This is a list of military conflicts in which Hungarian armed forces participated in or took place on the historical territory of Hungary.

The list gives the name, the date, the Hungarian allies and enemies, and the result of these conflicts following this legend:

  Victory
  Defeat
  Result of civil or internal conflict
  A treaty or peace without a clear result, status quo ante bellum, an unknown or indecisive result
  Ongoing conflict

Middle Ages

Wars under the Árpád dynasty's rule

Date Conflict Allies Enemies Result
~800–970 Hungarian invasions of Europe
Hungarian invasions of Europe in the 9–10th century
Hungarian Tribes Kingdom of Italy
East Francia
West Francia
Middle Francia
Great Moravia
Byzantine Empire
Al-Andalus
First Bulgarian Empire
Principality of Serbia
More than a century of raids and decisive wars
  • Between 899 and 970, according to contemporary sources, the researchers count 47 (38 to West and 9 to East)[1] raids in different parts of Europe. From these campaigns only 8 were unsuccessful and the others ended with success.[2]
  • Many tributes were paid to the Hungarians.
  • Many times the rulers of Europe hired the Hungarian warriors against each other.
  • The most significant result of the Battle of Pressburg is that the Hungarians secured their lands in 907, prevented a future German invasion, the Germans did not attack Hungarian land until 1030.
  • The Hungarians also used a preemptive war against the Germans and the German unification.
  • A Hungarian army was defeated in German land at the Battle of Lechfeld in 955. Seven years later Otto I was rewarded for stopping the Hungarians and he was crowned Emperor by Pope John XII in 962 and the Holy Roman Empire (962–1806) was established.[1]
  • The Hungarian military presence stabilized the Hungarian state in the Carpathian Basin.
811 Battle of Pliska
The Battle of Pliska (Manasses Chronicle, 12th century)
First Bulgarian Empire
Hungarian Tribes
Avar mercenaries
Byzantine Empire Decisive Bulgarian victory
~830 Hungarian – Khazar War Hungarian Tribes Khazars Hungarian victory
894 Byzantine – Bulgarian War Hungarian Tribes
Byzantine Empire
First Bulgarian Empire
895 Campaign of Kiev
The Hungarians at Kiev (painting by Pál Vágó, 1885)
Hungarian Tribes Kievan Rus' Hungarian victory
~895–902 Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin
Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin (painting by Mihály Munkácsy, 1893)
Hungarian Tribes East Francia
Great Moravia
First Bulgarian Empire
Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin
899 Battle of Brenta
Hungarian mounted archer shooting a knight who chases him (fresco in Basilica of Aquileia, 12th century)
Principality of Hungary Kingdom of Italy Hungarian victory
901 Carinthian campaign Principality of Hungary East Francia
Duchy of Carinthia
Hungarian victory
  • Both sides suffered a heavy casualties at the Battle of Laibach, Duke Eberhard and Duke Gottfried died.
  • After the battle, Hungarian raid to Carinthia, Carniola, Styria.
907 Battle of Pressburg / Pozsony
Battle of Pressburg (painting by Peter Johann Nepomuk Geiger, 1850)
Principality of Hungary East Francia
Duchy of Bavaria
Decisive Hungarian victory
908 Battle of Eisenach
Hungarian horse archers, a detail of the Arrival of the Hungarians (Feszty Panorama) (painting by Árpád Feszty, 1894)
Principality of Hungary East Francia Hungarian victory
910 Battle of Lechfeld / Augsburg Principality of Hungary East Francia
Swabia
Hungarian victory
910 Battle of Rednitz Principality of Hungary East Francia
Duchy of Franconia
Duchy of Lotharingia
Duchy of Bavaria
Hungarian victory
917 Battle of Achelous
The Bulgarian victory at Anchelous (13th century)
First Bulgarian Empire
Principality of Hungary
Pechenegs
Byzantine Empire Bulgarian victory
919 Battle of Püchen Principality of Hungary East Francia Hungarian victory
933 Battle of Merseburg / Riade
Henry the Fowler fights against the Hungarians, (Sächsische Weltchronik, 1270)
Principality of Hungary East Francia German victory
934 Battle of W.l.n.d.r
Chronicon Pictum, Hungary, horse, Hungarian warriors, Bulgaria, castle, mountain, medieval, chronicle, book, illumination, illustration, history
Hungarian warriors in Bulgaria (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Principality of Hungary
Pechenegs
Muslim auxiliary troops
Byzantine Empire
First Bulgarian Empire
Muslims converted to Christianity
Decisive Hungarian – Pecheneg victory
942 Battle of Fraxinet Principality of Hungary Muslims Hungarian victory
942 Hungarian raid in Spain (942) Principality of Hungary Caliphate of Córdoba

Catalan Counties

Hungarian victory
955 Battle of Lechfeld / Augsburg
Miniature of the story of Lehel's Horn (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Principality of Hungary Kingdom of Germany
Duchy of Saxony
Duchy of Thuringia
Duchy of Bavaria
Duchy of Swabia
Duchy of Bohemia
Hungarian defeat
960 Battle of Drina (Its existence is questionable) Principality of Hungary Principality of Serbia Serbian victory
  • Hungarian leader named Kisa was defeated by Časlav, the Prince of Serbia.
960 Battle of Syrmia
Illustration of Časlav being thrown into the Sava by the Hungarians (19th century)
Principality of Hungary Principality of Serbia Hungarian victory
  • A Hungarian army defeated Časlav, the Prince of Serbia by avenge of the widow of Kisa.
970 Battle of Arcadiopolis Principality of Hungary
Kievan Rus'
First Bulgarian Empire
Pechenegs
Byzantine Empire Byzantine victory
  • End of the Hungarian invasions of Europe.
984 Hungarian – German border conflict at Melk
Leopold the Illustrious fighting the Hungarians and defending Melk (Babenberger Stammbaum, 1489–1492)
Principality of Hungary Margraviate of Austria Hungarian defeat
997 Koppány's revolt
The execution of Koppány (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Principality of Hungary
Holy Roman Empire
Koppány's Army Koppány's defeat
1002 King Stephen I's military campaign against Gyula of Transylvania
King Saint Stephen of Hungary captures his uncle Gyula, the ruler of Transylvania (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Hungarian Royal Army Gyula III of Transylvania Successful campaign of King Saint Stephen of Hungary
1008 (?),

1029 (?)

