Adelaide Oval
Adelaide Oval Logo.svg
Adelaide city centre view crop.jpg
The renovated Adelaide Oval in 2015
Full nameAdelaide Oval
LocationWar Memorial Drive
North Adelaide, South Australia
Australia
Coordinates34°54′56″S 138°35′46″E / 34.91556°S 138.59611°E / -34.91556; 138.59611Coordinates: 34°54′56″S 138°35′46″E / 34.91556°S 138.59611°E / -34.91556; 138.59611
OwnerSouth Australian Government
OperatorAdelaide Oval SMA Ltd
Capacity53,500[1]
Field size167 x 124 metres[2]
Opened1871
Tenants
Cricket

Australia (1884–present)
South Australia (1874–present)
Adelaide Strikers (2011–present)

Australian rules football

Adelaide (2014–present)
Port Adelaide (1975–1976, 2011, 2014–present)
South Adelaide (1882–1903, 1905–1994)

Rugby league
Adelaide Rams (1997–1998)
Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs (2010–2011)
Sydney Roosters (2017–2019)
Ground information
End names
River End
Cathedral End
International information
First Test12–16 December 1884:
 Australia v  England
Last Test16–20 December 2021:
 Australia v  England
First ODI20 December 1975:
 Australia v  West Indies
Last ODI15 January 2019:
 Australia v  India
First T20I12 January 2011:
 Australia v  England
Last T20I27 October 2019:
 Australia v  Sri Lanka
First women's Test15–18 January 1949:
 Australia v  England
Last women's Test18–20 February 2006:
 Australia v  India
First WODI3 February 1996:
 Australia v  New Zealand
Last WODI11 February 2010:
 Australia v  New Zealand
First WT20I12 January 2011:
 Australia v  England
Last WT20I22 January 2022:
 Australia v  England
As of 22 January 2022
Source: ESPN Cricinfo

Adelaide Oval is a sports ground in Adelaide, South Australia, located in the parklands between the city centre and North Adelaide. The venue is predominantly used for cricket and Australian rules football, but has also played host to rugby league, rugby union, soccer, tennis among other sports as well as regularly being used to hold concerts.[3] Austadiums.com described Adelaide Oval as being "one of the most picturesque Test cricket grounds in Australia, if not the world".[4] After the completion of the ground's most recent redevelopment in 2014, sports journalist Gerard Whateley described the venue as being "the most perfect piece of modern architecture because it's a thoroughly contemporary stadium with all the character that it's had in the past".[5]

Adelaide Oval has been headquarters to the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) since 1871 and South Australian National Football League (SANFL) since 2014.[6] The stadium is managed by the Adelaide Oval Stadium Management Authority (AOSMA). Its record crowd for cricket was 55,317 for the Second Ashes Test on 2 December 2017[7] and its record crowd for an Australian rules football match was 62,543 at the 1965 SANFL Grand Final between Port Adelaide and Sturt.

Development

Top: The Adelaide Oval grandstand built in 1883 for the following years test match against England
Second: Adelaide Oval grandstands in 1889
Third: View of the Oval in 2006, prior to the stadium's redevelopment
Bottom: The Oval in 2016.

In 1871 the ground was established after the formation of South Australian Cricket Association.[8]

During 1888 a switchback rollercoaster was constructed and was adjacent to Adelaide Oval where the present Riverbank Stand resides.[9]

In 1900 a picket fence was put in place around Oval's playing surface.

In 1911 the current Adelaide Oval scoreboard, designed by architect Kenneth Milne, began service.

In 1990 the Sir Donald Bradman Stand was built to replace the John Creswell stand and provided up to date facilities for spectators.

In 1997 lights were constructed at the ground allowing sport to be held at night. This was the subject of a lengthy dispute with the Adelaide City Council relating to the parklands area. The first towers erected were designed to retract into the ground; however one collapsed and they were replaced with permanent towers.

In 2003 two grandstands, named the Chappell Stands, after the South Australian cricketing brothers Ian Chappell, Greg Chappell and Trevor Chappell were completed.

Temporary stands were constructed for the 2006 Ashes Series to cope with demand. In August 2008 the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) announced that it had approved plans to redevelop the ground, involving expanding its capacity to 40,000. Development plans showed a reconfiguration of the playing surface and a remodelled western stand. The redevelopment would make the ground a viable option for hosting Australian Football League games as well as international soccer and rugby. The state and federal Governments each pledged $25m to the project, leaving the SACA to raise at least $45m. The SACA planned for the new stand to be ready in time for the 2010–11 Ashes series.[10] The South Australian government announced it would commit funding to redevelop Adelaide Oval into a multi-purpose sports facility that would bring AFL football to central Adelaide.[11] Announcing an agreement negotiated with SACA, SANFL and the AFL, the Rann Labor government committed $450 million to the project.[12]

The three original western stands were demolished (George Giffen stand (1882), Sir Edwin Smith stand (1922), Mostyn Evan stand (1920s)) were torn down in June 2009[13] and a single Western stand was developed in its place ahead of the 2010–11 Ashes series.[14] The Adelaide Oval Stadium Management Authority (AOSMA), a joint venture of SACA and the South Australian National Football League (SANFL), was registered as a company on 23 December 2009 following the re-announcement of the plan.[15] The AOSMA has eight directors, four associated with SACA (Ian McLachlan-Chair, John Harnden, Creagh O’Connor & John Bannon) and four with SANFL (Leigh Whicker-CEO, Rod Payze, Philip Gallagher & Jamie Coppins).[16]

