2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries

← 2020 January 23 to June 8, 2024 2028 →

[a]
Opinion polls
 
Nominee Joe Biden Uncommitted[d]
Home state Delaware
Estimated delegate count 2,483[2][b] 20
Contests won 29 0
Popular vote 10,224,461[5] 466,582[5]
Percentage 86.6%[c] 4.0%

 
Nominee Dean Phillips
(withdrawn)
Jason Palmer
Home state Minnesota Maryland
Estimated delegate count 0 3
Contests won 0 1[e]
Popular vote 410,834[5] 9,767[5]
Percentage 3.5% 0.1%

2024 California Democratic presidential primary2024 Oregon Democratic presidential primary2024 Washington Democratic presidential primary2024 Idaho Democratic presidential primary2024 Nevada Democratic presidential primary2024 Utah Democratic presidential primary2024 Arizona Democratic presidential primary2024 Montana Democratic presidential primary2024 Wyoming Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Colorado Democratic presidential primary2024 New Mexico Democratic presidential primary2024 North Dakota Democratic presidential caucuses2024 South Dakota Democratic presidential primary2024 Nebraska Democratic presidential primary2024 Kansas Democratic presidential primary2024 Oklahoma Democratic presidential primary2024 Texas Democratic presidential primary2024 Minnesota Democratic presidential primary2024 Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Missouri Democratic presidential primary2024 Arkansas Democratic presidential primary2024 Louisiana Democratic presidential primary2024 Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary2024 Illinois Democratic presidential primary2024 Michigan Democratic presidential primary2024 Indiana Democratic presidential primary2024 Ohio Democratic presidential primary2024 Kentucky Democratic presidential primary2024 Tennessee Democratic presidential primary2024 Mississippi Democratic presidential primary2024 Alabama Democratic presidential primary2024 Georgia Democratic presidential primary2024 Florida Democratic presidential primary2024 South Carolina Democratic presidential primary2024 North Carolina Democratic presidential primary2024 Virginia Democratic presidential primary2024 West Virginia Democratic presidential primary2024 District of Columbia Democratic presidential primary2024 Maryland Democratic presidential primary2024 Delaware Democratic presidential primary2024 Pennsylvania Democratic presidential primary2024 New Jersey Democratic presidential primary2024 New York Democratic presidential primary2024 Connecticut Democratic presidential primary2024 Rhode Island Democratic presidential primary2024 Vermont Democratic presidential primary2024 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary2024 Maine Democratic presidential primary2024 Massachusetts Democratic presidential primary2024 Alaska Democratic presidential primary2024 Hawaii Democratic presidential primary2024 Puerto Rico Democratic presidential primary2024 U.S. Virgin Islands Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Northern Mariana Islands Democratic presidential caucuses2024 American Samoa Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Guam Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Democrats Abroad presidential primary
2024 California Democratic presidential primary2024 Oregon Democratic presidential primary2024 Washington Democratic presidential primary2024 Idaho Democratic presidential primary2024 Nevada Democratic presidential primary2024 Utah Democratic presidential primary2024 Arizona Democratic presidential primary2024 Montana Democratic presidential primary2024 Wyoming Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Colorado Democratic presidential primary2024 New Mexico Democratic presidential primary2024 North Dakota Democratic presidential caucuses2024 South Dakota Democratic presidential primary2024 Nebraska Democratic presidential primary2024 Kansas Democratic presidential primary2024 Oklahoma Democratic presidential primary2024 Texas Democratic presidential primary2024 Minnesota Democratic presidential primary2024 Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Missouri Democratic presidential primary2024 Arkansas Democratic presidential primary2024 Louisiana Democratic presidential primary2024 Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary2024 Illinois Democratic presidential primary2024 Michigan Democratic presidential primary2024 Indiana Democratic presidential primary2024 Ohio Democratic presidential primary2024 Kentucky Democratic presidential primary2024 Tennessee Democratic presidential primary2024 Mississippi Democratic presidential primary2024 Alabama Democratic presidential primary2024 Georgia Democratic presidential primary2024 Florida Democratic presidential primary2024 South Carolina Democratic presidential primary2024 North Carolina Democratic presidential primary2024 Virginia Democratic presidential primary2024 West Virginia Democratic presidential primary2024 District of Columbia Democratic presidential primary2024 Maryland Democratic presidential primary2024 Delaware Democratic presidential primary2024 Pennsylvania Democratic presidential primary2024 New Jersey Democratic presidential primary2024 New York Democratic presidential primary2024 Connecticut Democratic presidential primary2024 Rhode Island Democratic presidential primary2024 Vermont Democratic presidential primary2024 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary2024 Maine Democratic presidential primary2024 Massachusetts Democratic presidential primary2024 Alaska Democratic presidential primary2024 Hawaii Democratic presidential primary2024 Puerto Rico Democratic presidential primary2024 U.S. Virgin Islands Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Northern Mariana Islands Democratic presidential caucuses2024 American Samoa Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Guam Democratic presidential caucuses2024 Democrats Abroad presidential primary

