Locations of World Heritage Sites in Hawaii
Locations of World Heritage Sites in Alaska
Locations of World Heritage Sites in Puerto Rico

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of importance to cultural or natural heritage as described in the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, established in 1972.[1] Cultural heritage consists of monuments (such as architectural works, monumental sculptures, or inscriptions), groups of buildings, and sites (including archaeological sites). Natural features (consisting of physical and biological formations), geological and physiographical formations (including habitats of threatened species of animals and plants), and natural sites which are important from the point of view of science, conservation, or natural beauty, are defined as natural heritage.[2] The United States accepted the convention on December 7, 1973.[3] As of 2022, there are 24 World Heritage Sites in the United States, with a further 19 on the tentative list.[3]

The first sites in the United States added to the list were Mesa Verde National Park and Yellowstone National Park, both at the Second Session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Washington, D.C., in 1978.[4] The most recent site listed was a selection of eight structures exemplifying the 20th-century architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, in 2019.[3] The twenty-four sites are located in twenty different states and two territories. Arizona, California, Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, New Mexico, New York, and Pennsylvania, each contain multiple sites (with the Frank Lloyd Wright site spread across six states), while two sites (the Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park (Montana) and Kluane / Wrangell – St. Elias / Glacier Bay / Tatshenshini-Alsek (Alaska)) are transboundary sites shared with Canada.[3] Of the 24 sites, 11 are cultural, 12 are natural, and one, Papahānaumokuākea, is mixed, listed for both cultural and natural properties.[3] One site is currently listed as endangered: the Everglades National Park was listed in 2010 due to deterioration of its aquatic ecosystems. The site had also been listed between 1993 and 2007. Yellowstone National Park was listed as endangered between 1995 and 2003 because of planned mining operations.[5] The United States has served as a member of the World Heritage Committee five times, 1976–1983, 1987–1993, 1993–1999, 1999–2001, and 2005–2009.[3]

World Heritage Sites

UNESCO lists sites under ten criteria; each entry must meet at least one of the criteria. Criteria i through vi are cultural, and vii through x are natural.[6]