In 2010 the new Western stand was completed incorporating 14,000 individual seats and features improved shading conditions and amenities for SACA members.[17] In the lead up to the 2010 state election, the opposition SA Liberals announced that, if elected, it would build with a new stadium with a roof, located at Riverside West at the site of the state government's new hospital location.[18][19] The incumbent SA Labor government subsequently announced it would fund a $450 million upgrade and redevelopment of the whole of Adelaide Oval, rather than just the Western Grand Stand.[20] Labor narrowly won re-election in 2010, resulting in its Adelaide Oval upgrade policy going ahead though eventually for a steeper $535 million, of which this deal included the State Government clearing the SACA's $85 million debt.[citation needed]

Adelaide Oval's western grandstand was redeveloped in 2010 retaining significant portions of the George Giffen stand (1882), Sir Edwin Smith stand (1922) and Mostyn Evan stand (1920s) structural facades.
Adelaide Oval's western grandstand was redeveloped in 2010 retaining significant portions of the George Giffen stand (1882), Sir Edwin Smith stand (1922) and Mostyn Evan stand (1920s) structural facades.

However, in early-mid-2010, prior to the election, it became clear that $450m would be inadequate. Following the 2010 state election, the Rann Labor government capped the State Government's commitment, stating: "It's $450 million – and not a penny more", and set a deadline for the parties to agree.[21] In May, Treasurer Kevin Foley announced that "the Government's final offer to the SANFL and SACA for the redevelopment" was $535 million, and the deadline was extended to August 2010.[22] Simultaneously, the SACA and the SANFL were in the process of negotiating an agreement that would enable Australian Rules Football (AFL) to use Adelaide Oval during the AFL season as their home ground.[23][24][25][26] In August 2010, SANFL and SACA representatives signed letters of intent committing to the project, including the capped $535 million offer from the state government.[27]

The redevelopment included a $40 million pedestrian bridge across the River Torrens to link the Adelaide railway station precinct with the Adelaide Oval precinct, which was partially completed for the Ashes cricket series in December 2013 and fully completed ahead of the 2014 AFL season.[28][29]

In early 2011, the AFL, SANFL, SACA, the SA Government and the Australian Government reached an agreement to upgrade Adelaide Oval. The SACA and the SANFL proposed, if SACA members vote yes on the upgrade in early May, that the whole Stadium will undergo redevelopment, except for the Northern Mound, the Moreton Bay Fig trees and the scoreboard, which will stay as it is because of it being under heritage listing. A three-quarters majority of SACA members were required to vote in favour of the proposed upgrade for it to ahead, with a successful vote resulting in the SANFL and AFL having control over the stadium for 7 months of the year and SACA having control for 5 months of the year.[citation needed]

SACA members had the choice of voting online on 28 April 2011 or attending in person an Extraordinary Meeting at the Adelaide Showgrounds on 2 May 2011. At 6 pm, 28 April 2011, It was announced that 60% of SACA members that voted online voted yes, 15% short of the majority vote needed for the upgrade to go ahead. At 10.15 pm, on 2 May 2011, at the Adelaide Showgrounds, the final result was announced. 80.37% of total votes cast were in favour of Adelaide Oval being redeveloped, resulting in the upgrade and stadium reconfiguration being approved.[30] In 2012 the two grandstands, named the Chappell Stands, after the South Australian cricketing brothers Ian Chappell, Greg Chappell and Trevor Chappell along with the Sir Donald Bradman stand were demolished.[citation needed]

The upgrade commenced in April 2012. By 2014 the new Eastern Stand was fully completed with a total capacity of 19,000, bringing the overall seating capacity of the stadium to 50,083 in time for the 2014 AFL season.[31][32]

All stands of the Oval were redeveloped and upgraded while the already rebuilt Western grandstand (SACA and SANFL members only stand) had modifications to improve sightlines for some seats and the addition of a new media center and AFL standard interchange benches, the Northern Mound had its seating capacity increased, and the Historic Scoreboard and the Moreton Bay fig trees remained untouched. The Northern Mound, the Moreton Bay fig trees and the Scoreboard are all heritage listed and will likely never be demolished unless damaged beyond repair.[33] This is the only manual scoreboard still operating in major Australasian cricket venues. Due to the 10-letter limit, some names had to be truncated, or be replaced by nicknames.[34] Following a vote by SACA members in favour of the redevelopment of the oval, the South Australian government increased its funding commitment to $535 million.[35]

SACA members vote[36]
Concerns redevelopment of Adelaide Oval†
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
10,078 80.37
No 2,461 19.63
Total votes 12,539 100.00

† Note that a 75% threshold was required in order for approval to be granted.

Layout

Adelaide Oval in 2014
Adelaide Oval in 2014

The oval dimensions were originally 190m x 125m,[37] both unusually long and unusually narrow for an Australian cricket/football ground. The arrangement was highly favourable for batsmen who played square of the wicket, and heavily penalised bowlers who delivered the ball short or wide so that the batsman could play cut, hook or pull shots. Before the far ends in front of and behind the wicket were roped off, making the playing area shorter, it was not uncommon for batsmen to hit an all-run four or even occasionally a five.[38]

Pitch

The Adelaide Oval pitch runs North-South. Historically, Adelaide Oval's integral pitch was generally very good for batting, and offering little assistance to bowlers until the last day of a match. Since the redevelopment in 2013, a drop-in pitch has been used at the venue.[39]

Oval

With the 2011–2014 redevelopment completed, the oval dimensions changed to 183m x 134m, making it more suitable for Australian Rules Football, for which the playing field dimensions will be 167m x 124m.

