20% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,849, and the median income for a family was $35,870. Males had a median income of $27,297 versus $20,537 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,853. About 15.50% of families and 17.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.90% of those under age 18 and 16.70% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics

Anson County is a member of the regional Centralina Council of Governments.[19]

United States presidential election results for Anson County, North Carolina[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,321 47.53% 5,789 51.72% 84 0.75%
2016 4,506 42.73% 5,859 55.56% 180 1.71%
2012 4,166 37.01% 7,019 62.36% 71 0.63%
2008 4,207 39.20% 6,456 60.15% 70 0.65%
2004 3,796 41.15% 5,413 58.68% 16 0.17%
2000 3,161 39.59% 4,792 60.01% 32 0.40%
1996 2,193 28.81% 4,890 64.23% 530 6.96%
1992 2,334 27.33% 5,269 61.71% 936 10.96%
1988 2,782 36.45% 4,831 63.29% 20 0.26%
1984 3,719 42.45% 5,015 57.25% 26 0.30%
1980 1,968 27.77% 4,973 70.17% 146 2.06%
1976 1,608 25.04% 4,796 74.68% 18 0.28%
1972 3,551 60.88% 2,188 37.51% 94 1.61%
1968 1,474 18.39% 2,969 37.05% 3,571 44.56%
1964 1,721 29.34% 4,144 70.66% 0 0.00%
1960 1,597 27.93% 4,120 72.07% 0 0.00%
1956 1,640 31.31% 3,598 68.69% 0 0.00%
1952 1,843 30.79% 4,143 69.21% 0 0.00%
1948 447 12.05% 2,692 72.54% 572 15.41%
1944 510 12.46% 3,582 87.54% 0 0.00%
1940 371 7.54% 4,552 92.46% 0 0.00%
1936 381 7.60% 4,629 92.40% 0 0.00%
1932 223 4.98% 4,252 94.91% 5 0.11%
1928 726 19.77% 2,947 80.23% 0 0.00%
1924 225 8.58% 2,372 90.47% 25 0.95%
1920 433 12.00% 3,175 88.00% 0 0.00%
1916 301 12.82% 2,046 87.18% 0 0.00%
1912 125 7.23% 1,487 85.95% 118 6.82%


Education

There are 11 schools in the Anson County Schools system that serve the students of the county.[21]

South Piedmont Community College has a campus on Highway 74 near Polkton that serves Anson County residents.

Communities

Pee Dee National Wildlife RefugeAnsonvilleLilesvilleMcFarlanMorvenPeachlandPolktonWadesboro
Clickable map of Anson County, North Carolina With Municipal labels (interactive map)

Towns

Townships

Unincorporated communities

Ghost town

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2021 Estimates of Anson County.[22]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2021 Estimate)
1 Wadesboro Town 5,567
2 Polkton Town 2,654
3 Ansonville Town 666
4 Morven Town 572
5 Lilesville Town 560
6 Peachland Town 409
7 McFarlan Town 133

In popular culture

Steven Spielberg filmed The Color Purple mostly in Lilesville, and a large white farmhouse (the Huntley house, which is located in Lilesville, NC and is an old farmhouse located few miles off Highway 74) was used extensively as the main exterior location in that film.[23][24]

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau Quickfacts: Anson County". U.S. Census Bureau. April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names (PDF). Washington DC: United States Geological Survey. p. 26.
  4. ^ Medley, Mary Louise (1976). Anson County Historical Association (ed.). History of Anson County, North Carolina, 1750-1976. Heritage Printer, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina. ISBN 9780806347554. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  6. ^ "Arrowhead Lake NC Fishing Reports, Map & Hot Spots". www.fishidy.com. Retrieved July 27, 2022.
  7. ^ a b "Gaddy Covered Bridge | Natural Atlas". naturalatlas.com. Retrieved July 27, 2022.
  8. ^ "NCWRC Game Lands". www.ncpaws.org. Retrieved July 27, 2022.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Anson County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  12. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  14. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Anson County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  16. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 22, 2021.
  17. ^ "2010 Census Population of Anson County, NC". Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  18. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  19. ^ "Centralina Council of Governments". Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  21. ^ "Search for Public School Districts – District Detail for Anson County Schools". National Center for Education Statistics. Institute of Education Sciences. Retrieved December 4, 2012.
  22. ^ "Anson County NC - Cities, Towns, Neighborhoods, & Subdivisions". northcarolina.hometownlocator.com. Retrieved April 30, 2022.
  23. ^ "The Color Purple House". Old House Dreams. September 10, 2010. Retrieved May 23, 2022.
  24. ^ Sharma, Dhruv (May 12, 2020). "Where Was The Color Purple Filmed?". The Cinemaholic. Retrieved May 23, 2022.
  25. ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963.