  * Transnational site
  In danger In danger
World Heritage Sites
Site Image Location (state) Year listed UNESCO data Description
Mesa Verde National Park
Ruins of stone buildings under a cliff
Colorado 1978 27; iii (cultural) The Mesa Verde plateau was occupied by the ancient Pueblo peoples between the 6th and 12th centuries. More than 4000 archaeological sites have been discovered, including cliff dwellings. They range in size from small rooms to complexes containing more than 100 rooms. Notable examples include Cliff Palace (pictured), Balcony House, and Square Tower House.[7]
Yellowstone National Park
Grand Prismatic Spring, a hot spring in vivid colors
Wyoming, Montana, Idaho 1978 28; vii, viii, ix, x (natural) Designated in 1872 as the world's first national park, Yellowstone covers almost 3,500 square miles (9,000 km2). It contains numerous geothermal features including over 300 geysers (more than a half in the world), hot springs (Grand Prismatic Spring pictured), mudpots, and fumaroles. The area is rich in fossil deposits with nearly 150 species of plants identified. The park is home to large herds of bison, as well as grizzly bear and gray wolf, and also functions as a model to understand the ecosystem processes. The site listed as endangered between 1995 and 2003 because of planned mining operations.[8]
Kluane / Wrangell–St. Elias / Glacier Bay / Tatshenshini-Alsek*
A glacier entering the sea in a mountain valley
Alaska 1979 72ter; vii, viii, ix, x (natural) The four national parks and protected areas spanning the border between the United States and Canada contain the world's largest non-polar ice field and numerous large glaciers. The area, shaped by glacial and continuous tectonic activity, comprises different types of habitats, from high mountains above 16,000 ft (5,000 m) to ocean, coastal forests, and river valleys. Some of the important animal species include grizzly bear, caribou, Dall sheep, mountain goat. The rivers are spawning grounds for salmon that then migrate to the ocean. Johns Hopkins Glacier in Glacier Bay (pictured) was originally listed alone in 1979. Kluane (in Canada) and Wrangell–St. Elias were added to the site in 1992, and Tatshenshini-Alsek (in Canada) in 1994.[9][10][11]
Grand Canyon National Park
Grand Canyon at dawn
Arizona 1979 75; vii, viii, ix, x (natural) The Grand Canyon is a spectacular gorge that the Colorado River has carved during the last six million years while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. The canyon is 277 mi (446 km) long, up to 18 mi (29 km) wide, and reaches the depths of up to 0.93 mi (1.5 km). The river has cut through geological strata spanning 2 billion years, from Precambrian to the Cenozoic, with the Precambrian and Paleozoic portions particularly well exposed and containing rich fossil assemblages. Due to its diverse topography, the area is home to numerous animal and plant species, from desert riparian to boreal forest communities.[12]
Everglades National ParkIn danger
Pine trees in a grassy area
Florida 1979 76; viii, ix, x (natural) The Everglades comprises vast flat wetlands together with coastal and marine ecosystems. Habitats include tropical hardwood hammocks, mangrove forests, pine rocklands (example pictured), fresh and saltwater marshes, and seagrass beds. The area is home to several mammal, bird, and reptile species, such as the manatee, Florida panther, snail kite, alligator, and crocodile. The site was was placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger from 1993 to 2007 due to sustained hurricane damage and deterioration of water flow and quality due to agricultural and urban development, and again in 2010 due to degradation of the property resulting in a loss of marine habitat and decline in marine species. It is also a Ramsar Wetland.[13][14]
Independence Hall
A building in red brick with a clock tower
Pennsylvania 1979 78; vi (cultural) The building was designed by Andrew Hamilton and completed in 1753 to house the colonial assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania. It was renovated several times afterwards. The original wooden steeple used to house the Liberty Bell. The Hall was the site of the Second Continental Congress, during which the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776. Following the American Revolution, the building held the Constitutional Convention that debated and signed the United States Constitution in 1787. Both documents have served as inspirations for lawmakers and government charters throughout the world.[15]
Redwood National and State Parks
Redwood forest in a fog
California 1980 134; vii, ix (natural) The site comprises one national and three state parks located along the coast of northern California. They are home to the largest contiguous forests of coast redwood trees, which are the tallest tree species on Earth. The park also contains areas of pristine coastline which is home to sea lions, bald eagle, and California brown pelican.[16]
Mammoth Cave National Park
Visitors with a guide inside a cave
Kentucky 1981 150; vii, viii, x (natural) Mammoth Cave is the longest known cave system in the world, with over 285 mi (459 km) of explored passageways. The cave system is home to more than 130 cave-dwelling species. The cave system and the surrounding area exhibit numerous examples of karst topography, with sinkholes, underground rivers, speleothem, and large chambers. The system also has a great variety of sulfate minerals.[17]
