Craven County
County of Craven
New Bern City Hall
Flag of Craven County
Official seal of Craven County
Official logo of Craven County
Map of North Carolina highlighting Craven County
Location within the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°06′33″N 77°04′09″W / 35.109166666667°N 77.069166666667°W / 35.109166666667; -77.069166666667
Country United States
State North Carolina
Founded1712
Named forWilliam, Earl of Craven
SeatNew Bern
Largest cityNew Bern
Area
 • Total774 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Land709 sq mi (1,840 km2)
 • Water65 sq mi (170 km2)  8.4%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2021)
100,674
 • Density142/sq mi (55/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.cravencounty.com

Craven County is located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 100,720.[1] Its county seat is New Bern.[2] The county was created in 1705 as Archdale Precinct from the now-extinct Bath County. It was renamed Craven Precinct in 1712 and gained county status in 1739.[3][4] It is named for William, Earl of Craven, who lived from 1606 to 1697. Craven County is part of the New Bern, NC, Metropolitan Statistical Area.


History

On August 4, 1661, George Durant purchased land from Cisketando, king of the Yeopim Indian tribe. On March 13, 1662, a second purchase was made from Kilcocanen, another Yeopim. By 1662 Durant was living in Virginia on a tract of land along the Perquimans River which flows into Albemarle Sound, which became part of the Carolina colony in 1665.[5]

Craven County was established in 1712 as Craven Precinct, a precinct of Bath County. It was named after William, Lord Craven, one of the Lords Proprietors. That year Christopher Gale became the first chief justice of North Carolina.[6][7] During the initial years of colonization, the population of Craven County was sparse and grew slowly. By 1740, however, the town of New Bern began growing rapidly and became the seat for the Governorship.[8] John Carter served as the first sheriff of Craven County, but died in 1740 in the line of duty, when ambushed by an outlaw he was trying to apprehend. In 1746 an act was passed establishing New Bern as the capital of the province and, although the act was later repealed, the General Court met at New Bern in Craven County after 1747.[6]

In 1749 James Davis, the colony's first printer, arrived at New Bern and became the official printer for the North Carolina Assembly.[9] In 1751, Davis established and began printing the North-Carolina Gazette, North Carolina's first newspaper.[10] In 1754 he was elected Sheriff of Craven County.[11]

Geography

Interactive map of Craven County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 774 square miles (2,000 km2), of which 709 square miles (1,840 km2) is land and 65 square miles (170 km2) (8.4%) is water.[12]

National protected area

State and local protected areas

Major water bodies

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Major infrastructure

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179010,474
180010,245−2.2%
181012,67623.7%
182013,3945.7%
183013,7342.5%
184013,438−2.2%
185014,7099.5%
186016,26810.6%
187020,51626.1%
188019,729−3.8%
189020,5334.1%
190024,16017.7%
191025,5945.9%
192029,04813.5%
193030,6655.6%
194031,2982.1%
195048,82356.0%
196058,77320.4%
197062,5546.4%
198071,04313.6%
199081,61314.9%
200091,43612.0%
2010103,50513.2%
2020100,720−2.7%
2021 (est.)100,674[13]0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
1790-1960[15] 1900-1990[16]
1990-2000[17] 2010-2013[18]
2020[19]

2020 census

Craven County racial composition[20]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 64,933 64.47%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 19,903 19.76%
Native American 318 0.32%
Asian 3,059 3.04%
Pacific Islander 150 0.15%
Other/Mixed 5,162 5.13%
Hispanic or Latino 7,195 7.14%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 100,720 people, 42,221 households, and 28,502 families residing in the county.

2000 census

As of the census[21] of 2000, there were 91,436 people, 34,582 households, and 25,071 families residing in the county. The population density was 129 people per square mile (50/km2). There were 38,150 housing units at an average density of 54 per square mile (21/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 69.94% White, 25.12% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.99% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.78% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. 4.02% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 34,582 households, out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 12.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.50% were non-families. 23.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.60% under the age of 18, 12.80% from 18 to 24, 27.90% from 25 to 44, 21.20% from 45 to 64, and 13.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 101.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,966, and the median income for a family was $42,574. Males had a median income of $28,163 versus $21,412 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,423. About 9.90% of families and 13.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.50% of those under age 18 and 11.00% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics

Craven is a typical “Solid South” county in its presidential voting patterns. It was solidly Democratic until the 1960s: in five elections from 1932 to 1948 the Republican Party did not reach fifteen percent of the vote, and only in 1928 when a large anti-Catholic vote was cast against Al Smith did the GOP reach twenty percent between at least 1900 and 1948. The national Democratic party's support for the Civil Rights Movement caused its white electorate to defect to George Wallace’s American Independent campaign in 1968. Since that time, Craven has become a strongly Republican county. The last Democrat to carry Craven County was Jimmy Carter in 1976.

