Chanoclavine
Chanoclavine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
(2E)-2-Methyl-3-[(4R,5R)-4-(methylamino)-1,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[cd]indol-5-yl]prop-2-en-1-ol
Other names
chanoclavin-l
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C16H20N2O/c1-10(9-19)6-13-12-4-3-5-14-16(12)11(8-18-14)7-15(13)17-2/h3-6,8,13,15,17-19H,7,9H2,1-2H3/b10-6+/t13-,15-/m1/s1
    Key: SAHHMCVYMGARBT-HEESEWQSSA-N
  • InChI=1/C16H20N2O/c1-10(9-19)6-13-12-4-3-5-14-16(12)11(8-18-14)7-15(13)17-2/h3-6,8,13,15,17-19H,7,9H2,1-2H3/b10-6+/t13-,15-/m1/s1
    Key: SAHHMCVYMGARBT-HEESEWQSBR
  • C/C(=C\[C@H]1[C@@H](CC2=CNC3=CC=CC1=C23)NC)/CO
Properties
C16H20N2O
Molar mass 256.34 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Chanoclavine, also known as chanoclavin-l is a tri-cyclic ergot alkaloid (ergoline) isolate of certain fungi. It is mainly produced by members of the genus claviceps.[1] Long used in traditional Chinese medicine, it was found in 1987 mouse studies to stimulate dopamine D2 receptors in the brain.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Lorenz, N; Haarmann, T; Pazoutová, S; Jung, M; Tudzynski, P (2009). "The ergot alkaloid gene cluster: Functional analyses and evolutionary aspects". Phytochemistry. 70 (15–16): 1822–32. doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2009.05.023. PMID 19695648.
  2. ^ Watanabe, H; Somei, M; Sekihara, S; Nakagawa, K; Yamada, F (1987). "Dopamine receptor stimulating effects of chanoclavine analogues, tricyclic ergot alkaloids, in the brain". Japanese Journal of Pharmacology. 45 (4): 501–6. doi:10.1254/jjp.45.501. PMID 3127619.