Previous Democratic nominee

Joe Biden

Presumptive Democratic nominee

Joe Biden

Presidential primaries and caucuses are being organized by the Democratic Party to select the delegates to the 2024 Democratic National Convention, to determine the party's nominee for president in the 2024 United States presidential election. The elections will take place in most U.S. states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and Democrats Abroad, and will be held between January and June that year.[6] Incumbent President Joe Biden is running for re-election with Vice President Kamala Harris returning as his running mate.[7] On March 12, Biden secured enough delegates for re-nomination and was declared the presumptive candidate of the Democratic Party.[8]

While Biden had repeatedly expressed his intent to run for re-election since 2021, there was speculation in the first two years of his presidency that he might not seek re-election due to his age and low approval ratings.[9][10] Former Democratic House representatives including Carolyn Maloney,[11] Joe Cunningham[12] and Tim Ryan[13] had publicly said Biden should not run. There had been speculation that Biden may face a primary challenge, especially from a member of the Democratic Party's progressive faction.[14][15]

After Democrats outperformed expectations in the 2022 midterm elections, many believed the chances that Biden would run for and win his party's nomination had increased.[16][17] On April 25, 2023, Biden announced via a video that he would be running for re-election.[18]

Eventually, three main primary opponents emerged; self-help author Marianne Williamson declared her candidacy in March 2023.[19] Anti-vaccine activist and environmental attorney Robert F. Kennedy Jr.[20] declared in April,[21] while Representative Dean Phillips declared in October.[22] Additionally, in 2024, some Muslim Americans and progressives began advocating for a ‘uncommitted’ vote as protest vote against Biden due to his support of Israel during the Israel–Hamas war.[23][24]

Kennedy withdrew from the Democratic primaries in October 2023 to run as an independent candidate.[25] Williamson suspended her campaign following the Nevada primary in February 2024,[26] before unsuspending her campaign following the Michigan primary later that month.[27] On March 6, 2024, Phillips suspended his campaign and endorsed Joe Biden.[28]

Biden lost American Samoa to venture capitalist Jason Palmer,[e] becoming the first incumbent president to lose a contest while appearing on the ballot since Jimmy Carter in 1980.[29] However, he has swept every other contest, maintains a significant lead in polls,[30] and no incumbent president has lost nomination since 1884.[31][32]

Results

Main article: Results of the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries

Map legend

Candidates

Main article: 2024 Democratic Party presidential candidates

As of March 2024, more than 180 candidates have filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2024.[33]

Presumptive nominee

Declared major candidates for the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Contests won Delegates won Total popular vote Running mate Ref

Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 81)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
President of the United States
(2021–present)

Vice President of the United States
(2009–2017)
U.S. Senator from Delaware
(1973–2009)
Delaware
Campaign

April 25, 2023
FEC filing[34]
Website
Secured nomination:
March 12, 2024

29
(AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, DA, GA, HI, IA, IL, KS, MA, ME, MI, MN, MS, MP, NV, NH[f], NC, OH[g], OK, SC, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, DE,[h] FL[h])
2,465
(99.0%)
10,224,461 (86.6%) Kamala Harris[35] [36]

Other declared major candidates

Other declared major candidates for the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Contests won Delegates won Total popular vote Ref

Jason Palmer
December 1, 1971
(age 52)
Aberdeen, Maryland
Venture capitalist Maryland
Campaign
October 22, 2023
FEC filing[37]
Website
1
(AS)
3[38]
(0.1%)
9,767 (0.1%) [39]

Marianne Williamson
July 8, 1952
(age 71)
Houston, Texas
Author
Founder of Project Angel Food
Candidate for president in 2020
California
Campaign
March 4, 2023[i]
FEC filing[40]
Website
None 0
(0.0%)
380,035 (3.5%) [19]
[41]
[42]

Alternate ballot options

Alternate ballot options
Name Bound
delegates
Popular
vote
Uncommitted 20 (0.9%) 466,539 (4.0%)

Withdrew during the primaries

Withdrawn major candidates for the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Campaign Bound
delegates
Contests
won
Popular
vote
Ref.