King Stephen I's military campaign against Ajtony, a tribal leader in the Banat Kingdom of Hungary Ajtony's Army Successful campaign, Ajtony's defeat
1017–1018 Hungarian – Polish war Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Poland Stalemate
~1018 Pecheneg attack against Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Pecheneg tribes Hungarian victory
1018 Hungarian – Bulgarian War
King Saint Stephen of Hungary defeats Kean "Duke of the Bulgarians and Slavs" (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary
Byzantine Empire
First Bulgarian Empire Hungarian – Byzantine victory
1018 The intervention of Boleslaw the Brave, Duke of Poland in the Kievan succession crisis Duchy of Poland
Kingdom of Hungary
Holy Roman Empire
Pechenegs
Kievan Rus' Temporary victory for Sviatopolk and Bolesław, Polish sack of Kiev
1030–1031 Emperor Conrad II's military campaign against Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1041 Uprising against King Peter Orseolo
King Peter Orseolo (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Hungarian Army Hungarian nobles Suppression of King Peter
1042–1043 German – Hungarian wars Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian defeat
1044 Henry III's military campaign against Hungary
Battle of Ménfő, on the right side of the picture Emperor Henry III gives thanks for victory, on the left a soldier executes King Samuel Aba (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
The army of King Samuel Aba Holy Roman Empire
Peter Orseolo and his allies
Defeat of Samuel Aba, restoration of Peter
1046 War between King Peter and Prince Andrew
The blinding of King Peter, Prince Andrew takes the Hungarian crown (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
King Peter's army
Holy Roman Empire
Prince Andrew's army
Kievan Rus'
Hungarian victory
1046 Vata pagan uprising
Pagans slaughtering priests and the martyrdom of Bishop Gerard of Csanád (Anjou Legendarium, 1330)
King Peter, later King Andrew I Paganic rebels Prince Andrew's victory
  • During this rebellion, Vata gained power over a group of rebels who wished to abolish Christian rule and revert to paganism.
  • Bishop Gerard of Csanád invited Vazul's exiled sons to the country.
  • Prince Andrew and Levente returned to Hungary from their exile and quickly gained popular support for the throne, especially among the pagan populace, despite the fact that Andrew was Christian (Levente had remained pagan). On their return, a rebellion began, which Andrew and Levente initially supported. The princes accepted the claims of the rebellers in exchange for fighting against King Peter.
  • King Peter decided to flee from Hungary and take refuge in Austria. Andrew's envoys tricked the king before he reached the frontier. King Peter fled to a fortified manor at Zámoly, but his opponents captured him. King Peter was blinded, which caused his death.
  • The pagans slaughtered priests and Bishop Gerard of Csanád.
  • Prince Andrew pronounced himself king.
  • King Andrew soon broke with his pagan supporters, restored Christianity and declared pagan rites illegal.
1051–1052
  • 1051
Emperor Henry III's military campaigns against Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Bohemia
Hungarian victory
1052 Emperor Henry III's fifth military campaign against Hungary
The destruction of Emperor Henry III ships at the Castle of Pozsony (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1056–1058 German – Hungarian border war Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Stalemate, treaty of Marchfeld
1060 Civil war between King Andrew I and his brother, Prince Béla
  • Battle of Moson
King Andrew I's army
Holy Roman Empire
Prince Béla's army
Kingdom of Poland
Prince Béla's victory
1061 Second paganic uprising Hungarian army Paganic rebels Uprising suppressed
1063 German invasion of Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian defeat
1067 Croatian campaign Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Carinthia Hungarian victory
1068 Hungarian – Bohemian war Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Bohemia
King Solomon of Hungary occupies Bohemia[12][13]
1068 Pecheneg attack against Hungary
Saint Ladislaus is fighting a duel with a Cuman warrior who kidnapped a girl (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Pechenegs
Ouzes
Hungarian victory
1071–1072 Hungarian – Byzantine war
King Solomon and Prince Géza receive gifts from the locals at Niš (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Byzantine Empire
Pechenegs
Hungarian victory
  • Pecheneg troops pillaged Syrmia in 1071. The king and the duke suspected that the soldiers of the Byzantine garrison at Belgrade incited the marauders against Hungary, they decided to attack the fortress.
  • The Hungarian army crossed the river Sava, although the Byzantines used Greek fire against their boats. The Hungarians defeated the Pechenegs who helped the Byzantines to relief the siege. Finally the Hungarians took Belgrade after a siege of three months.
  • King Solomon and Prince Géza marched along the valley of the river Great Morava as far as Niš. The Hungarians seized the Byzantine city without any resistance.[14]
1074 Civil war between King Solomon and his cousins Géza and Ladislaus
Battle of Mogyoród (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
King Solomon's army
Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Bohemia
Prince Géza's army
Prince Ladislaus's army
Prince Otto's army
Prince Géza and Ladislaus defeat the armies of King Solomon and Emperor Henry IV. King Solomon was dethroned.
1075 Henry IV's military campaign against Hungary
The Escape of King Solomon (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire
Solomon's army
Hungarian victory
The Campaigns of King Ladislaus I (1079–1095)
1079 Henry IV's military campaign against King Saint Ladislaus Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory[15]
1085 Cuman attack against Hungary
King Saint Ladislaus, the knight-king (fresco in the church of Székelyderzs, 1419)
Kingdom of Hungary Cuman tribes
Solomon's army
Hungarian victory
  • King Saint Ladislaus planned to make peace and an agreement with Solomon, the former king of Hungary, but Solomon soon began conspiring against Ladislaus, and Ladislaus imprisoned him.