The Hill

The Hill was created in 1898 with earth from the banks of the River Torrens. The Hill for almost all sporting events at the ground is general admission and is often home to the most vocal supporters during cricket matches. The ease of people congregating on The Hill and the proximity to the Adelaide Oval Scoreboard bar is often cited as the reason why the most enthusiastic cricket supporters and barrackers choose The Hill to watch matches.[citation needed]

Scoreboard

The Adelaide Oval scoreboard during an Ashes Test
The Adelaide Oval scoreboard during an Ashes Test

The current scoreboard located on The Hill was first used in 1911 and still shows its original Edwardian architecture. The scoreboard is listed on the City of Adelaide Heritage Register, helping to maintain the charm of the ground. There is a bar located under the scoreboard.

Members' stands

The members' stands were the first section of the ground completed in the most recent redevelopment of Adelaide Oval. They retain significant portions of the original members' stand such as the brick archways and long room. The three segments are named after South Australian Cricket identities; from North to South named Sir Edwin Smith Stand, Sir Donald Bradman Pavilion and the Chappell Stand.

Riverbank stand

The Riverbank stand is the southern stand of Adelaide Oval, gaining its name from the River Torrens which is behind it.

Eastern stands

The Eastern Stands hold 19,000 spectators. The five segments are named after South Australian Australian rules football identities; from North to South named Gavin Wanganeen Stand, Jack Oatey Stand, Max Basheer Stand, Fos Williams Stand, and Mark Ricciuto Stand.

Cricket

International cricket

In 1874 a side representing England led by W.G. Grace defeated a South Australian side by 7 wickets in what was the first international cricket match at the ground
In 1874 a side representing England led by W.G. Grace defeated a South Australian side by 7 wickets in what was the first international cricket match at the ground
Adelaide Oval during the 2008 Test series between Australia and India. Sachin Tendulkar can be seen fielding in the left of the image.
Adelaide Oval during the 2008 Test series between Australia and India. Sachin Tendulkar can be seen fielding in the left of the image.
Adelaide Oval during a day–night match for the 2015 Cricket World Cup
Adelaide Oval during a day–night match for the 2015 Cricket World Cup

Adelaide Oval hosts some of the many exciting events in the cricketing calendar – including the annual Australia Day One Day International on 26 January (replacing a traditional Australia Day test) and every 4 years, one of the 5 Ashes test matches against England. The tests are now normally held in early December and is a clash between Australia and the international touring team of that particular season. Adelaide Oval was the host of the first ever day/night Test match, when Australia played New Zealand on 27 November 2015.[citation needed]

In 2011, Adelaide Oval held its first Twenty20 International between Australia and England, a match which England won by 1 wicket. The ground was announced as one of the venues for the 2022 ICC Men's T20 World Cup, and will host one of the semi-finals.[40]

Domestic cricket

Adelaide Oval is the home ground for the first-class South Australian state cricket team, The West End Southern Redbacks and Twenty20 cricket team, the Adelaide Strikers. The Strikers compete in the Big Bash League. The Southern Redbacks compete in the Sheffield Shield and JLT One Day Cup

Cricket timeline

Test cricket records

Ricky Ponting holds the record for most career runs at the Adelaide Oval.
Ricky Ponting holds the record for most career runs at the Adelaide Oval.
Brian Lara scored 610 runs in 8 innings at the ground; a record for non-Australians.
Brian Lara scored 610 runs in 8 innings at the ground; a record for non-Australians.
Michael Clarke scored seven centuries from 17 innings.
Michael Clarke scored seven centuries from 17 innings.

Batting

Most career runs[47]
Runs Player Period
1,743 (31 innings) Australia Ricky Ponting 1996–2012
1,415 (29 innings) Australia Allan Border 1979–1994
1,414 (17 innings) Australia Michael Clarke 2004–2014
1,153 (17 innings) Australia David Warner 2012–2021
1,056 (26 innings) Australia Steve Waugh 1986–2003
Most career runs (non-Australia)[48]
Runs Player Period
610 (8 innings) Cricket West Indies Brian Lara 1993–2005
601 (10 innings) England Jack Hobbs 1908–1929
552 (10 innings) Cricket West Indies Viv Richards 1976–1989
509 (8 innings) India Virat Kohli 2012–2020
482 (8 innings) England Wally Hammond 1929–1947
Highest individual scores[49]
Runs Player Date
335* v. Pakistan Australia David Warner 29 Nov 2019
299* v. South Africa Australia Don Bradman 29 Jan 1932
242 v. India Australia Ricky Ponting 12 Dec 2003
233 v. Australia India Rahul Dravid 12 Dec 2003
230 v. South Africa Australia Michael Clarke 22 Nov 2012
Most centuries[50]
Centuries Player Period
7 (17 innings) Australia Michael Clarke 2004–2014
6 (31 innings) Australia Ricky Ponting 1995–2012
4 (15 innings) Australia David Warner 2012–2019
4 (23 innings) Australia David Boon 1984–1996
4 (29 innings) Australia Allan Border 1979–1994
Highest batting average (5+ innings)[51]
Average Player Period
128.25 (5 innings, 1 NO) Australia Lindsay Hassett 1947–1953
107.77 (11 innings, 2 NO) Australia Don Bradman 1929–1948
99.60 (10 innings, 5 NO) Australia Brad Haddin 2008–2014
97.20 (6 innings, 1 NO) Australia Jack Ryder 1921–1929
94.26 (17 innings, 2 NO) Australia Michael Clarke 2004–2014