Dean Phillips
January 20, 1969
(age 55)
Saint Paul, Minnesota
U.S. Representative from MN-03
(2019–present)

CEO of Phillips Distilling Company
(2000–2012)
Minnesota October 26, 2023 March 6, 2024
(endorsed Biden)

Campaign
FEC filing[43]
Website
0 (0.0%) None 410,771 (3.5%) [44]
[45]

Withdrew before the primaries

Major candidates who withdrew before the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Campaign Total popular vote Ref.

Robert F.
Kennedy Jr.
January 17, 1954
(age 69)
Washington, D.C.
Environmental lawyer
Founder of Children's Health Defense
Founder of Waterkeeper Alliance
California April 19, 2023 October 9, 2023
(running as an independent)

Campaign
FEC filing[46][47]
Website
439 (nil%) [48][49]

Vice-presidential candidate selection

Kamala Harris, incumbent vice president

On January 19, 2022, President Biden confirmed that Vice President Kamala Harris will again be his running mate in his 2024 re-election campaign.[50]

Some Democrats expressed skepticism about Biden choosing Harris again as his running mate, as she has also seen similar low approval ratings to Biden. In January 2023, U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren said in a radio interview that she supported Biden's reelection bid, but stopped short of supporting Harris.[51] She later clarified her position, saying she supported the Biden–Harris ticket.[52]

Primaries and caucus calendar

Caucuses and primaries in the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Date[53] Total
delegates
Primaries/caucuses
January 23 None New Hampshire primary[j]
February 3 55 South Carolina primary
February 6 36 Nevada primary
February 27 117 Michigan primary
March 5
(Super Tuesday)
1420
52 Alabama primary
6 American Samoa caucuses
31 Arkansas primary
424 California primary
72 Colorado primary
40 Iowa caucuses[k]
24 Maine primary
92 Massachusetts primary
75 Minnesota primary
116 North Carolina primary
36 Oklahoma primary
63 Tennessee primary
244 Texas primary
30 Utah primary
16 Vermont primary
99 Virginia primary
March 6 24 Hawaii caucuses
March 12 254
13 Democrats Abroad primary
108 Georgia primary
35 Mississippi primary
6 Northern Marianas caucuses
92 Washington primary
March 19 379 72 Arizona primary
147 Illinois primary
33 Kansas primary
127 Ohio primary
March 23 112
48 Louisiana primary
64 Missouri primary
March 30 13 North Dakota primary
April 2 455
60 Connecticut primary
268 New York primary
26 Rhode Island primary
82 Wisconsin primary
April 13 28 15 Alaska caucuses
13 Wyoming caucuses
April 23 159 Pennsylvania primary
April 28 55 Puerto Rico primary
May 7 79 Indiana primary
May 14 144
95 Maryland primary
29 Nebraska primary
20 West Virginia primary
May 21 119
53 Kentucky primary
66 Oregon primary
May 23 23 Idaho caucuses
June 4 216
20 Washington D.C. primary
20 Montana primary
126 New Jersey primary
34 New Mexico primary
16 South Dakota primary
June 8 13
6 Guam caucuses
7 Virgin Islands caucuses

Ballot access

The following is a table for which candidates have received ballot access in which states. Yes indicates that the candidate was on the ballot for the primary contest, Dropped indicates that the candidate was a recognized write-in candidate, and No indicates that the candidate did not appear on the ballot in that state's contest. Maybe indicates that a candidate withdrew before the election but was still listed on the ballot. If a state does not appear in the table, the filing deadline in the state has not passed.