Olympic National Park
Coast and temperate forest
Washington 1981 151; vii, ix (natural) The park comprises diverse habitats, including the largest protected area of temperate rainforest in the region, long stretches of undeveloped Pacific coastline, alpine meadows, as well as mountain peaks covered with glaciers. The rivers are important habitats for several anadromous fish species. Due to relative isolation, the area is home to several endemic species or subspecies, indicating that the evolution is taking its separate course. Some of the important species include the northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, and bull trout.[18]
Cahokia
A large earthen mound with steps leading to the top
Illinois 1982 198; iii, iv (cultural) Cahokia was the largest and most important urban settlement of the Mississippian culture and is the largest pre-Columbian archaeological site north of Mexico. The society reached its peak between 1050 and 1150, when it was estimated to have a population of 10,000 to 20,000 people. The site includes some 120 mounds, including the Monks Mound (pictured), the largest prehistoric earthen structure in the Americas. The site also includes the Woodhenge, believed to serve as an astronomical observatory. The layout of the settlement demonstrates the existence of political and economic hierarchy of the society.[19]
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Hills covered with forest, misty
North Carolina, Tennessee 1983 259; vii, viii, ix, x (natural) The park is one of the world's largest remaining remnants of the diverse Arcto-Tertiary Geoflora era, it is a refuge of the flora and fauna that survived the Quaternary glaciations. It is a biodiversity hotspot, containing over 3,500 plant species and numerous animal species, including one of the world's greatest variety of salamanders, in particular lungless salamanders. The area is large enough that it allows the continuous biological evolution of the natural system.[20]
La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historic Site in Puerto Rico
A blue fortress and stone walls above a bay
Puerto Rico1 1983 266bis; vi (cultural) The 16th-century fortress La Fortaleza (pictured) and the later fortifications of Castillo San Felipe del Morro, Castillo de San Cristóbal, El Cañuelo, and the City Wall of San Juan, dating between the 16th and 20th centuries, were constructed by the Europeans to protect the bay and the city of San Juan. They incorporate architectural elements of Italian Renaissance, Baroque, and French Enlightenment, and they demonstrate the evolution and adaptation of European military architecture to the setting of a Caribbean island. A minor boundary modification took place in 2016.[21]
Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty on the Liberty Island, photo from above
New York 1984 307; i, vi (cultural) The statue, inaugurated in 1886, was a gift from France to commemorate the centenary of American independence. It was designed by Frédéric Bartholdi in collaboration with engineer Gustave Eiffel, and its construction, with a metal frame supporting the skin, use of concrete at the base, and electricity to power the torch, was seen as a harbinger of a new era. The state is located at the entrance to the New York Harbor where it was welcoming millions of migrants. It symbolizes ideas such as liberty, peace, and human rights. [22]
Yosemite National Park
A glacial valley with steep granite walls and forest in the bottom
California 1984 308; vii, viii (natural) The park is located in the Sierra Nevada mountains. During the Quaternary glaciation, the glaciers have created unique landscape features in the granite bedrock, such as valleys, cliffs, domes, and waterfalls. The altitudes range from 2,000 ft (600 m) to 13,000 ft (4,000 m), resulting in a wide variety of habitats that include diverse flora and fauna. There are mountain meadows and Giant Sequoia groves. Picture shows the Tunnel View of the Yosemite Valley, with the landforms Half Dome and El Capitan visible.[23]
Chaco Culture
Ruins of a circular structure
New Mexico 1987 353rev; iii (cultural) Chaco Canyon was a major centre of the Ancestral Puebloans and was occupied between 850 and 1250, with the peak between about 1020 and 1110. Living in a harsh environment, the highly-organized society constructed monumental structures, "great houses", that had residential, storage, and ceremonial functions. Based on the size, it was likely a regional centre of the Four Corners area. The great kiva at Chetro Ketl is pictured. The World Heritage Site also includes the ruins at the Aztec Ruins National Monument and some smaller sites.[24]
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Lava flow
Hawaii 1987 409; viii (natural) The park in the island of Hawaii is home to Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, two of the most active and among the best studied volcanoes in the world. Mauna Loa reaches 13,680 ft (4,170 m) above the sea level, but measured from the ocean floor, it is the world's greatest volcanic mass. The landscape of the park is being constantly shaped and changed by the frequent volcanic eruptions. The park is home to rare bird species and a forest of giant ferns. A lava flow is pictured.[25]
Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville
A neoclassical building in red brick and white stone
Virginia 1987 442bis; i, iv, vi (cultural) Monticello (built between 1769 and 1809, pictured) was designed by Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence, as his plantation home. Jefferson also designed (1817–26) the early buildings that made up the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, based on his idea of an ideal "academic village". The Rotunda is modeled after the Pantheon in Rome. The buildings are prominent examples of neoclassical architecture and invoke classical ideals such as freedom, nobility, self-determination, and prosperity.[26]
Taos Pueblo
A multi-storey adobe structure
New Mexico 1992 492; iv (cultural) Taos Pueblo is the largest of the Pueblos established along the Rio Grande and its tributaries in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. It has been continuously inhabited since and is an important example of a culture retaining most of its Pre-Columbian traditions. The settlement consists of two multi-storey adobe buildings, ceremonial kivas, a Catholic church, and ruins of previous buildings.[27]
Carlsbad Caverns National Park
A cave with several dripstone formations
New Mexico 1995 721; vii, viii (natural) The park contains over 100 karst caves, including Carlsbad Caverns (interior pictured) and Lechuguilla Cave. The latter exhibits rare and unique speleothems, including those made of gypsum. Formations also include helictites, calcite structures, and biothems, the formation of which is assisted by bacteria. The caves formed in the Capitan Reef complex from the Permian period, thus allowing researchers to study the ancient reef both from inside and from the exposed parts in the canyon outside.[28]
Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park*
A mountain lake
Montana 1995 354rev; vii, ix (natural) This site comprises the Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and the Glacier National Park in the US. Both parks are known for their outstanding scenic beauty due to mountains and glacial landforms. The park straddles the Continental Divide and includes the Triple Divide Peak. The mountains are meeting the prairie without intervening foothills and the geography allowed the animal and plant species typical of Pacific Northwest to spread inland. This resulted in a high number of animal and plant species present on a small area. Saint Mary Lake is pictured.[29]
Papahānaumokuākea
A red sea urchin under the sea
Hawaii and United States Minor Outlying Islands2 2010 1326; iii, vi, viii, ix, x (mixed) Papahānaumokuākea, world's largest marine protected area, is located west of the main Hawaiian Islands. It stretches over some 1,200 mi (1,930 km) and covers a number of small islands, atolls, and seamounts, together with the surrounding ocean. They illustrate the progression of the Hawaii hotspot. The terrestrial and marine habitats are home to numerous bird, fish, seal, coral, and plant species, with many of them endemic. The islands are regarded with traditional significance for living Native Hawaiian culture, with archaeological sites in the islands of Nihoa and Makumanamana dating before the European contact. Heterocentrotus mamillatus, a sea urchin, is pictured.[30]
Monumental Earthworks of Poverty Point
Two grass-covered mounds
Louisiana 2014 1435; iii (cultural) The vast earthen complex at Poverty Point of this site was constructed between 1700 and 1100 BCE, during the Late Archaic Period. It was created by a foraging society of fishermen-hunter-gatherers, instead of a settled agricultural society. The complex consists of semi-elliptical ridges with a central plaza, and several mounds. It was used for residential and ceremonial purposes. It was also a centre of a vast trade network, extending hundreds of kilometers to supply stone and minerals. This level of earthen construction was not surpassed in North America for another 2000 years.[31]
San Antonio Missions
A stone church building with three bells
Texas 2015 1466; ii (cultural) The site comprises five frontier mission complexes, constructed in the 18th century by Spanish Franciscan missionaries, as well as a nearby ranch. The missions were built along the San Antonio River in order to spread religion, to colonize the area, and to defend the frontier. They demonstrate the cultural interactions between the Spanish and the Coahuiltecan and other hunter-gatherer groups, who became settled agriculturalists within the time of one generation. The decorative elements in the churches represent a blend of Catholic and indigenous motifs. Mission Espada is pictured.[32]
The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright
A house with a waterfall going through, surrounded by a forest
Arizona, California, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin 2019 1496rev; ii (cultural) This site comprises eight buildings designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in the first half of the 20th century. Wright developed the concept of "organic architecture" which is characterized by blurring of the boundaries between exterior and interior of the buildings, as well as novel uses of materials such as steel and concrete. The buildings listed include residential buildings (Fallingwater pictured), a church, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Wright's work influenced architects worldwide.[33]