Bowling

Shane Warne has taken the joint-most wickets at the ground, with 56, along with Nathan Lyon.
Shane Warne has taken the joint-most wickets at the ground, with 56, along with Nathan Lyon.
Most career wickets[52]
Wickets Player Period
56 (21 innings) Australia Nathan Lyon 2012–2021
56 (26 innings) Australia Shane Warne 1992–2006
46 (20 innings) Australia Glenn McGrath 1996–2006
45 (17 innings) Australia Dennis Lillee 1971–1983
42 (15 innings) Australia Craig McDermott 1985–1996
Kapil Dev took 19 wickets in ten innings; the most of any non-Australian.
Kapil Dev took 19 wickets in ten innings; the most of any non-Australian.
Most career wickets (non-Australia)[53]
Wickets Player Period
19 (10 innings) England James Anderson 2006–2021
19 (6 innings) India Kapil Dev 1981–1992
16 (6 innings) India Ravichandran Ashwin 2012–2020
16 (5 innings) England Johnny Briggs 1884–1898
16 (6 innings) Cricket West Indies Lance Gibbs 1961–1976
Best innings figures[54]
Figures Player Date
8/43 v. England Australia Albert Trott 11 Jan 1895
8/59 v. Pakistan Australia Ashley Mallett 22 Dec 1972
8/106 v. Australia India Kapil Dev 13 Dec 1985
8/112 v. West Indies Australia Geoff Lawson 7 Dec 1984
8/126 v. Australia England Jack White 1 Feb 1929
Best match figures[55]
Figures Player Date
14/199 v. South Africa Australia Clarrie Grimmett 29 Jan 1932
13/256 v. Australia England Jack White 1 Feb 1929
12/136 v. Australia England Johnny Briggs 24 Mar 1892
12/286 v. India Australia Nathan Lyon 9 Dec 2014
11/181 v. West Indies Australia Geoff Lawson 7 Dec 1984
11/183 v. West Indies Australia Clarrie Grimmett 12 Dec 1930
11/215 v. Australia England Derek Underwood 25 Jan 1975
Lowest strike rate (4+ innings)[56]
Strike rate Player Period
36.0 (24 wickets) Australia Jeff Thompson 1975–1982
36.7 (10 wickets) Cricket West Indies Frank Worrell 1951–1961
37.9 (39 wickets) Australia Mitchell Starc 2015–2021
38.1 (16 wickets) Australia Damien Fleming 1995–1999
39.0 (22 wickets) Australia Geoff Lawson 1982–1984
Australia totalled 674 all out in 1948, as Don Bradman scored 201 and Lindsay Hassett 198*.
Australia totalled 674 all out in 1948, as Don Bradman scored 201 and Lindsay Hassett 198*.

Team records

Highest innings scores[57]
Score Team Date
674 Australia Australia v. India 23 Jan 1948
624 Pakistan Pakistan v. Australia 9 Dec 1983
5/620d England England v. Australia 3 Dec 2010
616 Cricket West Indies West Indies v. Australia 24 Jan 1969
7/604d Australia Australia v. India 24 Jan 2012
Lowest completed innings[58]
Score Team Date
36 India India v. Australia 17 Dec 2020
82 Australia Australia v. West Indies 22 Dec 1951
100 Australia Australia v. England 24 Mar 1892
105 Cricket West Indies West Indies v. Australia 22 Dec 1951
110 India India v. Australia 10 Dec 1999

Partnership records

Highest partnerships[59]
Runs Wicket Players Match Date
386 4th Ricky Ponting (221) & Michael Clarke (210) Australia Australia v. India India 24 Jan 2012
361 2nd David Warner (335*) & Marnus Labuschagne (162) Australia Australia v. Pakistan Pakistan 29 Nov 2019
341 3rd Eddie Barlow (201) & Graeme Pollock (175) South Africa South Africa v. Australia Australia 24 Jan 1964
310 4th Paul Collingwood (206) & Kevin Pietersen (158) England England v. Australia Australia 1 Dec 2006
303 5th Rahul Dravid (233) & VVS Laxman (148) India India v. Australia Australia 12 Dec 2003
Highest partnerships by wicket[60]
Runs Wicket Players Match Date
244 1st Bob Simpson (225) & Bill Lawry (119) Australia Australia v. England England 28 Jan 1966
361 2nd David Warner (335*) & Marnus Labuschagne (162) Australia Australia v. Pakistan Pakistan 29 Nov 2019
341 3rd Eddie Barlow (201) & Graeme Pollock (175) South Africa South Africa v. Australia Australia 24 Jan 1964
386 4th Ricky Ponting (221) & Michael Clarke (210) Australia Australia v. India India 24 Jan 2012
303 5th Rahul Dravid (233) & VVS Laxman (148) India India v. Australia Australia 12 Dec 2003
200 6th Michael Clarke (148) & Brad Haddin (118) Australia Australia v. England England 5 Dec 2013
168 7th Rod Marsh (132) & Kerry O'Keeffe (85) Australia Australia v. New Zealand New Zealand 26 Jan 1974
243 8th Clem Hill (160) & Roger Hartigan (116) Australia Australia v. England England 10 Jan 1908
122 9th David Holford (80) & Jackie Hendriks (37*) Cricket West Indies West Indies v. Australia Australia 24 Jan 1969
94 10th Sunil Gavaskar (166*) & Shivlal Yadav (41) India India v. Australia Australia 13 Dec 1985

All records correct as of 21 December 2021.