Ballot access in the 2024 Democratic presidential nominating contests
Contest Date Biden Palmer Williamson Phillips Others Uncommitted[n] Ref
New Hampshire[o] Jan 23 Write-in Yes Yes Yes Yes[A] No [57][58]
South Carolina Feb 3 Yes No Yes Yes No No [59]
Nevada Feb 6 Yes Yes Yes No Yes[B] Yes [60]
Michigan Feb 27 Yes No Yes-withdrawn Yes No Yes [61]
Alabama Mar 5 Yes No No Yes No Yes [62]
American Samoa Yes Yes No Yes No Yes [63]
Arkansas Yes No Yes Yes Yes[C] No [64][65]
California Yes No Yes Yes Yes[D] No [66][67]
Colorado Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes[E] Yes [68]
Iowa[p] Yes No Yes Yes No Yes [69]
Maine Yes No No Yes No No [70]
Massachusetts Yes No Yes Yes No Yes [71]
Minnesota Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes[F] Yes [72]
North Carolina Yes No No No No Yes [73]
Oklahoma Yes No Yes Yes Yes[G] No [74]
Tennessee Yes No No No No Yes [75]
Texas Yes No Yes Yes Yes[H] No [76]
Utah Yes No Yes Yes Yes[I] No [77]
Vermont Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes[J] No [78]
Virginia Yes No Yes Yes No No [79]
Hawaii Mar 6 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes[K] Yes [80]
Democrats Abroad[r] Mar 12 Yes No Yes No No Yes [81]
Georgia Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No No [82]
Mississippi Yes No No No No No [83]
Northern Mariana Islands[r] Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn No No [84]
Washington Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No Yes [85]
Arizona Mar 19 Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[L] No [86]
Illinois Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[M] No [87]
Kansas Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn No Yes [88]
Ohio Yes No No Yes-withdrawn No No [89]
Louisiana Mar 23 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[N] No [90]
Missouri Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[O] Yes [91]
North Dakota Mar 30 Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[P] No [92]
Connecticut Apr 2 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[Q] Yes [93]
New York Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No No [94]
Rhode Island Yes No No Yes-withdrawn No Yes [95]
Wisconsin Yes No No Yes-withdrawn No Yes [96][97]
Alaska Apr 13 Yes No No No No No [98]
Wyoming Yes Yes Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[R] Yes [99]
Pennsylvania Apr 23 Yes No No Yes-withdrawn No No [100]
Puerto Rico Apr 28 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No No [101]
Indiana May 7 Yes No No No No No [102]
Maryland May 14 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No Yes [103]
Nebraska Yes No No Yes-withdrawn No No [104]
West Virginia Yes Yes No Yes-withdrawn Yes[S] No [105]
Kentucky May 21 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn No Yes [106]
Oregon Yes No Yes No No No [107]
District of Columbia Jun 4 Yes No Yes Yes-withdrawn Yes[T] No [108]
Delaware None[s] [109][110]
Florida [111]
Total possible delegates TBD


Timeline

See also: Timeline of the 2024 United States presidential election

This section needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (February 2024)

Overview

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. 2024 presidential campaignJason Palmer 2024 presidential campaignDean Phillips 2024 presidential campaignMarianne Williamson 2024 presidential campaignJoe Biden 2024 presidential campaign
Active campaign Exploratory committee Democratic National Convention
Withdrawn candidate Primaries

Early developments

Biden declared his intent in January 2022 to run for re-election, keeping Kamala Harris as his running mate.[7] On September 15, he told Scott Pelley in a CBS 60 Minutes interview that he had not yet committed to run.[112] In a private conversation with civil-rights activist Al Sharpton on October 3, he reportedly told Sharpton that he was seeking re-election.[113] On October 11, he told Jake Tapper in an interview on CNN that he would decide whether or not to seek re-election after the 2022 midterm elections.[114]

Throughout 2022, several prominent Democrats publicly urged Biden not to run for a second term. On June 23, shortly after winning the Democratic nomination in the South Carolina gubernatorial race, former U.S. Representative Joe Cunningham told CNN that he believed Biden would be too old by the end of his second term and should not run in 2024. CNN pointed out that Biden had endorsed Cunningham in his 2018 and 2020 campaigns.[12] In July, U.S. Representative Dean Phillips of Minnesota said he believed that Democrats should nominate someone from a younger generation in 2024, and fellow Minnesota Representative Angie Craig agreed with him the following week.[13] On August 1, then-U.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney told The New York Times that she thought Biden should not run in 2024 and that she believed he would not run. She later apologized and said that he should run again, though she reiterated her belief that he would not.[11] In September, U.S. Representative and Ohio U.S. Senate nominee Tim Ryan similarly called for a "generational move" away from Biden during an interview with a local TV station; Forbes Magazine noted that Biden, who had endorsed Ryan, headlined a rally with him just hours after the interview aired.[13]

