Games of the VIII Olympiad
Host cityParis, France
Nations44
Athletes3,089 (2,954 men, 135 women)
Events126 in 17 sports (23 disciplines)
Opening5 July
Closing27 July
Opened by
StadiumStade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir
Summer
Antwerp 1920 Amsterdam 1928
Winter
Chamonix 1924 St Moritz 1928

The 1924 Summer Olympics (French: Les Jeux olympiques d'été de 1924), officially known as the Games of the VIII Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event which was celebrated in 1924 in Paris, France.

It was the second time Paris hosted the games (after 1900), becoming the first city to host the Olympics twice. The selection process for the 1924 Summer Olympics consisted of six bids, and Paris was selected ahead of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Los Angeles, Prague, and Rome. The selection was made at the 20th IOC Session in Lausanne in 1921.[2]

The cost of these Games was estimated to be 10,000,000F. With total receipts at 5,496,610F, the Olympics resulted in a hefty loss despite crowds that reached 60,000 people at a time.[3]

The opening ceremony was held on 5 July, but some competitions were already started from 4 May. The United States won the most gold and overall medals, having 229 athletes competing compared to the host's 401.

Highlights

Colombes Olympic Stadium
Colombes Olympic Stadium

Sports

Overall map of the Olympic venues
Overall map of the Olympic venues
The "Olympic Number" of Life, 10 Jul 1924.
The "Olympic Number" of Life, 10 Jul 1924.

126 events in 23 disciplines, comprising 17 sports, were part of the Olympic program in 1924. The number of events in each discipline is noted in parentheses.

Demonstration sports

Venues

Map of Olympic sites
Map of Olympic sites

Seventeen sports venues were used in the 1924 Summer Olympics. Stade de Colombes served as the final venue for the 1938 FIFA World Cup between Italy and Hungary.

Venue Sports Capacity Ref.
Bagatelle Polo 598 [7]
Bassin d'Argenteuil Rowing 2,216 [8]
Camp de Châlons Shooting (600 m free rifle individual and team) 395 [9]
Fontainebleau Modern pentathlon (riding) Not listed. [10]
Hippodrome d'Auteuil Equestrian 8,922 [11]
Issy-les-Moulineaux Shooting (trap shooting, including team event) 41 [12]
Le Havre Sailing 541 [13]
Le Stade Olympique de Reims Shooting (trap shooting, running target) 420 [14]
Le Stand de Tir de Versailles Modern pentathlon (shooting), Shooting (25 m rapid fire pistol, running deer) 82 [15]
Meulan-en-Yvelines Sailing 389 [16]
Piscine des Tourelles Diving, Modern pentathlon (swimming), Swimming, Water polo 8,023 [17]
Saint-Cloud Polo 7,836 [18]
Stade Bergeyre Football 10,455 [19]
Stade de Colombes Athletics, Cycling (road), Equestrian, Fencing, Football (final), Gymnastics, Modern pentathlon (fencing, running), Rugby union, Tennis 60,000 [20]
Stade de Paris Football 5,145 [21]
Stade Pershing Football 8,110 [22]
Vélodrome d'hiver Boxing, Fencing, Weightlifting, Wrestling 10,884 [23]
Vélodrome de Vincennes Cycling (track) 12,750 [24]

Participating nations

Participating Countries of the 1924 Olympiad
Participating Countries of the 1924 Olympiad
Number of athletes
Number of athletes

A total of 44 nations were represented at the 1924 Games. Germany was still absent, having not been invited by the Organizing Committee.[25] China (although did not compete), Ecuador, Haiti, Ireland, Lithuania, and Uruguay attended the Olympic Games for the first time while the Philippines competed for first time in an Olympic Games as a nation though it first participated in 1900 Summer Olympic Games also in this city. Latvia and Poland attended the Summer Olympic Games for the first time (having both appeared earlier at the 1924 Winter Olympics in Chamonix).