Australian rules football

A view of an Australian rules football match being played on Adelaide Oval from Montefiore Hill during the 1887 SAFA season. Note the lack of behind posts.
A view of an Australian rules football match being played on Adelaide Oval from Montefiore Hill during the 1887 SAFA season. Note the lack of behind posts.
Harold Oliver taking a spectacular mark during the 1914 SAFL Semi-final
In 1929 a women's Australian rules football match was witnessed by 41,000 spectators. A de Havilland Moth biplane dropped the game ball to start the match.[61]
In 1929 a women's Australian rules football match was witnessed by 41,000 spectators. A de Havilland Moth biplane dropped the game ball to start the match.[61]
Ian McKay taking a spectacular mark during the 1952 SANFL Grand Final
North Adelaide playing Hawthorn for the 1971 Championship of Australia
An aerial view of Adelaide Oval whilst an AFL match is in progress
An aerial view of Adelaide Oval whilst an AFL match is in progress

From 1877 until the 1973 SANFL Grand Final, Adelaide Oval was the marquee ground for South Australian National Football League matches. After a dispute between cricket and SANFL administrators, Australian rules football in South Australia was moved to Football Park in the western suburbs of Adelaide until its permanent return to the ground in 2014. Adelaide Oval hosted the 1889 SAFA Grand Final, the first grand final in any Australian rules football competition after Port Adelaide and Norwood finished the 1889 SAFA season with the same win–loss–draw record. The record crowd for an Australian rules football match at Adelaide Oval was set at the 1965 SANFL Grand Final between Sturt and Port Adelaide when 62,543 saw the latter win by three points. After 1973 Australian rules football matches were sporadically held at the ground apart from South Adelaide games as that club continued to use the ground for their home matches after 1973. After the advent of the Australian Football League in 1990 only one AFL match was held at the ground before it was permanently adopted again by the code, with Port Adelaide hosting Melbourne during the last minor round match of the 2011 AFL season.[62] As of 2014, all SANFL Finals Series matches are played at the ground including the SANFL Grand Final. Regular Australian Football League matches at the venue also began in 2014.

Australian rules football timeline

Australian rules football records

The first senior league Australian rules football match was played on Adelaide Oval in 1877 between the original Adelaide club and the Bankers club. The records below cover senior Australian rules football at Adelaide Oval. These records include the South Australian league football (known as the South Australian Football Association and South Australian Football League and the South Australian National Football League) from 1877 when the first premiership matches were held at the ground till the end of the 1990 SANFL season, the last year that the competition was the highest level of Australian rules football in South Australia. In 1991 the newly created Adelaide Crows entered the Australian Football League subsequently playing the highest level of football in the state. Port Adelaide would join the Australian Football League in 1997.

Individual (Men)

Most goals in a game by a player
Most career goals by a player
Most career games by a player

Team (men)

Most consecutive wins by a club at the ground
Highest team score
Largest single-quarter score
Largest winning margin
Lowest team score

Individual (women)

Most goals in a game
Australian Football League Women (2019–present)[73]
Goals Player Club Year
3 Danielle Ponter Adelaide 2019
3 Danielle Ponter Adelaide 2019
2 Erin Phillips Adelaide 2019
2 Erin Phillips Adelaide 2019
2 Ebony Marinoff Adelaide 2019
2 Chloe Scheer Adelaide 2019
2 Courtney Hodder Brisbane Lions 2021
2 Jess Wuetschner Brisbane Lions 2021
Last update from 2021, AFLW Preliminary Final.
Most goals in a career
Australian Football League Women (2019–present)[73]
Goals Player Club Year
8 Danielle Ponter Adelaide 2019–2022
5 Erin Phillips Adelaide 2019–2022
3 Chloe Scheer Adelaide 2019–2022
2 Ebony Marinoff Adelaide 2019–2022
2 Courtney Hodder Brisbane Lions 2021–2021
2 Jess Wuetschner Brisbane Lions 2021–2021
2 Stevie-Lee Thompson Adelaide 2019–2022
Last update 2022 AFLW Preliminary Final.