In April 2023, Christale Spain became the first black woman to be the Chair of the South Carolina Democratic Party; with the responsibility of organizing the party's first-in-the-nation primary.[115]

Format changes

Democrats in Idaho, who held caucuses in 2012 and 2016 but switched to a firehouse primary by mail for the 2020 election, will switch back to in-person caucuses due to the abolition of the presidential primary by the Idaho Legislature in 2023.[116] Similarly, the abolition of the state-run presidential primary in Missouri in 2022 caused Democrats in Missouri to switch to a closed, ranked-choice firehouse presidential primary for 2024.[117]

Controversies

Primary schedule

See also: Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire presidential primary § "First primary" status and efforts to change

President Biden sent a letter on December 1, 2022, to the Democratic National Committee (DNC), requesting that diversity should be emphasized in the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries. On February 4, 2023, the DNC formally approved the new 2024 primary calendar, moving South Carolina to hold its race first on February 3, followed by Nevada and New Hampshire on February 6. One member of the Rules and Bylaws Committee who supported this new plan, Lee Saunders, further said it will give a better representation of the composition of the country.[118] Members of the Iowa Democratic Party and the New Hampshire Democratic Party opposed the move, since they would no longer be the first two states to hold their races.[119] The move was also criticized by some progressives, who argued that the move was intended to benefit more moderate candidates.[120][121] On October 6, the DNC and the Iowa Democratic Party reached a compromise in which the in-person caucuses could still be held in January, but delegate-determining mail-in voting would be held through Super Tuesday, March 5.[122] The DNC and the New Hampshire Democratic Party did not reach a compromise. In October 2023, the manager for the Biden campaign, Julie Chávez Rodriguez, confirmed in a letter to the chair of the New Hampshire Democratic Party Raymond Buckley that Biden would not appear on the primary ballot in order to comply with the DNC's calendar.[123] Pro-Biden New Hampshire Democrats, including Kathy Sullivan (the former chairwoman of the state Democratic party) and former Representatives Paul Hodes and Carol Shea-Porter, launched a formal write-in campaign on October 30.[124]

Ballot access denials

The primaries in Florida and Delaware were cancelled, with Biden receiving all pledged delegates, while in North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Indiana, no candidates other than Biden will appear on the ballot, partially due to decisions by the state Democratic parties in those states.[125][126] The Philips and Williamson campaigns criticized the decisions as undemocratic.[127][128] The primary challengers had not received the necessary number of signatures in Tennessee[129][130] and North Carolina,[131] while the Florida Democratic Party stated that the challengers did not reach out to them until November 29, 2023, one day before the Florida Secretary of State's November 30 deadline to submit candidates, and the state party had already made its submission ahead of the deadline before November 29.[132][133] An attorney who supported Phillips[t] questioned why the state party did not contact the challengers when it made its submission ahead of the deadline.[135]

Debates and forums

Main article: 2024 Democratic Party presidential debates and forums

On December 6, 2023, TYT Network hosted a forum featuring primary candidates Williamson, Phillips and Uygur. Biden was invited but declined to attend. The candidates responded to the GOP debate being held in Tuscaloosa, which was scheduled to end at the same time. The discussion was moderated by John Iadarola, the main host of The Damage Report on the same network.[136]

On January 8, 2024, Williamson and Phillips participated in a debate hosted by New England College in Manchester, New Hampshire.[137] To qualify, candidates needed to be registered on the New Hampshire primary ballot and poll at more than five percent.[138] The debate was broadcast on satellite radio by Sirius XM[139] and was moderated by Josh McElveen, who was the former political director of WMUR.[140]

On January 12, 2024, NewsNation hosted a second forum featuring Williamson, Phillips and Uygur. Biden was invited but did not attend. The discussion was moderated by Dan Abrams.[141]

Endorsements

Joe Biden
Dean Phillips (withdrawn)
State representatives
Notable individuals
Newspapers
Marianne Williamson
State senators
State representatives
Local officials
Notable individuals
U.S. representatives
State legislators
Local officials
Notable individuals
Newspapers
Organizations
Labor unions
"Ceasefire"
State officials

Opinion polling

Main article: Opinion polling for the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries

This section is transcluded from Opinion polling for the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries. (edit | history)