  • The first five Hungarian saints, including the first king of Hungary, Stephen I, and Stephen's son, Emeric, were canonized during Ladislaus's reign. Ladislaus released Solomon at the time of the ceremony. After his release, Solomon made a final effort to regain his crown. He persuaded a Cuman chieftain, Kutesk, to invade Hungary. Solomon promised Kutesk, that he would give him the right of possession over the province of Transylvania and would take his daughter as wife. King Ladislaus defeated the invaders.
  • At the head of a large contingent Solomon joined a huge army of Cumans and Pechenegs who invaded the Byzantine Empire in 1087. The Byzantines routed the invaders, Solomon seems to have died fighting in the battlefield.
1091 Hungarian occupation of Croatia
King Saint Ladislaus of Hungary crosses the river Drava to conquer Croatia (painting by Bertalan Székely, 19th century)
Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Croatia Hungarian victory
1091 Cuman attack against Hungary
Saint Ladislaus is chasing and fighting a duel with a Cuman warrior (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Cuman tribes Hungarian victory
1091 Battle near Severin / Szörényvár against the Cumans Kingdom of Hungary Cuman tribes Hungarian victory
  • The rumor of the losing battle reached the Cuman camp, the Cumans threatened King Ladislaus I with revenge and demanded to free the Cuman prisoners.[16]
  • King Ladislaus I marched to the Hungarian border to prevent the next invasion. The two army clashed near Severin / Szörényvár, the Hungarian army was victorious, King Ladislaus killed Ákos, the Cuman chieftain.[16]
1092 Ruthenian campaign by King Saint Ladislaus
The Ruthenians pledge allegiance to King Saint Ladislaus (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Kievan Rus' Hungarian victory
1094 King Ladislaus I's intervention in a Polish conflict
Siege of Kraków (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Poland Hungarian victory
  • Władysław I Herman, Duke of Poland was a cousin of King Ladislaus I of Hungary.[18] King Ladislaus I's intervented in a conflict between Władysław I Herman, Duke of Poland, and the duke's illegitimate son, Zbigniew.
  • King Ladislaus I marched to Poland and captured Herman's younger son, Boleslaus.
  • The Hungarian troops captured Kraków during Ladislaus' campaign.[18]
  • At Ladislaus' demand, Władysław I Herman declared Zbigniew his legitimate son.
The Campaigns of King Coloman (1095–1116)
1095 Campaign in Apulia Kingdom of Hungary
Republic of Venice
Principality of Taranto Hungarian victory
1096 King Coloman's defensive operations against the different armies of the crusaders
King Coloman's meeting with Godfrey of Bouillon (13th century)
Kingdom of Hungary French and German crusaders Hungarian victories
  • The first group of crusaders was led by Walter Sans Avoir with 150,000 troops. King Coloman received them in a friendly way and allowed them into the kingdom. They proceeded through Hungary without any major conflicts, the only incident occurred near the Hungarian–Byzantine border at Zimony.[20]
  • The next group was headed by Peter the Hermit with 40,000 troops. King Coloman permitted them to enter Hungary only after Peter pledged that he would prevent them from pillaging the countryside, but Peter could not keep his promise, the crusaders plundered and raped locals. They reached Zimony, where they learned of the story of the previous conflict. The crusaders besieged and took the town, where they massacred many thousand Hungarians. They only withdrew when Coloman's troops approached them.[20]
  • The third band of crusaders was led by Folkmar with 12,000 men reached Nyitra and when they saw the richness of the countryside they began plundering the region. These were soon routed by the local Hungarians.[20]
  • A fourth army that came to Moson was led by Gottschalk with 15,000 men. They camped near Pannonhalma, to seize food and wine, the crusaders made frequent pillaging raids against the nearby settlements. King Coloman attacked and massacred the majority of them. The crusader mob of Gottschalk fled with 3,000 men from Hungary.[20]
  • Following these incidents, King Coloman forbade the crusaders who arrived under the leadership of Count Emicho with 200,000 men to enter Hungary. The crusaders besieged Moson, their catapults destroyed the walls in two places, enabling them to storm into the fortress. King Coloman defended the fortress. After six weeks the morale of the crusader mob began to fail, which inspired the Hungarians, a panic broke out among the attackers that enabled the garrison to carry out a sortie and rout them, and most of the mob was slaughtered or drowned in the river.[20]
  • The first crusader army organized by the Holy See was led by Godfrey of Bouillon with 80,000 troops. King Coloman agreed to meet with Godfrey in Sopron. The king allowed the crusaders to march through his kingdom but stipulated that Godfrey's younger brother Baldwin and his family should stay with him as hostages. The crusaders passed through Hungary peacefully along the right bank of the Danube, King Coloman and his army followed them on the left bank. He only released his hostages after all the crusaders had crossed the river Sava. The uneventful march of the main crusader army across Hungary established Coloman's good reputation throughout Europe.[20]
1096 Occupation of Biograd na Moru / Tengerfehérvár Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Croatia Hungarian occupation of Biograd na Moru
1097 Battle of Gvozd Mountain
Death of the Last Croatian King (painting by Oton Iveković, 1894)
Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Croatia Decisive Hungarian victory
1099 King Coloman's war against the Kievan Rus' Kingdom of Hungary David Igorevich's army
Cuman tribes
Hungarian defeat
1105 Siege of Zara and occupation of Dalmatia Kingdom of Hungary Dalmatian cities
Republic of Venice
Hungarian victory
1107 Campaign in Apulia Kingdom of Hungary
Byzantine Empire
Republic of Venice
Principality of Taranto Hungarian victory
1108 Hungarian war with the Holy Roman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Bohemia
Hungarian victory
1115–1119 Hungarian – Venetian wars Kingdom of Hungary Republic of Venice Hungarian defeat
1123 Stephen II's intervention in the Kievan Rus' internal conflict Kingdom of Hungary