Tentative list

In addition to sites inscribed on the World Heritage List, member states can maintain a list of tentative sites that they may consider for nomination. Nominations for the World Heritage List are only accepted if the site was previously listed on the tentative list.[34] As of 2022, the United States lists 19 properties on its tentative list.[3]

Tentative sites
Site Image Location (state) Year listed UNESCO criteria Description
Civil Rights Movement Sites
A church in brick at the street corner
Alabama 2008 vi (cultural) The site comprises three African-American churches that played role in the civil rights movement, a political movement to abolish institutional racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement throughout the United States. The sites illustrate the struggle for non-violent social change. The listed churches are the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery and two churches in Birmingham: Bethel Baptist Church and the 16th Street Baptist Church (pictured). The latter was partially rebuilt after the 1963 bombing.[35]
Dayton Aviation Sites
A historic photograph depicting one of the early flights of Wright brothers
Ohio 2008 ii (cultural) In 1904 and 1905, the Wright brothers tested a series of early airplanes, including the Wright Flyer III, the world's first practical airplane. The nomination comprises the following sites in Dayton and surroundings, related to early aviation: Huffman Prairie, the flying field (pictured with one of the early flights), the Wright Cycle Company where the brothers were conducting early experiments, the Wright Hall that houses the first airplane, and the Hawthorn Hill, the residence of Orville Wright.[36]
Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks
Several earthen mounds and some trees
Ohio 2008 iii, vi (cultural) This nomination comprises a series of sites of the Hopewell culture from the Woodland period of the first millennium CE. They constructed large-scale ceremonial earthworks, such as mounds and walls in geometric designs. Fort Ancient is an example of a hilltop fort. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park comprises five sites (Mound City with more than 30 mounds pictured) with walls in shapes of squares and circles. The Newark Earthworks contain some large enclosures. Excavations at the sites uncovered several finely crafted objects from materials that were obtained by trade with areas as far as the Yellowstone basin.[37]
Thomas Jefferson Buildings
A neoclassical building in white, inspired by a Roman temple
Virginia 2008 iii, vi (cultural) This is a proposed extension to the Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville site, with two buildings designed by Thomas Jefferson. The Poplar Forest, a plantation house, was inspired by the architecture of Andrea Palladio. The Virginia State Capitol (pictured) was inspired by the Maison carrée in Nîmes, France. As an architect, Jefferson was mostly interested in buildings with domestic, educational, and governmental functions.[38]
Mount Vernon
A large plantation house surrounded by trees
Virginia 2008 iv (cultural) Mount Vernon is a former plantation and home of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The property comprises 16 structures, including the mansion (pictured), houses for servants, stables, and storage facilities. The complex represents a well-preserved cultural landscape of the 18th-century American South, inspired by English models.[39]
Serpent Mound
A large earthworks in shape of a snake
Ohio 2008 i, iii, iv (cultural) The Serpent Mound is a large effigy mound in shape of a snake that was built around 1120 CE by the Fort Ancient culture. The structure is 1,348 ft (411 m) long and up to 4 ft 11 in (1.5 m) tall. It is the world's largest preserved prehistoric mound of that type, and is representative of the mounds built by different cultures of the Eastern United States. The complex also includes three burial sites and some remains of habitation sites.[40]
Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge
Wetland scenery with some trees
Georgia 2008 viii, ix, x (natural) The wildlife refuge covers most of the Okefenokee Swamp, a large wetland that is also home to undisturbed peat deposits. The area is rich in plant and animal species, including up to 1000 species of moths. As opposed to wetlands that occur in river deltas, Okefenokee is instead the source of two rivers, which means it avoids most disturbances related to water flow.[41]
Petrified Forest National Park
A fossilized tree trunk, fractured into segments
Arizona 2008 vii, viii (natural) The park, located in the southern Colorado Plateau, is rich in fossil remains from the Late Triassic. There are assemblages of petrified trees, appearing at different stratigraphic levels, which allows the paleontologists study the ecosystem changes of that time. There are also remains of animals, including early dinosaurs.[42]
White Sands National Monument
White dunes
New Mexico 2008 vii, viii (natural) White Sands is a large gypsum desert. It is the world's largest and best protected surface gypsum deposit, as those deposits have been typically heavily mined in other places. The area supports several endemic animal and plant species that have adapted to living in a harsh environment.[43]
Brooklyn Bridge
A large suspension bridge in brick
New York 2017 ii, iv (cultural) The Brooklyn Bridge is a cable-stayed suspension bridge that connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. It was completed in 1883 and represents a milestone in construction of large bridges, with the use of novel materials and technologies, including steel cables and pneumatic caissons. The bridge is one of symbols of the city and a monument to the development and construction in the second half of the 19th century.[44]
Ellis Island
Aerial view of a small island with many buildings
New York 2017 iv (cultural) Ellis Island is a small island in New York Harbor that served as the main entry point for millions of voluntary immigrants, mostly from Europe, entering the United States in the second half of 19th and early 20th century. The Main Building now houses the museum of immigration. Other buildings in the complex include the kitchen and laundry building, the bakery and carpentry shop, the baggage and dormitory building, the main hospital, and the contagious disease complex.[45]
