Cessna 404 Titan
Cessna 404 G-EXEX IMG 7659 (9502692081).jpg
Role Light passenger/cargo aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Cessna
First flight February 26, 1975
Introduction 1976
Produced 1976–1982
Number built 396
Developed from Cessna 402
Developed into Reims-Cessna F406 Caravan II
Cessna 441 Conquest II

The Cessna Model 404 Titan is an American twin-engined, light aircraft built by Cessna Aircraft. It was that company's largest twin piston-engined aircraft at the time of its development in the 1970s. Its US military designation is C-28, and Swedish Air Force designation Tp 87.[1]

Design and development

The aft doors on the left side
The aft doors on the left side

The Cessna 404 was a development of the Cessna 402 with an enlarged vertical tail and other changes. The prototype first flew on February 26, 1975. It is powered by two 375 hp/280 kW turbocharged Continental Motors GTSIO-520 piston engines. Two versions were offered originally; the Titan Ambassador passenger aircraft for ten passengers, and the Titan Courier utility aircraft for passengers or cargo. By early 1982 seven different variants were available, including a pure cargo version, the Titan Freighter. The Freighter was fitted with a strengthened floor, cargo doors, and its interior walls and ceiling were made from impact-resistant polycarbonate materials to minimize damage in the event of cargo breaking free in-flight.

Variants

Operators

Military operators

 Bahamas
 Bolivia
 Colombia
 Dominican Republic
 Hong Kong
 Jamaica
 Mexico
 Nicaragua
 Sweden
 Tanzania
 United States
 Puerto Rico

Specifications (Ambassador I)

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1980–81[11]

General characteristics

Performance

See also

A Cessna 404 Titan (left) with square windows besides a pressurized Cessna 421 (right) with round windows
A Cessna 404 Titan (left) with square windows besides a pressurized Cessna 421 (right) with round windows

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

References

  1. ^ Urban Fredriksson (October 4, 2006). "Swedish Military Aircraft Designations". Retrieved September 26, 2012.
  2. ^ Johnson 2013, p. 375
  3. ^ Hagedorn 1993, p. 140
  4. ^ Gaines Flight International 6 November 1982, p. 1386
  5. ^ Hagedorn 1993, p. 111
  6. ^ Air International April 1986, p. 170
  7. ^ Hagedorn 1993, p. 138
  8. ^ ANUARIO LATINOAMERICANO DE DEFENSA 2020. Grupo Edefa. 2020. p. 176.
  9. ^ "FDRA - Fuerza Aérea: Fuerzas Aéreas: Fuerza Aérea - Ejército de Nicaragua". December 2015.
  10. ^ Gaines Flight International 6 November 1982, p. 1374
  11. ^ Taylor 1980, pp. 326–327