Iaroslav from Vladimir

Kievan Rus' Hungarian retreat
1124–1125 Hungarian – Venetian war Kingdom of Hungary Republic of Venice Hungarian defeat
1127–1129 Byzantine-Hungarian War (1127–29) Kingdom of Hungary
Grand Principality of Serbia
Byzantine Empire Stalemate, peace agreement
1132 Hungarian – Polish war[24] Kingdom of Hungary
Duchy of Austria
Kingdom of Poland Hungarian victory
1136–1137 Béla II's balcanic campaigns (against Venice and the Byzantine Empire) Kingdom of Hungary Byzantine Empire
Republic of Venice
Hungarian victory
1146 Battle of the Fischa
The Battle of the Fischa (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Bavaria
Duchy of Austria
Hungarian victory
1149–1152 Géza II's intervention in the conflict between the Principality of Halych and Kievan Rus' Kingdom of Hungary
Kievan Rus'
Principality of Halych Peace agreement
1148–1155 Hungarian – Byzantine wars Kingdom of Hungary
Grand Principality of Serbia
Byzantine Empire Ceasefire
1154 Siege of Braničevo Kingdom of Hungary
Cumans
Byzantine Empire Abandoned siege, Hungarian retreat
1162–1165 Hungarian civil war between Stephen III and his uncles Ladislaus and Stephen Kingdom of Hungary
Holy Roman Empire
Ladislaus and Stephen's army

Byzantine Empire

Stephen III's victory
1167 Battle of Sirmium Kingdom of Hungary
Banate of Bosnia
Byzantine Empire
Serbian Grand Principality
Decisive Byzantine victory, Hungary lost Dalmatia
1168 Hungarian – Bohemian war Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Bohemia
Hungarian victory
1176 Battle of Myriokephalon Byzantine Empire
Kingdom of Hungary
Principality of Antioch
Grand Principality of Serbia
Sultanate of Rum Seljuk victory
1180–1185 Hungarian – Byzantine war Kingdom of Hungary Byzantine Empire Hungarian victory, Hungary occupies Dalmatia
1188–1189 King Béla III's military campaign against Halych Kingdom of Hungary Principality of Halych Hungarian victory, occupation of Halych
1190 Battle of Iconium Holy Roman Empire
Kingdom of Hungary
Sultanate of Rum Crusader victory
1197–1199, 1203 Civil war between King Emeric and his brother Andrew
Emeric captures his rebellious younger brother Andrew (painting by Mór Than, 1857)
Emeric's army Andrew's army Emeric's victory
1201–1205 Emeric's balcanic wars Kingdom of Hungary Second Bulgarian Empire
Grand Principality of Serbia

Bosnia

Hungarian victories
1202 Siege of Zara
The crusaders conquering the City of Zara in 1202 (painting by Andrea Vicentino, 16th century)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Soldiers of the Fourth Crusade
Republic of Venice
Hungarian defeat
  • Venetians and Crusaders sacked the city
1213–1214, 1219,

1233–1234

King Andrew II's military campaigns against Halych Kingdom of Hungary Principality of Halych Hungarian defeat
1217–1218 King Andrew II's participation in the Fifth crusade
  • Battle of Bethsaida
King Andrew II at the head of his crusader army (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary
Duchy of Austria
Latin Empire of Constantinople
Ayyubids Hungarian victories on the battlefields. Muslim forces retreated to their fortresses and towns.
1225 King Andrew II expels the Teutonic Knights from Transylvania, the order had to move to Poland Kingdom of Hungary
Teutonic Knights Hungarian victory
1237–1241 Bosnian Crusade The Hungarian successes were followed by quick Hungarian retreat because of the Mongol invasion of Hungary Coloman of Galicia-Lodomeria "Heretics" within the Banate of Bosnia Stalemate after the quick Hungarian retreat due to the Mongol attacks
1241 Battle of Mohi Kingdom of Hungary Mongols Hungarian defeat
1241–1242 First Mongol invasion of Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Mongols Mongol victory at the Battle of Mohi. Mongols retreated within a year from Hungary due to the local Hungarian withstand. Both sides suffered a heavy casualties.[25]
1242 Battle of Grobnik Field Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Mongols Hungarian – Croatian victory[25]
1242 King Béla IV's punishing campaign against Frederick II, Duke of Austria Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Austria Hungarian victory[26]
1243 Siege of Zara Kingdom of Hungary Republic of Venice Hungarian defeat
1246 Battle of the Leitha River Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Austria Hungarian defeat
1250–1278 Hungarian – Bohemian wars Kingdom of Hungary
Holy Roman Empire
Kingdom of Bohemia
Duchy of Austria
Bohemian defeat
1259 Battle of Pelagonia Empire of Nicaea
Cuman cavalry
Hungarian mounted archers
Turkish cavalry
Serbian horsemen
German knights
Despotate of Epirus
Principality of Achaea
Duchy of Athens
Duchy of the Archipelago
Triarchy of Negroponte
Kingdom of Sicily
Decisive Nicaean victory
1260 Battle of Kressenbrunn
The Battle of Kressenbrunn (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Kingdom of Poland
Principality of Halych
Kingdom of Bohemia

Margraviate of Moravia
Duchy of Austria
Duchy of Styria
Duchy of Silesia
Duchy of Carinthia
Bohemian victory
1261–1262 Occupation of Konstantin Tih's Bulgarian Empire by King Béla IV. Kingdom of Hungary Second Bulgarian Empire Hungarian victory[27][28]
1264–1265 Internal conflict between King Béla IV and his son, Stephen King Béla IV's army Duke Stephen's army Stephen's victory, he got eastern Hungary as a duchy
1268 Mačva War Béla IV 's army captures Stefan Uroš I. Their conflict was solved with dynastic marriage. Béla IV of Hungary  Kingdom of Serbia (medieval), Stefan Uroš I Hungarian victory
1272–1279 Feudal anarchy King Ladislaus IV
Csák noble family
Kőszegi noble family
Gutkeled noble family
Royal victory
1277 Stefan Dragutin – Stefan Uroš I conflict Stefan Dragutin
Kingdom of Hungary
 Kingdom of Serbia (medieval) Stefan Uroš I Hungarian victory
1277 Hungary's war with Litovoi in Cumania Kingdom of Hungary Litovoi's army Hungarian victory
1278 Battle on the Marchfeld, at Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen
Battle on the Marchfeld (painting by Anton Petter, 1858)
Kingdom of Hungary
Duchy of Austria
Kingdom of Germany
Burgraviate of Nuremberg
Czech lands
Duchy of Głogów
Duchy of Lower Bavaria
Duchy of Silesia
Decisive Hungarian – German victory
1282 Cumanic uprising
The arrival of different clans to Hungary (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Cumanic tribes Hungarian victory
1285–1286 Second Mongol invasion of Hungary
Mongols in Hungary in 1285 (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Golden Horde Decisive Hungarian victory
1287–1288 Third Mongol invasion of Poland Kingdom of Poland
Kingdom of Hungary
Golden Horde
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Polish – Hungarian victory
1291 German – Hungarian war Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1290–1301 Croato–Hungarian war of succession after the death of king Ladislaus IV of Hungary and Croatia Árpád dynasty
Šubić family
House of Anjou
Kőszegi family
Indecisive
  • Árpáds were winning militarily, but Andrew III's death in 1301 extinguished the Árpád dynasty and triggered the Árpád war of succession in Hungary (1301–1308)
  • Paul I Šubić of Bribir became de facto independent ruler of Croatia
1298 Battle of Göllheim Duchy of Austria
Kingdom of Bohemia
Kingdom of Hungary
County of Nassau
Electoral Palatinate
Habsburg victory