Aggregate polls of declared candidates in the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Source of poll aggregation Dates administered Dates updated Joe Biden Dean Phillips Marianne Williamson Other/undecided[u] Margin
270 to Win January 25 – February 14, 2024 February 18, 2024 74.2% 5.6% 8.0% 12.2% Biden +66.2
FiveThirtyEight through February 14, 2024 February 18, 2024 75.1% 6.9% 18.0% Biden +68.2
Race to the WH through January 29, 2024 February 2, 2024 71.9% 7.2% 20.9% Biden +64.7
Real Clear Polling December 26, 2023 – February 14, 2024 February 18, 2024 72.7% 4.7% 7.0% 15.6% Biden +65.7
Average 73.5% 5.7% 7.4% 13.4% Biden +66.1

Campaign finance

Main article: Fundraising in the 2024 United States presidential election

This is an overview of the money used by each campaign as it is reported to the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Totals raised include individual contributions, loans from the candidate, and transfers from other campaign committees. Individual contributions are itemized (catalogued) by the FEC when the total value of contributions by an individual comes to more than $200. The last column, Cash On Hand, shows the remaining cash each campaign had available for its future spending as of December 31, 2023. Campaign finance reports for the first quarter of 2024 will become available on April 15, 2024.[210]

This table does not include contributions made to Super PACs or party committees supporting the candidate. Each value is rounded up to the nearest dollar.

