The Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee (DSOC) is a committee of the United States Senate dedicated to fostering dialogue between Senate Democrats and community leaders across the United States. The Steering Committee hosts several meetings each year with advocates, activists, policy experts, and elected officials to help the structuring of the Democrats' agenda in the United States Senate.[1]

Members, 116th Congress

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (March 2021)

After Bill Nelson lost his 2018 reelection bid,[2] he left the committee and his position was left unfilled.

Roster[3]
Senator State
Amy Klobuchar, Steering Chair Minnesota
Bernie Sanders, Outreach Chair Vermont
Jeanne Shaheen, Vice Chair New Hampshire
Chuck Schumer New York
Dick Durbin Illinois
Patrick Leahy Vermont
Kirsten Gillibrand New York
Chris Coons, Chair of Business Outreach Delaware
Bob Casey, Jr. Pennsylvania
Jon Tester Montana
Brian Schatz Hawaii
Tammy Baldwin Wisconsin
Bob Menendez, Chair of Hispanic Task Force New Jersey

Historical committee rosters

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115th Congress

Roster[4]
Senator State
Amy Klobuchar, Steering Chair Minnesota
Bernie Sanders, Outreach Chair Vermont
Jeanne Shaheen, Vice Chair New Hampshire
Chuck Schumer New York
Dick Durbin Illinois
Patrick Leahy Vermont
Kirsten Gillibrand New York
Chris Coons, Chair of Business Outreach Delaware
Bill Nelson Florida
Bob Casey, Jr. Pennsylvania
Jon Tester Montana
Brian Schatz Hawaii
Tammy Baldwin Wisconsin
Bob Menendez, Chair of Hispanic Task Force New Jersey

Chairpersons

Leadership
Term Senator State Ref.
108th Hillary Clinton New York
109th Hillary Clinton New York
110th Debbie Stabenow Michigan
111th Debbie Stabenow Michigan
112th Mark Begich Alaska
113th Mark Begich Alaska
114th Amy Klobuchar Minnesota
Steering Outreach
Term Senator State Senator State Ref.
115th Amy Klobuchar Minnesota Bernie Sanders Vermont [4][5]
116th Amy Klobuchar Minnesota Bernie Sanders Vermont [3][5]

History

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (March 2021)

In November 2008, following that year's presidential election, the committee, whose responsibilities include proposing chairmanships and committee assignments to be ratified by the Democratic caucus, considered stripping Connecticut senator Joe Lieberman of his Chairmanship of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs after he endorsed Republican senator John McCain in his 2008 presidential campaign. Many within the caucus expressed disappointment over his fervent support for McCain and his questioning of then-Democratic senator Barack Obama's qualifications to run for the position.[6] Ultimately, the caucus voted 42-13 to allow Lieberman to retain his chairmanship while sanctioning him to be removed from the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.[7]

In November 2016, after Democrat Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 United States presidential election, then-Senate Democratic Leader-elect Chuck Schumer announced Bernie Sanders would fill the newly-established position of Outreach Chair in the committee. Sanders came to prominence during the 2016 Democratic Party presidential primaries and his appointment was seen as a broader acknowledgment of his role in galvanizing the electorate. This made Sanders the first independent to hold a leadership position within the Democratic Party.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Democratic Steering & Outreach Committee". Senate Democrats.((cite news)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ Merica, Dan; Krieg, Gregory (November 19, 2018). "Bill Nelson concedes Florida Senate race to Rick Scott". CNN. Retrieved March 6, 2021.((cite news)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ a b "Democratic Steering & Outreach Committee". Senate Democrats. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Democratic Steering & Outreach Committee". Senate Democrats. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved March 6, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c Gaudiano, Nicole (November 17, 2016). "Senate Democrats tap Bernie Sanders to lead outreach". USA Today. Retrieved March 6, 2021.((cite news)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ Herszenhorn, David (November 7, 2008). "Among Democrats' Leadership Questions - What to Do With Lieberman?". The New York Times. Retrieved November 6, 2008.((cite news)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ Welna, David (November 19, 2008). "Lieberman Gets To Keep Committee Chairmanship". NPR. Retrieved March 6, 2021.((cite news)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)