Wars between 1301 and 1526

Date Conflict Allies Enemies Result
1301–1308 Árpád war of succession, after the extinction of the Árpád dynasty Charles Robert of Anjou
Duchy of Austria
Matthew III Csák's army
László Kán's army
Kingdom of Bohemia
Duchy of Bavaria
Kőszegi Hungarian noble family
Angevin victory
  • Charles Robert of Anjou became Hungarian king
1310–1321 King Charles I's wars for the centralized power against the Hungarian aristocracy Kingdom of Hungary
Order of Saint John
Zipser Saxons
Matthew III Csák
Aba dynasty
Borsa family
Apor family
Kőszegi family
Royal victory
  • Centralization of the Hungarian Kingdom
1312 Battle of Rozgony
Battle of Rozgony (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary
Order of Saint John
Zipser Saxons
Aba dynasty
Matthew III Csák
Decisive victory for King Charles I, weakening of the magnates
1319 Belgrade and Banate of Mačva Charles I of Hungary  Kingdom of Serbia (medieval), Stefan Milutin Victory for Charles I
1322–1337 Hungarian – Austrian War, restoration of the western borders, defeat of Austria, Kőszegi and Babonić families Kingdom of Hungary Duchy of Austria
Holy Roman Empire
Kőszegi family
Babonić Croatian noble family
Hungarian victory
1321–1324 Hungarian–Serbian War Kingdom of Hungary
Bosnia
Stephen Vladislav II of Syrmia
 Kingdom of Serbia (medieval) Hungarian defeat
1330 Battle of Posada
Battle of Posada (Chronicon Pictum, 1358)
Kingdom of Hungary Wallachia Hungarian defeat
  • The Wallachian army led by Basarab, formed of cavalry, peasants and foot archers, ambushed and defeated the 30,000-strong Hungarian army, in a mountainous region
1344 King Louis the Great's invasion and occupation of Wallachia and Moldavia[29] Kingdom of Hungary Wallachia
Moldavia
Hungarian victory, Wallachia and Moldavia became vassal states of King Louis the Great[30]
1345–1358 Hungarian – Venetian War, Venice had to pay annual tribute to Louis. Venetians also had to raise the Angevin flag on Piazza San Marco. Kingdom of Hungary Republic of Venice Decisive Hungarian victory Treaty of Zadar
1345 The campaign of King Louis I against the rebellious Croatian nobles
The campaign of King Louis I against the rebellious Croatian nobles (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Croatian nobles Hungarian victory
1345 Hungary's war with the Golden Horde Kingdom of Hungary Golden Horde Hungarian victory
  • The Golden Horde was pushed back behind the Dniester River, the Golden Horde's control of the lands between the Eastern Carpathians and the Black Sea weakened
  • The establishment of Moldavia in 1346 as a Hungarian vassal state.
1347–1349, 1350–1352 Hungarian-Naples Wars
The battle of Voivode Stephen Lackfi against Louis of Taranto around Naples (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Naples First campaign: temporary Hungarian victory
Second campaign: status quo ante bellum
1348 Battle of Capua Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Naples Hungarian victory, occupation of the kingdom
1360–1369 Louis I's balcanic wars (against Serbia, Bulgaria, Wallachia and Bosnia) Kingdom of Hungary  Serbian Empire
Second Bulgarian Empire
Bosnia
Wallachia Wallachia
Temporary Hungarian victories
1366–1367 Hungarian – Ottoman War Kingdom of Hungary
 Duchy of Savoya
 Padova
Republic of Venice
Kingdom of France
Byzantine Empire
Ottoman Empire
Second Bulgarian Empire
Christian victory
1369 Wallachian campaign Kingdom of Hungary Wallachia Hungarian victory
1372–1381 War of Chioggia, Hungary defeated the Venetians in several times, and finally expelled Venetians from Dalmatia, however Genoa, Padoa and Austria lost the War. The war resulted in the Treaty of Turin (1381) Kingdom of Hungary

 Padua
Republic of Genoa
Duchy of Austria

Republic of Venice
Milan
 Ottoman Empire
 Kingdom of Cyprus
Hungarian victory, Venice had to pay annual tribute to King of Hungary
1375–1377 Hungarian–Ottoman War
Victory of Louis the Great of Hungary against the Ottomans in Bulgaria (St. Lambert's Abbey, 1420)
Kingdom of Hungary