Team (women)

Highest team score
Australian Football League Women (2019–present)
Score Club Year
11.7 (73) vs Geelong Adelaide 2019
10.3 (63) vs Carlton Adelaide 2019
6.2 (38) vs Adelaide Brisbane Lions 2021
5.3 (33) vs Melbourne Adelaide 2021
3.2 (20) vs Brisbane Lions Adelaide 2021

Rugby League

In 1991, the NSWRL came to Adelaide Oval when the St. George Dragons played the Balmain Tigers on a cold and wet Friday night under temporary lights in the first of five games that the Dragons would play at the oval over the next five years. That game, with the Dragons winning 16–2, set a rugby league record crowd for the ground when 28,884 people attended, and was in fact the highest minor round attendance for the 1991 NSWRL season (beaten only by four of the six Finals series games including the Grand Final). In 1997 Adelaide got its own side in the much vaunted (but short lived) Super League competition with the Adelaide Rams. Their first home game attracted their record crowd when 27,435 saw the Rams defeat SL's other new team, the Hunter Mariners 10–8. However, after disputes over money (and dwindling crowds due to poor on-field results) they left the ground in 1998 and moved to Hindmarsh Stadium. In the 2010 and 2011 National Rugby League seasons, Sydney club the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs played home games at the Oval against the Melbourne Storm. The Bulldogs had intended to make Adelaide Oval their second "home" (the club plays its home games at Sydney's Olympic Stadium), but the plan was abandoned after 2010. On 20 November 2016, it was announced that the Sydney Roosters will take on the Melbourne Storm in the 2017 NRL season meaning that top level Rugby league returned to Adelaide for the first time since 2011. The Roosters won the game, played on 24 June in Round 16 of the season, 25–24 in golden point extra time in front of a crowd of 21,492 fans.[79]

It was announced in February 2018 that the Oval would host one State of Origin match in 2020.[80]

Rugby League timeline

Soccer

Adelaide United take on Spanish side Málaga CF in an exhibition match in July 2014
Adelaide United take on Spanish side Málaga CF in an exhibition match in July 2014

Adelaide United FC have played a number of A-League home games against Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory FC. Adelaide Oval was the site of an international friendly match between the Socceroos and New Zealand on 5 June 2011. On 25 July 2014, Adelaide United played its first game at the fully re-developed Adelaide Oval when it played host to Spanish La Liga side Málaga CF. In front of 23,254 fans and a television audience in Spain, Málaga defeated the Reds 5–1.

Soccer timeline

Cycling

The 1903 Walne Stakes cycling race at Adelaide Oval was won by American professional cyclist Major Taylor who is pictured crossing the line
The 1903 Walne Stakes cycling race at Adelaide Oval was won by American professional cyclist Major Taylor who is pictured crossing the line

From the first cycling race held at Adelaide Oval in 1882 until the last in 1910 when the administration of Adelaide Oval placed a fence on the inside of the track, Adelaide Oval regularly hosted cycling races that attracted tens of thousands of spectators.[87][88] During the 1903 Walne Stakes at Adelaide Oval famous professional American cyclist Major Taylor won the event.

Cycling timeline

Rugby union

Adelaide Oval hosting Australia and South Africa in a rugby union test match on 27 August, 2022.
Adelaide Oval hosting Australia and South Africa in a rugby union test match on 27 August, 2022.

Adelaide Oval hosted two games of the 2003 Rugby World Cup. On 25 October, The Wallabies played their first international game in Adelaide when they defeated Namibia 142–0 in front of 28,196 fans. The next day Ireland defeated Argentina 16–15 in front of 30,203 fans.

On 3 July 2004, The Wallabies hosted the Pacific Islanders at Adelaide Oval, winning 29–14 before a crowd of 19,266.

Adelaide Oval did not host another rugby union match until 27 August, 2022, when Australia defeated South Africa 25-17 in a Rugby Championship test match in front of a crowd of 36,336.

Rugby Sevens

From 2007 until 2010, Adelaide Oval hosted the Australia Sevens event in the IRB Sevens World Series.

Rugby Union timeline

Baseball

Albert Spalding's 1888 tour sides with the Chicago team left and All-American team right. The two sides played three matches at Adelaide Oval with Chicago winning 2–1.
Albert Spalding's 1888 tour sides with the Chicago team left and All-American team right. The two sides played three matches at Adelaide Oval with Chicago winning 2–1.

In 1888, American Baseball administrator Albert Spalding brought the Chicago team and an additional composite team called the All-Americans to Australia and would play a series of three exhibition matches at Adelaide Oval. Chicago would win the Adelaide series 2–1.[74] Following on from this exhibition of the match in Australia, over the next few years intercolonial matches were commonly played against other states on the ground.

Baseball timeline

American football

During World War II an American football match was held at Adelaide Oval where 25,000 locals attended as part of Independence Day celebrations in 1942
During World War II an American football match was held at Adelaide Oval where 25,000 locals attended as part of Independence Day celebrations in 1942

During World War II an American football match was held by American soldiers stationed in Adelaide on Independence Day. At least 25,000 spectators attended the match that was staged between teams referred to as the "Packers" and "Bears" with the latter winning the match.

American football timeline

Tennis

The Adelaide Oval grounds have maintained a long tradition of holding tennis tournaments.

Tennis timeline

Field hockey

In 1926 the Indian Army Hockey team defeated the South Australian team. Pictured is the Indian team being greeted by the South Australian Governor.
In 1926 the Indian Army Hockey team defeated the South Australian team. Pictured is the Indian team being greeted by the South Australian Governor.

Hockey was first played at Adelaide Oval in the early 1900s.

Field hockey timeline

Other sports

Aside from the main sports of cricket and Australian rules football, 14 sports have been played at one time or another at the oval: Highland games, lacrosse, quoits, and Motorcycle racing.