Central Park
Central Park view with a pond and skyscrapers in the background
New York 2017 i, ii, iv (cultural) Central Park is a large urban park in the middle of Manhattan. It was designed by landscape architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux and constructed between 1858 and 1873. The park illustrates the beginning of the movement at the turn of the 20th century to provide access to parks to people living in rapidly expanding and industrializing cities. The design of the park made use of the underlying topography, with wetlands and large rock outcrops, transforming it into a composition of meadows, lakes, and woods. There are also several decorative elements, such as arches, bridges, pavilions, and a castle. The Pond is pictured.[46]
Early Chicago Skyscrapers
A multi-story building from the late 19th century
Illinois 2017 i, iv (cultural) This nomination comprises nine buildings in the Loop district of Chicago. They were constructed in the last 20 years of the 19th century and represent the first generation of "skyscrapers", high-rise buildings reaching up to 20 stories. Construction of these buildings employed novel approaches and technologies, such as the use of steel frames, first elevators, electric lights, and terracotta fireproofing. The architects developed a new aesthetics for the exterior of this new type of buildings. The skyscrapers listed are the Auditorium Building (pictured), Second Leiter Building, Marquette Building, Rookery Building, Monadnock Building, Old Colony Building, Fisher Building, Schlesinger & Mayer Building, and Ludington Building.[47]
Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument
A sea turtle swimming over corals
United States Minor Outlying Islands 2017 vii, viii, x (natural) This nomination comprises seven islands or atolls south of the Hawaiian Islands, together with the surrounding ocean. They are home to pristine coral reefs and provide home to seabirds, fish, whales, crustaceans, and other animal groups. Numerous seamounts provide habitat for deepwater corals. A green sea turtle at Palmyra Atoll is pictured.[48]
California Current Conservation Complex
Small islands in a wavy ocean
California 2017 vii, viii, ix, x (natural) California Current flows along the coast of California. Strong upwelling brings nutrient-rich waters to the surface, supporting an extremely productive marine ecosystem. The nomination comprises six protected areas with a plethora of habitats, including kelp forests, seamounts, offshore canyons, rocky shores, islands, and islets. Animals present include several species of whales and sea turtles, California sea otter, and great white shark. The Farallon Islands are pictured.[49]
Marianas Trench Marine National Monument
Map showing the Mariana Trench area
Northern Mariana Islands 2017 viii, ix, x (natural) This nomination comprises parts of the Mariana Trench with Sirena Deep, the world's second deepest point at about 35,000 ft (11,000 m), 21 submarine volcanic sites and surrounding waters, and three of the northernmost Mariana Islands. This is the area where the Pacific Plate, is subducted (i.e., thrust) beneath the smaller Mariana Plate, creating different geological formations, including a mud volcano, volcanoes that emit liquid CO2, and hydrothermal vents. The islands and atolls are home to coral reefs with rich ecosystems while the Trench is home to many unusual and still undiscovered species. In some areas, communities that are based on photosynthesis and chemosynthesis coexist.[50]
Marine Protected Areas of American Samoa
A small atoll from far
American Samoa 2017 vii, ix, x (natural) This nomination comprises the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa and the Rose Atoll Marine National Monument with the Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. The area contains pristine tropical coral reefs which support high biodiversity. Some of the corals have demonstrated resilience to coral bleaching. There are seamounts and a hydrothermal vent which support communities of deep-sea organisms. Rose Atoll (pictured) is an important refuge for giant clams.[51]
Big Bend National Park
A view at a canyon from below
Texas 2017 viii, ix (natural) The park comprises parts of the Chihuahuan Desert, mountains, and the area around the Rio Grande river (a view at the Santa Elena Canyon pictured). It is home to desert flora and fauna, with cooler and wetter mountains acting like "sky islands" which are covered by relic forest of trees such as Arizona pine, Douglas fir, and Arizona cypress. The area is also rich in fossils from the past 130 million years. The Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary is visible in the strata, and furthermore, evidence of the tsunami caused by the Chicxulub impactor. The most famous fossil found in the park is the Quetzalcoatlus, the largest discovered pterosaur.[52]
Moravian Church Settlements (United States of America)*
A three-story historic building in stone
Pennsylvania 2022 iii, iv (cultural) The settlements of the Moravian Church, a Protestant denomination, from the second half of 18th century, are planned cities, reflecting the egalitarian philosophy of the community. They share similar urban layouts, including open and green spaces, a congregational building, cemetery, sanctuary, and houses for communal living, separated by age, gender, and marital status. Christiansfeld in Denmark has been listed as a World Heritage Site in 2015. The proposed extension includes the Historic Moravian Bethlehem District (the tannery building pictured) in the United States, Herrnhut in Germany, and Gracehill in the United Kingdom.[53][54]

See also

Notes

1. ^ Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory within the United States.
2. ^ Midway Atoll is a part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation of uninhabited insular areas of the United States and is administered as a National Wildlife Refuge.

References

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