Kingdom of Poland

Ottoman Empire
Second Bulgarian Empire
Hungarian victory
1377 Hungarian – Lithuanian war Kingdom of Hungary Grand Duchy of Lithuania Hungarian victory, Louis I enters Vilnius[31]
1384–1394 Civil war between a part of the Hungarian nobility and Mary, Queen of Hungary and Sigismund king Kingdom of Hungary Horváti family
Kingdom of Naples
Sigismund's victory
1394–1395 Wallachian campaign Kingdom of Hungary Wallachia Wallachia became a Hungarian vassal, Mircea I the Great accepted the lordship of King Sigismund without any fight.
1394–1395 Moldavian campaign Kingdom of Hungary Moldavia Hungarian victory
1396 Battle of Nicopolis
Battle of Nicopolis (painting by Sébastien Mamerot, 1472–1475)
Kingdom of Hungary
Holy Roman Empire
Kingdom of France
Knights Hospitaller
Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Savoy
Wallachia
Lands of the Bohemian Crown
Kingdom of Poland
Kingdom of Croatia
Swiss Confederacy
Kingdom of England
Republic of Venice
Republic of Genoa
Crown of Castile
Crown of Aragon
Kingdom of Navarre
Second Bulgarian Empire
Teutonic Order
Byzantine Empire
Ottoman Empire
Moravian Serbia
Crusader defeat
  • King Sigismund of Hungary had experience fighting with the Ottomans, but the French knights refused his battle plan. The French knights rushed to the Ottoman lines, while the other allies stayed with the Hungarian forces under King Sigismund, this caused confusion and divided the strength of the Crusader army.
  • Ottomans defeat Crusades and no new Anti-Ottoman alliance is formed till the 1440s.
  • Ottomans maintain pressure on Constantinople, tightened control over the Balkans, and became a greater threat to central Europe.
  • Collapse of Second Bulgarian Empire.
1407–1408 Bosnian campaign
  • Battle of Dobor
Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Bosnia Hungarian victory
1411–1433 Hungarian – Venetian War Kingdom of Hungary
Milan
Republic of Venice Dalmatia became part of Venice
1415–1419 Hungarian – Ottoman War Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Stalemate
1419–1434 Hussite Wars
Battle of King Sigismund and the Hussites (miniature by Eberhard Windeck, 1440–50)
Holy Roman Empire
Kingdom of Hungary
Hussites Eventual defeat for Radical Hussites, victory for Moderate Hussites
1420–1432 War of the South Danube Kingdom of Hungary
Wallachia
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Ottoman Empire Armistice
1437 Transylvanian peasant revolt of Budai Nagy Antal Kingdom of Hungary Transilvanian peasants Defeat of the rebels
1437–1442 Hungarian–Ottoman War Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1440 Siege of Belgrade Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1440–1442 Civil war between Wladyslaw I and Ladislaus Kingdom of Hungary
Hungarian nobles
Cillei family and other Hungarian nobles Peace agreement, Wladyslaw is accepted as Hungarian king
1442 Battle of Hermannstadt / Szeben
John Hunyadi is fighting with the Turks (lithography by József Marastoni, 19th century)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
  • John Hunyadi marked his third victory over the Ottomans after the relief of Smederevo (1437) and the defeat of Ishak Beg midway between Semendria and Belgrade (1441).[32]
  • When John Hunyadi defeated Mezid Bey and the raiding Ottoman army in the south part of the Kingdom of Hungary in Transylvania, Hunyadi chased the Ottomans beyond the Hungarian borders and the Hungarian army penetrated Wallachia at the Red Tower Pass, Hunyadi forced Voivode Vlad II Dracul to became again a Hungarian vassal. Later continuing his campaign, Hunyadi also forced the Moldavian voivodes Ilie and Stephen II, who until that time had recognized the authority of the Polish king, to renew their loyalty to the Hungarian king.[32]
1442 Battle near the Iron Gate / Vaskapu
The battle of John Hunyad at the Iron Gate (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
  • According to contemporary sources, Ottoman army had 80,000 people, Hungarian army had 15,000 men.[33] John Hunyadi defeated a large Ottoman army of Beylerbey Şehabeddin, the Provincial Governor of Rumelia.[34]
  • This was the first time that a European army defeated such a large Ottoman force, composed not only of raiders, but of the provincial cavalry led by their own sanjak beys (governors) and accompanied by the formidable janissaries.[34]
  • Hunyadi gained a huge booty. He put lots of treasures and weapons on a wagon that ten horses could hardly pull and sent it to King Vladislaus I of Hungary to Buda.
1443–1444 Long campaign
The Long Campaign of John Hunyad against the Ottomans (Chronica Hungarorum, 1488)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Temporary Hungarian victories.
1443 Battle of Nish Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Poland
Serbian Despotate
Wallachia
Moldavia
Ottoman Empire Crusader Victory
1443 Battle of Zlatitsa Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Poland
Serbian Despotate
Papal States
Ottoman Empire Ottoman victory, halting of the Crusader advance
1444 Battle of Kunovica
John Hunyadi
John Hunyadi, Regent-Governor of the Kingdom of Hungary and General of Hungarian army (17th century)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Poland
Serbian Despotate
Ottoman Empire Crusader Victory
1444 Battle of Varna
King Władysław III of Poland / Vladislaus I of Hungary in the Battle of Varna (painting by Jan Matejko, 1879)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Poland
Kingdom of Croatia
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Crown of Bohemia
Wallachia
Bulgarian rebels
Kingdom of Bosnia
Papal States
Teutonic Knights
Ottoman Empire Crusader defeat
  • Vladislaus I of Hungary, the young king, ignoring Hunyadi's advice, rushed 500 of his Polish knights against the Ottoman center. They attempted to overrun the Janissary infantry and take Murad II prisoner, and almost succeeded, but in front of Murad's tent Vladislaus's horse either fell, and the king was slain.
  • Murad's casualties at Varna were so heavy, it was not until three days later that he realized he was victorious.
  • The Ottoman victory in Varna, followed by the Ottoman victory in the Second Battle of Kosovo in 1448, deterred the European states from sending any substantial military assistance to the Byzantines during the Ottoman Siege of Constantinople in 1453.
1447 Wallachian campaign Kingdom of Hungary Wallachia
Ottoman Empire
Hungarian victory
1448 Second Battle of Kosovo / Rigómező
An akinji is dragging an incapacitated Hungarian knight (Süleymanname, 16th century)
Kingdom of Hungary
Wallachia
Ottoman Empire
Wallachia (Switched to the Ottoman side on the third day of the battle)[35][36][37][38][39]