United States presidential election results for Craven County, North Carolina[22][23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 31,032 58.48% 21,148 39.85% 885 1.67%
2016 27,731 59.00% 17,630 37.51% 1,640 3.49%
2012 26,928 58.32% 18,763 40.64% 479 1.04%
2008 24,901 55.83% 19,352 43.39% 345 0.77%
2004 23,575 62.44% 14,019 37.13% 162 0.43%
2000 19,494 60.95% 12,213 38.18% 278 0.87%
1996 13,264 52.65% 10,317 40.96% 1,610 6.39%
1992 11,575 45.77% 9,998 39.54% 3,714 14.69%
1988 12,057 62.10% 7,313 37.66% 47 0.24%
1984 12,893 64.04% 7,186 35.69% 55 0.27%
1980 8,554 50.97% 7,781 46.36% 448 2.67%
1976 5,881 43.42% 7,553 55.77% 109 0.80%
1972 9,372 78.74% 2,384 20.03% 147 1.23%
1968 2,991 21.77% 4,240 30.86% 6,509 47.37%
1964 4,691 38.73% 7,422 61.27% 0 0.00%
1960 3,680 33.95% 7,158 66.05% 0 0.00%
1956 2,956 31.88% 6,317 68.12% 0 0.00%
1952 2,822 31.66% 6,092 68.34% 0 0.00%
1948 745 11.87% 5,039 80.26% 494 7.87%
1944 826 14.50% 4,872 85.50% 0 0.00%
1940 626 11.30% 4,916 88.70% 0 0.00%
1936 453 7.56% 5,543 92.44% 0 0.00%
1932 466 9.59% 4,375 90.02% 19 0.39%
1928 2,237 47.28% 2,494 52.72% 0 0.00%
1924 325 9.82% 2,942 88.86% 44 1.33%
1920 731 17.64% 3,413 82.36% 0 0.00%
1916 542 23.34% 1,780 76.66% 0 0.00%
1912 79 3.78% 1,819 87.12% 190 9.10%
1908 449 24.30% 1,399 75.70% 0 0.00%
1904 268 14.70% 1,555 85.30% 0 0.00%
1900 1,502 42.55% 2,028 57.45% 0 0.00%
1896 2,921 60.50% 1,810 37.49% 97 2.01%
1892 1,648 50.49% 1,305 39.98% 311 9.53%
1888 2,618 65.73% 1,359 34.12% 6 0.15%
1884 2,539 65.62% 1,330 34.38% 0 0.00%
1880 2,809 69.00% 1,180 28.99% 82 2.01%


Craven County is a member of the regional Eastern Carolina Council of Governments.

Communities

Map of Craven County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Craven County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

Sources

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Craven County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 19, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "North Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". North Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 22, 2015.
  4. ^ "Craven County". NCpedia. State Library of North Carolina. January 1, 2006. Retrieved January 22, 2015.
  5. ^ Connor, 1919, Vol. I, pp. 26-27
  6. ^ a b The historical records of North Carolina, Vol. I, p. 58
  7. ^ The historical records of North Carolina, Vol. II, p. 2
  8. ^ dill, 1946, p. 47
  9. ^ Wroth, 1938, p. 48
  10. ^ Thomas, 1874, Vol. I, p. 338; Vol. II, p. 166
  11. ^ Powell, 2000, pp. 34-35
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Craven County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  14. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  16. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  18. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 28, 2011. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  19. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Craven County, North Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 31, 2022.
  20. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  21. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 15, 2018.
  23. ^ "Our Campaigns - U.S. President". Retrieved January 22, 2021.

Further reading

Coordinates: 35°6′33″N 77°4′9″W / 35.10917°N 77.06917°W / 35.10917; -77.06917