Other uses

As part of the 1927 Royal Tour, the Duke and Duchess of York had a motorcade through Adelaide Oval with many people present for the event.[105]

In 1885 an Indigenous corroboree was held at the ground attracting 20,000 spectators to one of the nights. Religious gatherings have previously been held at the ground. Adelaide Oval also provides an array of functions throughout the year.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Adelaide Christmas Pageant was held at Adelaide Oval to a permitted audience of 25,000 in 2020, and 16,000 in 2021. Tickets were drawn from a raffle, and the pageant was held in the evening. The 2022 pageant is expected to return to the streets, although Adelaide Oval has been reserved in the event of another variant.[106][107]

Concerts

Adelaide Oval has regularly been host to large outdoor concerts. Due to its high profile, proximity to the CBD and Adelaide Railway station and lack of competition for facilities of its scale in Adelaide it has often been the choice of international musicians looking to host large concerts.

List of concerts at Adelaide Oval

Date Artist Opening act(s) Tour / Concert name Attendance Revenue
28 January 1977 Little River Band
23 November 1977 Fleetwood Mac Rumours
11 November 1978 David Bowie The Angels Isolar II 45,650 / 50,000 $684,750
13 November 1978 Peter Frampton Cold Chisel
5 February 1979 Rod Stewart Cold Chisel Blondes 'Ave More Fun Tour
18 November 1980 KISS Eyes Unmasked Tour
9 February 1983 Simon & Garfunkel Summer Evening
9 November 1983 David Bowie Serious Moonlight
1 March 1993 Paul McCartney The New World Tour
1 December 1993 Madonna Peter Andre The Girlie Show World Tour 40,000
26 November 1996 Michael Jackson HIStory World Tour 50,000
18 March 1998 Elton John
Billy Joel
Face to Face 37,500
6 December 2002 Pink Party Tour
2 March 2004 Fleetwood Mac Say You Will Tour
17 November 2009 Pearl Jam Liam Finn & EJ Barnes
Ben Harper
Backspacer
2 March 2010 AC/DC Wolfmother
Calling All Cars
Black Ice World Tour 41,569 $5,396,590
5 December 2011 Foo Fighters Tenacious D
Fucked Up
Calling All Cars[108]
Wasting Light 36,000
25 October 2014 The Rolling Stones Jimmy Barnes 14 On Fire 54,115[109] $8,906,058
21 November 2015 AC/DC The Hives
Kingswood
Rock or Bust World Tour 50,000
18 February 2017 Guns N' Roses Wolfmother Not in This Lifetime... 33,713 $3,541,050
13 March 2017 Adele Adele Live 2016 70,000
26 October 2017 Midnight Oil Bad Dreems
Spiderbait
The Great Circle 11,000
7 March 2018 Ed Sheeran Missy Higgins ÷ Tour 62,915 $5,103,599
25 January 2019 Phil Collins Not Dead Yet Tour 30,000 $2,675,500
19 November 2019 U2 Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 30,708 $2,497,877
26 February 2020 Queen + Adam Lambert The Rhapsody Tour 42,484 $4,436,072
29 November 2022 Guns N' Roses Guns N' Roses 2020 Tour

Attendance records

Attendance records (outright)

No. Crowd Date Participants Event Series
1 70,000 2017 March 13 Adele Concert Adele Live 2017 [110]
2 67,000 2018 March 7 Ed Sheeran Concert ÷ Tour
3 62,543 1965 October 2 Port Adelaide def. Sturt Australian rules football 1965 SANFL Grand Final [111]
4 60,000 1927 May 3 Duke and Duchess of York Motorcade 1927 Royal Tour [112]
5 59,417 1966 October 1 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1966 SANFL Grand Final
6 58,924 1957 September 28 Port Adelaide def. Norwood Australian rules football 1957 SANFL Grand Final
7 58,849 1967 September 30 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1967 SANFL Grand Final
8 57,811 1968 September 28 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1968 SANFL Grand Final
9 56,525 1973 September 29 Glenelg def. North Adelaide Australian rules football 1973 SANFL Grand Final
10 55,709 1972 September 30 North Adelaide def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1972 SANFL Grand Final

Attendance records (by event type)

Attendance records by event type
No. Crowd Date Participants Event Series
1 70,000 2017 March 13 Adele Concert Adele Live 2017
2 62,543 1965 October 2 Port Adelaide def. Sturt Australian rules football 1965 SANFL Grand Final [111]
3 60,000 1927 May 3 Duke and Duchess of York Motorcade 1927 Royal Tour [112]
4 55,317 2017 December 2 Australia def. England Cricket 2017–18 Ashes series
5 53,008 2015 July 20 Adelaide United def. by Liverpool F.C. Soccer 2015 Liverpool Tour
6 34,000 2000 May 24 Archbishop Leonard Faulkner Religious Gathering Catholic Schools Jubilee [113]
7 30,203 2003 October 26 Ireland def. Argentina Rugby union 2003 Rugby World Cup
8 28,884 1991 June 28 St. George Dragons def. Balmain Tigers Rugby league 1991 NSWRL season
9 25,000 1941 July 4 "Bears" def. "Packers" American football United States Army
10 20,000 1885 May 30 Indigenous dancers Indigenous corroboree Two night corrobee

Attendance record (sport)