Ottoman victory
1456 Siege of Belgrade / Nándorfehérvár
The self-sacrifice of Titusz Dugovics (painting by Sándor Wagner, 1853)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
  • The Siege of Belgrade was a major issue for the entire Europe, especially after the fall of Constantinople in 1453. The fall of the fortress city of Belgrade would have opened the gates of Europe to the Turks and that would have certainly changed the history of the world.
  • The Battle of Belgrade deserves to be remembered. Hungarians played a key role in the defense of Europe against the invasion of the Turks in the 15th century.
  • Pope Callixtus III ordered the bells of every European church to be rung every day at noon, as a call for believers to pray for the defenders of the city. But because in many European countries the news of victory arrived before the Pope's order for prayer, the ringing of the church bells was believed to be in celebration of the victory. Therefore, the significance of the church bells ringing is now the commemoration of Hunyadi's victory against the Turks.
  • Plague broke out in the camp, from which John Hunyadi himself died three weeks later.
1458–1459 Matthias I's war with Ján Jiskra Kingdom of Hungary Jiskra's soldiers Royal victory
1458–1465 War in Bosnia Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Partial Bosnian territory occupied by the Ottoman Empire.
1460 Battle at Pojejena / Alsópozsgás Troops of Michael Szilágyi Ottoman raiding army of Ali Bey Mihaloğlu Ottoman victory
1464 Siege of Jajce Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1465–1471 Hussite uprising in North-Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Czech hussite rebels Hungarian victory
1467 Hungarian - Moldavian war Kingdom of Hungary Moldavia Moldavian victory [40][41]
1468–1478 Bohemian War (1468-1478) Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Bohemia Treaty of Olmütz, Matthias became king of Bohemia
1471 Hungarian – Polish war. King Matthias I forced King Casimir IV to withdraw from Hungary Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Poland Hungarian victory
1471–1476 Matthias's intervention in the Moldovian – Ottoman War Kingdom of Hungary
Moldavia
Ottoman Empire After initial Hungarian-moldavian victories Hungary stopped the advocating of Moldavia, so Stephen III moldavian ruler became vasal of the Ottoman Empire.
1474 Siege of Wrocław / Breslau / Boroszló Kingdom of Hungary Kingdom of Poland
Kingdom of Bohemia
Between 1469 and 1490, Wrocław was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In 1474, the city was besieged by combined Polish–Czech forces. Kings Casimir IV of Poland, his son Vladislaus II of Bohemia, and Matthias Corvinus of Hungary met in the nearby village, and a ceasefire was signed according to which the city remained under Hungarian rule.
1475 Battle of Vaslui Moldavia
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Poland
Ottoman Empire
Wallachia
Moldavian–Hungarian–Polish victory
1476 Siege of Šabac / Szabács Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire King Matthias besieged and seized Šabac, an important Ottoman border fort
1479 Battle of Breadfield / Kenyérmező
Battle of Breadfield (Colorized lithography from Eduard Gurk after Ion Osolsobie, 19th century)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire
Wallachia
Hungarian victory
  • Hungary defeats the highly outnumbered Ottoman army in Transylvania. Ottoman casualties were extremely high. The battle was the most significant victory for the Hungarians against the raiding Ottomans, and as a result, the Ottoman Turks did not attack southern Hungary and Transylvania for many years thereafter.
1480–1481 Battle of Otranto Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Naples
Crown of Aragon
Kingdom of Sicily
Papal States
Ottoman Empire Christian victory
1482–1488 Austrian – Hungarian War Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Decisive Hungarian victory
  • At the end of the campaign, Hungary controlled all of Upper Austria as well, which remained under the control of King Matthias until his death, in 1490.
1482 Siege of Hainburg Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1485 Siege of Vienna / Bécs
The triumphant Matthias (painting by Gyula Benczúr, 1919)
Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
  • The Black Army captures Vienna. The city is then merged into Hungary from 1485 to 1490. where Matthias moved his royal court.
1486 Siege of Retz Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1486–1487 Siege of Wiener Neustadt / Bécsújhely Kingdom of Hungary Holy Roman Empire Hungarian victory
1490–1491 War of the Hungarian Succession Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Bohemia
Kingdom of Poland Treaty
1490 Battle of Csontmező The supporters of John Corvinus The supporters of Beatrice of Naples The supporters of Beatrice of Naples, Stephen Báthory and Paul Kinizsi defeated John Corvinus.
1491–1495 Hungarian – Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Stalemate
1492–1493 The Black Army's uprising Kingdom of Hungary Black Army Destruction of the Black Army
1499–1504 Hungarian – Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Stalemate
1512–1520 Hungarian – Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Successful defensive operations against the Ottomans
1514 Peasants revolt, led by György Dózsa
The execution of György Dózsa (Stephanus Taurinus: Stauromachia, id est, Cruciatorum servile bellum, 1519)
Kingdom of Hungary Peasants Revolt suppressed
  • Royal power declined in favour of the magnates, who used their power to curtail the peasants' freedom. Gyorgy led a revolt but was eventually caught, tortured, and executed and became known as a martyr or a dangerous criminal.[42]
1520–1526 Hungarian-Ottoman War Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian defeat
1523 Battle of Szávaszentdemeter Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory[43]
1526 Battle of Mohács
Discovering the Body of King Louis II of Hungary (painting by Bertalan Székely, 1860)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian defeat
  • Decisive downward turning point in Hungarian history.
  • Destruction of the Kingdom of Hungary as an independent and powerful European nation.
  • The territory of Hungary was split into two parts in 1529 and into three parts in 1541.
  • Around two hundred years of constant warfare with and between two empires, Habsburg and Ottoman, turned Hungary into a perpetual battlefield. The countryside was regularly ravaged by armies moving back and forth devastating the population.