Participating National Olympic Committees

Number of athletes by National Olympic Committees

Medal count

Main article: 1924 Summer Olympics medal table

These are the top ten nations that won medals the 1924 Games.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 United States45272799
2 Finland14131037
3 France*13151038
4 Great Britain9131234
5 Italy83516
6 Switzerland781025
7 Norway52310
8 Sweden4131229
9 Netherlands41510
10 Belgium37313
Totals (10 nations)11210297311

Legacy

The 1924 Summer Olympics were the second edition of the Summer Olympics to be held in Paris. 100 years later, the city will host the 2024 Summer Olympics, marking the third time the city hosts the games. One venue from the 1924 Games is slated to be used in 2024. The extensively renovated and downsized main stadium, known since 1928 as Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir, will host field hockey.

Last surviving competitor

The last surviving competitor of the 1924 Summer Olympics was Croatian swimmer Ivo Pavelić, who died on 22 February 2011 at the age of 103.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Factsheet - Opening Ceremony of the Games f the Olympiad" (PDF) (Press release). International Olympic Committee. 13 September 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 August 2016. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  2. ^ "Past Olympic host city election results". GamesBids. Archived from the original on 24 January 2011. Retrieved 17 March 2011.
  3. ^ Zarnowski, C. Frank (Summer 1992). "A Look at Olympic Costs" (PDF). Citius, Altius, Fortius. 1 (1): 16–32. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 May 2017. Retrieved 10 August 2017.
  4. ^ The Official History of the Olympic Games and the IOC- Athens to Beijing, 1894–2008: David Miller (2008)
  5. ^ "Opening Ceremony" (PDF). International Olympics Committee. 2002. p. 3. Retrieved 23 August 2012.; "Sport athlétique", 14 mars 1891: "[...] dans une éloquente allocution il a souhaité que ce drapeau les conduise 'souvent à la victoire, à la lutte toujours'. Il a dit qu’il leur donnait pour devise ces trois mots qui sont le fondement et la raison d’être des sports athlétiques: citius, altius, fortius, 'plus vite, plus haut, plus fort'.", cited in Hoffmane, Simone La carrière du père Didon, Dominicain. 1840 - 1900, Doctoral thesis, Université de Paris IV - Sorbonne, 1985, p. 926; cf. Michaela Lochmann, Les fondements pédagogiques de la devise olympique „citius, altius, fortius"
  6. ^ M. Avé, Comité Olympique Français, pp. 601–612
  7. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 528-9. (in French)
  8. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 165-7. (in French)
  9. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 565-6. (in French)
  10. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 501-3. (in French)
  11. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 222-3. (in French)
  12. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 544-6, 549. (in French)
  13. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 584, 587. (in French)
  14. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 563-5, 568. (in French)
  15. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 489, 548-9.
  16. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 582-3, 587. (in French)
  17. ^ 1924 Olympic official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 438-40, 443-4, 499 (in French).
  18. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 528-9. (in French)
  19. ^ 1924 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 318, 320. (in French)
  20. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 50-5, 96-7, 121, 152, 216, 222, 238, 248, 265, 318, 339, 375, 499, 503, 536. (in French)
  21. ^ 1924 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 318, 321. (in French)
  22. ^ 1924 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 318, 322. (in French).
  23. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 182-3, 203-4, 255, 266, 400, 425, 507. (in French)
  24. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 5 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine pp. 200-217. (in French)
  25. ^ Guttmann, Allen (1992). The Olympics: A History of the Modern Games. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. p. 38. ISBN 0-252-01701-3.
  26. ^ M. Avé (ed.). Les Jeux de la VIIIe Olympiade Paris 1924 – Rapport Officiel (PDF) (in French). Paris: Librairie de France. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2011. Retrieved 16 October 2012. 39 seulement s’alignérent, ne représentant plus que 24 nations, la Chine, le Portugal et la Yougoslavie ayant déclaré forfait.
  27. ^ Georgiou, Mark (26 March 2012). "Everest Olympic medal pledge set to be honoured". BBC News. Retrieved 31 August 2012.
  28. ^ Douglas, Ed (19 May 2012). "My modest father never mentioned his Everest expedition Olympic gold". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 31 August 2012.
Preceded by
Antwerp
Summer Olympic Games
Paris

VIII Olympiad (1924)
Succeeded by
Amsterdam