Top 10 all time sports attendances
No. Crowd Date Teams Sport Competition
1 62,543 1965 October 2 Port Adelaide def. Sturt Australian rules football 1965 SANFL Grand Final [111]
2 59,417 1966 October 1 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1966 SANFL Grand Final
3 58,924 1957 September 28 Port Adelaide def. Norwood Australian rules football 1957 SANFL Grand Final
4 58,849 1967 September 30 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1967 SANFL Grand Final
5 57,811 1968 September 28 Sturt def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1968 SANFL Grand Final
6 56,525 1973 September 29 Glenelg def. North Adelaide Australian rules football 1973 SANFL Grand Final
7 56,353 1964 October 30 South Adelaide def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1964 SANFL Grand Final
8 55,709 1972 September 30 North Adelaide def. Port Adelaide Australian rules football 1972 SANFL Grand Final
9 55,600 1969 October 4 Sturt def. Glenelg Australian rules football 1969 SANFL Grand Final
10 55,317 2017 December 2 Australia vs England Cricket 2017–18 Ashes series

Attendance record (sport excluding Cricket and Australian rules)

Top 10 non-Australian rules football or cricket sports attendance records
No. Crowd Date Teams Sport Competition
1 53,008 2015 July 20 Adelaide United def. by Liverpool F.C. Soccer 2015 Liverpool Tour
2 50,119 2016 May 1 Adelaide United def. Western Sydney Wanderers Soccer 2016 A-League Grand Final
3 35,439 2016 March 24 Australia def. Tajikistan Soccer 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification
4 33,126 2014 October 17 Adelaide United drew with Melbourne Victory Soccer 2014–15 A-League
5 30,203 2003 October 26 Ireland def. Argentina Rugby union 2003 Rugby World Cup
6 29,785 2017 June 8 Australia def. Saudi Arabia Soccer 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification
7 28,884 1991 June 28 St George Dragons def. Balmain Tigers Rugby league 1991 NSWRL season
8 28,196 2003 October 25 Australia def. Namibia Rugby union 2003 Rugby World Cup
8 27,425 1997 March 14 Adelaide Rams def. Hunter Mariners Rugby league 1997 Super League season
9 25,039 2007 December 28 Adelaide United def. by Sydney FC Soccer 2007–08 A-League

Attendance records (concerts)

Top 10 musical acts/events attendance records
No. Crowd Date Artist(s) Name of tour/event
1 70,000 13 March 2017 Adele Adele Live 2017
2 62,915 7 March 2018 Ed Sheeran ÷ Tour
3 54,115 25 October 2014 The Rolling Stones 14 On Fire [109]
4 50,000 26 November 1996 Michael Jackson HIStory World Tour
50,000 21 November 2015 AC/DC Rock or Bust World Tour [114]
6 45,650 11 November 1978 David Bowie Isolar II
7 42,484 26 February 2020 Queen + Adam Lambert The Rhapsody Tour
8 41,569 2 March 2010 AC/DC Black Ice World Tour
9 40,000 1 December 1993 Madonna The Girlie Show World Tour
10 37,500 18 March 1998 Elton John/Billy Joel Face to Face

Statues

Adelaide Oval statues
Subject Unveiling Notability Sculptor Donator Location
Hercules Statue Adelaide.jpeg
Hercules
1892 Roman god WA Horn Pennington Gardens
Ross Smith.jpg
Ross Smith
1892 Aviator Frederick Brook Hitch Creswell Gardens
Don Bradman statue.JPG
Donald Bradman
2002 Cricketer Robert Hannaford East Gate
Jason Gillespie statue, Adelaide Oval, 22 August 2020.jpg
Jason Gillespie
2010 Cricketer Ken Martin Basil Sellers SACA members reserve
Darren Lehmann statue, Adelaide Oval, 22 August 2020.jpg
Darren Lehmann
2012 Cricketer Ken Martin Basil Sellers SACA members reserve
Barrie Robran Statue.jpg
Barrie Robran
2014 Australian rules footballer Basil Sellers South Gate
George Giffen statue Adelaide Oval, 2017.jpg
George Giffen
2014 Cricketer Judith Rolevink Basil Sellers
Russell Ebert statue.jpg
Russell Ebert
2015 Australian rules footballer Basil Sellers East Gate
Malcolm Blight statue Adelaide Oval.jpg
Malcolm Blight
2016 Australian rules footballer Basil Sellers South East concourse
Ken Farmer statue Adelaide Oval.jpg
Ken Farmer
2017 Australian rules footballer Basil Sellers North West gate
Clem Hill statue Adelaide Oval.jpg
Clem Hill
2018 Cricketer Silvio Appunyi Basil Sellers South Gate

Transport access (CGP)

Public transport access
Service Station/stop Line/route Walking distance Note
from Adelaide Oval
Adelaide Metro Buses
Aiga bus trans.svg
King William Rd West
Montefiore Rd West
26 routes
7 routes
300 m (4 mins)
550m (7 mins)
Adelaide Metro Trains
BSicon BAHN.svg
Adelaide 6 lines 550 m (7 mins) Between December 2016 and April 2021, the northern doors of Adelaide Railway station were closed due to redevelopment of the Festival Centre.
Adelaide Metro Trams
BSicon TRAM.svg
Adelaide Glenelg 650 m (8 mins)
Airport Shuttle Bus
Aiga bus trans.svg
Adelaide Bradman Dr 550 m (13+7 mins)

See also

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