Wars between 1526 and 1699

Date Conflict Allies Enemies Result
1526–1538 Hungarian Civil War
German tidings of the campaign of Ferdinand I, in Hungary, 1527
Kingdom of Hungary
Habsburg monarchy
Ottoman Empire
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Inconclusive
  • Treaty of Nagyvárad
  • Hungary officially split into two parts
  • Ottomans gain influence in Eastern Hungary
1526–1527 Jovan Nenad uprising Eastern Hungarian Kingdom Serbs of Vojvodina Hungarian victory
1532 Siege of Kőszeg / Güns
Siege of Güns (Edward Schön)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
  • Captain Jurisics Miklós defended the small border fort of Kőszeg with only 700–800 men (46 soldiers, 700 peasants) with no cannons and few guns, preventing the advance of the 120,000–140,000 strong Turkish army towards Vienna.
1532 Battle of Leobersdorf
Balkan Slavic Akindžije in Central Hungary, 16th century
Habsburg monarchy
Kingdom of Hungary
Ottoman Empire
Moldavia
Habsburg victory
  • Kazim Bey's Ottoman army was completely destroyed.
1540–1547 Habsburg–Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary
Habsburg monarchy
Ottoman Empire
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Ottoman victory
1543 Siege of Esztergom
Siege of Esztergom, (painting by Sebastian Vrancks)
Kingdom of Hungary

Habsburg monarchy

Ottoman Empire

Kingdom of France

Ottoman victory
1550–1558 Habsburg–Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary

Habsburg monarchy

Ottoman Empire Ottoman victory
1552 Siege of Eger
The Women of Eger (painting by Bertalan Székely, 1867)
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1562 First Székely uprising Eastern Hungarian Kingdom Székelys Eastern Hungarian victory
1564–1565 Hungarian war of succession[44]
John Sigismund pays homage to the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent at Zemun on 29 June 1566.
Royal Hungary
Habsburg monarchy
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Zápolya family
Habsburg victory; Treaty of Szatmár (13 March 1565):
1565–1568 Habsburg–Ottoman war Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Ottoman Empire
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Ottoman victory
1566 Siege of Szigetvár
Miklós IV Zrínyi's charge from the fortress of Szigetvár (painting by Johann Peter Krafft, 1825)
Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Croatia
Ottoman Empire
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Ottoman victory
  • Suleiman the Magnificent dies in his tent before the final assault.
  • The whole Hungarian-Croatian army (2300–3000) is killed, Miklós IV Zrínyi is killed in the final battle.
  • Miklós IV Zrínyi ordered a fuse be lit to the powder magazine. After cutting down the last of the defenders the Ottoman Army entered the remains of Szigetvár and fell into the trap. 3,000 Turks perished in the explosion.[46][47][48][49]
  • 20,000–30,000 Ottomans were killed.
  • Ottomans captured Szigetvár fortress and it became part of Budin Eyalet.
1575 Bekes uprising and the second Székely uprising Principality of Transylvania Kingdom of Hungary

Székelys

Transylvanian victory
1588 Battle of Szikszó
Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1593–1606 Fifteen Years' war
Allegory of the Turkish war – The declaration of war before Constantinople
Kingdom of Hungary
Habsburg monarchy

Principality of Transylvania

Wallachia

Moldavia

Ottoman Empire Inconclusive
1596 Third Székely uprising Principality of Transylvania Székelys Transylvanian victory
1595 Battle of Călugăreni
Battle of Călugăreni by Theodor Aman
Wallachia
Principality of Transylvania
Ottoman Empire Wallachian victory
1595 Battle of Giurgiu / Gyurgyevó
Sinan Pasha crosses the Danube in 1595
Principality of Transylvania
Wallachia
Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1596 Siege of Eger
Siege of Eger in 1596 (Abraham Ortelius, 16th century)
Kingdom of Hungary
Habsburg monarchy
Ottoman Empire Ottoman victory, Ottomans capture Eger
1604–1606 Bocskai's War of Independence
Hungarian Prince of Transilvania Stephen Bocskay and his hajdú warriors
Habsburg monarchy Hajduk

Principality of Transylvania

Rebel victory
1610–1611 Transylvanian Civil War Principality of Transylvania

Ottoman Empire

Wallachia

Moldavia

Transylvanian Saxons

Kingdom of Hungary

Transylvanian (Báthory) victory
1612–1613 Ottoman–Transylvanian war Principality of Transylvania (Báthorys)

Habsburg monarchy

Ottoman Empire

Wallachia

Moldavia

Ottoman victory
1618–1648 Thirty Years' war Habsburg Monarchy

Spanish Empire

Bavaria

Catholic League

Principality of Transylvania

Kingdom of Bohemia Swedish Empire France

Inconclusive
1632 Peasants revolt, led by Péter Császár (in Transylvania and in the Royal Hungary) Principality of Transylvania

Habsburg monarchy

Peasants Revolt crushed
1636 Transylvania Civil War Principality of Transylvania Ottoman Empire Transylvanian (Rákóczi) Victory
1652 Battle of Vezekény Kingdom of Hungary Ottoman Empire Hungarian victory
1656–1657 Transylvanian military campaign against Poland Swedish Empire
Principality of Transylvania
Poland–Lithuania Polish-Tatar Victory
1657–1662 Ottoman–Transylvanian war Principality of Transylvania Ottoman Empire Ottoman victory
1663–1664 Austro-Turkish War Habsburg monarchy Ottoman Empire Ottoman victory
1664 Siege of Léva
Siege of Léva (17th century)
Habsburg monarchy Ottoman Empire Habsburg – Hungarian victory
1664 Battle of Saint Gotthard
Battle of Saint Gotthard (17th century)
Habsburg monarchy Ottoman Empire League victory
1678–1685 Thököly Uprising
Arrest of Imre Thököly in 1685
Habsburg monarchy Principality of Upper Hungary Habsburg victory
1683–1699 Great Turkish War Habsburg monarchy

Holy Roman Empire

Ottoman Empire Holy League victory
1686 Siege of Buda
The recapture of Buda Castle in 1686 (painting by Gyula Benczúr, 1896)
Habsburg monarchy

Holy Roman Empire

Ottoman Empire Holy League victory
1697 Hegyalja uprising Habsburg monarchy