  Candidate who withdrew prior to December 31
  Candidate who withdrew following December 31
Overview of campaign financing for candidates in the 2024 Democratic Party presidential primaries through December 31, 2023
Candidate Total raised Total raised
since last quarter
Individual contributions Debt Spent Spent since
last quarter
Cash on hand
Total Unitemized Pct
Biden[211] $105,875,492 $33,037,210 $25,975,051 $14,305,517 55.1% $0 $92,354,198 $19,259,279 $45,958,298[v]
Palmer[212] $294,625 $29,625 $3,015 10.2% $265,000 $163,401 $131,223
Williamson[213] $3,854,375 $1,339,016 $3,355,377 $1,616,210 48.2% $593,030 $3,645,484 $1,231,291 $208,892
Phillips[214] $5,016,238 $1,016,218 $225,927 22.2% $4,236,430 $4,656,238 $360,000
Kennedy[215] $22,115,682 $7,037,153 $22,080,359 $7,034,122 31.9% $0 $16,676,899 $7,770,412 $5,438,782[w]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ 2,337 of 4,672 delegates needed to win any subsequent ballots at a contested convention lasting more than a single round of balloting. As of March 2024, the number of extra unpledged delegates (superdelegates), who after the first ballot at a contested convention participate in any subsequently needed nominating ballots (together with the 3,934 pledged delegates), is expected to be 738, but the exact number of superdelegates is still subject to change due to possible deaths, resignations, accessions, or elections as a pledged delegate.[1]
  2. ^ This total excludes three delegates allocated by the AP to Biden in Washington state which remain uncalled by Edison Research/National Election Pool (ABC News, CBS News, CNN, and NBC News). While all 92 pledged delegates from Washington state were called for Biden on election night, it is likely that this allocation of delegates will be partially retracted as uncommitted delegates is on track to pass 15% of the vote in at least one of two King County-based congressional districts given election night precinct-level data.[3][4]
  3. ^ Percentage of votes accounts for write-ins included by The Green Papers as well as an additional 20,888 write-in votes not included in their tracking, which have been reported by the offices of the Secretary of State in Minnesota and Vermont, as well as those collated by Edison Research in California, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Washington.
  4. ^ a b Includes "None of These Candidates" in Nevada; "noncommitted delegate" in Colorado; "no preference" in Massachusetts, Montana, and North Carolina; "undeclared" in Wyoming; "none of the names shown" in Kansas; "uninstructed delegation" in Wisconsin.
  5. ^ a b Although Biden and Palmer both earned three delegates from American Samoa, it is counted as a win for Palmer because he won the popular vote.
  6. ^ Primary not sanctioned by the DNC.
  7. ^ Some delegates remain unallocated
  8. ^ a b The primary was cancelled, and Biden was awarded all pledged delegates. However, they have not been officially bound yet.
  9. ^ Campaign suspended February 7, 2024; Campaign unsuspended February 28, 2024.
  10. ^ New Hampshire's delegates will not be awarded through this unofficial primary.[54] The early date violates the DNC-approved calendar, which confirmed South Carolina as the first primary state.[55]
  11. ^ Iowa's delegates were awarded through mail-in voting.[56]
  12. ^ Originally scheduled for March 19. The state party only nominated Joe Biden as a candidate, canceling the primary.
  13. ^ Originally scheduled for April 2. Only Joe Biden made the primary ballot, canceling the primary.
  14. ^ Includes "None of These Candidates" in Nevada; "noncommitted delegate" in Colorado; "no preference" in Massachusetts, Montana, and North Carolina; "undeclared" in Wyoming; "none of the names shown" in Kansas; "uninstructed delegation" in Wisconsin.
  15. ^ This primary has not been officially sanctioned by the DNC.
  16. ^ Iowa is holding an all mail-in caucus due to DNC rules. Mail-in voting occurs from January 12 to March 5.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g Uygur is not eligible to be president under the natural-born citizen clause of the United States Constitution.
  18. ^ a b Voting runs from March 5 to March 12.
  19. ^ Primary cancelled.
  20. ^ The attorney, Michael Steinberg, represented himself independently in the interest of getting Phillips on the ballot; he was not appointed by Phillips.[134]
  21. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  22. ^ Biden's principal campaign committee, Biden for President, was also used for his earlier 2020 presidential campaign. Some of these figures, therefore, include money left over from that previous candidacy.
  23. ^ These figures include data following Kennedy's withdrawal from the Democratic primary.
  1. ^ "President": R. Boddie, Terrisa Bukovinac, Eban Cambridge, Gabriel Cornejo, Mark Stewart Greenstein, Tom Koos, Paul V. LaCava, Star Locke, Frankie Lozada, Stephen P. Lyons, Raymond Michael Moroz, Derek Nadeau, Mando Perez-Serrato, Donald Picard, Paperboy Love Prince, Richard Rist, Vermin Supreme, John Vail
    Received votes as a write-in not counted as "scatter": Nikki Haley (running as a Republican), Donald Trump (running as a Republican), Vivek Ramaswamy (ran as a Republican), Ron DeSantis (ran as a Republican), Chris Christie (ran as a Republican), Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (running as an Independent), CeaseFire (not a candidate), Bernie Sanders (not a candidate)
  2. ^ Gabriel Cornejo, Superpayaseria Crystalroc, Brent Foutz, John Haywood, Stephen Alan Leon, Frankie Lozada, Stephen Lyons, Armando Perez-Serrato, Donald Picard, Mark R. Prascak
  3. ^ Frank Lozada, Stephen Lyons, Armando Perez-Serrato
  4. ^ "President": R. Boddie, Eban Cambridge, Gabriel Cornejo, Stephen P. Lyons, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato
    Recognized write-in candidates: Willie Felix Carter, President Cristina Nicole Grappo, Richard Gutierrez, James Mark Merts, Reed Michaelsen, Wayne Anthony Pope Sr.
  5. ^ Gabriel Cornejo, Frankie Lozada, Stephen P. Lyons, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato
  6. ^ Eban Cambridge, Gabriel Cornejo, Frankie Lozada, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato, Cenk Uygur[q]
  7. ^ Stephen Lyons, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato, Cenk Uygur[q]
  8. ^ Gabriel A. Cornejo, Edward Kimbrough, Robert Star Locke, Frankie Lozada, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato, Cenk Uygur[q]
  9. ^ Gabriel Cornejo, Frank Lozada
  10. ^ Mark Stewart Greenstein, Cenk Uygur[q]
  11. ^ Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato
  12. ^ Gabriel Cornejo, Frankie Lozada, Stephen Lyons
  13. ^ Frankie Lozada
  14. ^ "Bob" Ely, Frankie Lozada, Stephen Lyons, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato, Cenk Uygur[q]
  15. ^ Stephen Lyons, Armando "Mando" Perez-Serrato
  16. ^ Eban Cambridge, Stephen P. Lyons, Armando “Mando” Perez-Serrato, Cenk Uygur[q]
  17. ^ Cenk Uygur[q]
  18. ^ Stephen Lyons, David Michael Olscamp, Armando “Mando” Perez-Serrato
  19. ^ Stephen P. Lyons, Armando “Mando” Perez-Serrato
  20. ^ Armando “Mando” Perez-Serrato

References

  1. ^ "Democratic Convention 2024". The Green Papers.
  2. ^ "2024 Presidential Delegate Count". Associated Press. Retrieved March 19, 2024.
  3. ^ "Washington Presidential Primary Election Results 2024". NBC News. March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
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