Sampaloc
District of Manila
View of Sampaloc towards Quezon City, with España Boulevard
View of Sampaloc towards Quezon City, with España Boulevard
Nickname(s): 
Location of Sampaloc
CountryPhilippines
RegionNational Capital Region
CityManila
Congressional District4th District of Manila
Barangays192
Area
 • Total7.90 km2 (305 sq mi)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total388,305
 • Density49,000/km2 (1,300/sq mi)
ZIP Code
1008 (Sampaloc West)
1015 (Sampaloc East)

Sampaloc is a district of Manila, Philippines. It is referred to as the University Belt or simply called “U-Belt” for numerous colleges and universities are found within the district such as the University of Santo Tomas, the oldest extant university in Asia; the National University, the first private nonsectarian and coeducational institution in the Philippines; the Far Eastern University, known for its Art Deco campus and cultural heritage site of the Philippines; and the University of the East, once dubbed as the largest university in Asia in terms of enrollment. The district is bordered by the districts of Quiapo and San Miguel in the south, Santa Mesa district in the south and east, Santa Cruz district in the west and north, and Quezon City in the northeast.

Aside from being the "University Belt", Sampaloc is also known to Metro Manila and the surrounding provinces for its Dangwa flower market, located in Dimasalang Road, well known as the selling center for cut flowers from all over the Philippines, mainly Baguio. Sampaloc is also the location of a former colonial mansion, now called Windsor Inn, which is popular among backpackers and budget travelers.

Barangays 395 to 586 of the City of Manila would all have belonged to Sampaloc and comprise 241 barangays for the district.[1] However, what are now known as barangays 587-636 became part of Santa Mesa when these areas were separated from Sampaloc after Santa Mesa became a separate parish in 1911. Santa Mesa is now a part of the 6th congressional district of Manila, while Sampaloc is the sole district comprising the 4th congressional district of Manila.

Many streets in Sampaloc, particularly in the northeast portion divided by España and Lacson Avenues, have names that are directly associated with the Philippine national hero José Rizal, either named after the places (e.g. Calamba, Dapitan), real-life people (e.g. Blumentritt), characters from his novels (e.g. Ibarra, Maria Clara) or his pen names (e.g. Laong Laan, Dimasalang).

Barangays

Zone Barangay
Zone 41 Barangays 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402, 403, and 404
Zone 42 Barangays 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, and 416
Zone 43 Barangays 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 427, and 428
Zone 44 Barangays 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 447, 448, and 449
Zone 45 Barangays 450, 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457, 458, 459, 460, and 461
Zone 46 Barangays 462, 463, 464, 465, 466, 467, 468, 469, 470, and 471
Zone 47 Barangays 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478, 479, 480, and 481
Zone 48 Barangays 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487, 488, 489, 490, and 491
Zone 49 Barangays 492, 493, 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, 499, 500, and 501
Zone 50 Barangays 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 509, 510, and 511
Zone 51 Barangays 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519, and 520
Zone 52 Barangays 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529, 530, and 531
Zone 53 Barangays 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537, 538, 539, 540, and 541
Zone 54 Barangays 542, 543, 544, 545, 546, 547, 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 553, and 554
Zone 55 Barangays 555, 556, 557, 558, 559, 560, 561, 562, 563, 564, 565, 566, 567, and 568
Zone 56 Barangays 569, 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 575, 576, 577, 578, 579, and 580
Zone 57 Barangays 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, and 586

Etymology

"Sampaloc" or "Sampalok" is the native Tagalog word for the tamarind fruit. The place was likely named after it due to tamarind trees that may have been rampant in the area.[2]

History

Archdiocesan Shrine of Our Lady of Loreto

The founding of Sampaloc as a town coincided with its establishment as a parish independent of Santa Ana de Sapa in 1613. At the time, it included what is now Pandacan which was separated from it in 1712.[3] Sampaloc would comprise ten barrios ― Bacood, Balic-Balic, Bilarang Hipon, Calubcub, Manggahan, Nagtahan, San Isidro, San Roque, Santa Mesa, and Santol.[4]

Outbreak of the Philippine-American War

Main article: Philippine–American War § Outbreak of war

Following the Philippine Revolution against Spain and the Treaty of Paris of 1898 which seceded the Philippines to the United States, the subsequent arrival of American colonial troops shortly drew animosity between both American troops and Filipino troops.[5]

When a detachment of Philippine Revolutionary Army troops attempted to cross the San Juan River Bridge, American troops returned fire. This event was memorialized with a historical marker which had stood on the bridge until it was ordered to be moved in 2003 after studies by Dr. Benito J. Legarda concluded that the shot was not fired at the bridge, but was instead fired somewhere between Blockhouse 7 (within the city limits of Manila) and Barrio Santol at Silenco Street (now part of Sampaloc) on the connecting road that is now Sociego Street.[6]

American colonial era

In 1901, with the chartering of the city of Manila under the American-led Taft Commission,[7] where most of Sampaloc, with the exception of the barrio of Bilarang Hipon, would be absorbed by the city of Manila when its borders were extended outside the walled city now known as Intramuros.

Contemporary period

In 1996, Ramon Bagatsing Jr., the then-representative of Manila's 4th district, launched a program called the "Sampaloc Experiment", which sought to implement the then-new subject of computer education within the district's public schools as a trial program for the rest of the country.[8]

Education

University of Santo Tomas Main Building

Education in Sampaloc is handled by the Division of City Schools – Manila. Sampaloc is also home to some universities and colleges part of the University Belt such as Far Eastern University, Informatics, Mary Chiles College, National University, Perpetual Help College of Manila, Philippine College of Health Sciences, Philippine School of Business Administration, University of the East, University of Manila, and University of Santo Tomas.

Transportation

Intersection of España Boulevard, Morayta Street, and Lerma Street
Intersection of España Boulevard, Morayta Street, and Lerma Street

Sampaloc is the hub of major national bus transportation carriers. Among the bus companies in Sampaloc with their terminal are: Fariñas Transit Company, GV Florida Transport, Victory Liner, Partas, Maria De Leon, RCJ Trans, RCJ Lines, Five Star Bus Company, Northern Luzon Bus Line and Dalin liner and other southern Luzon buses.

Sampaloc is served by two Philippine National Railways station: Laon Laan and España station. It is also served by LRT Line 2 Legarda station and LRT Line 1 Blumentritt Station in Santa Cruz.

Main thoroughfares in Sampaloc are S.H. Loyola (formerly Lepanto), Vicente Cruz, M. De La Fuente, P. Florentino, Blumentritt, Aurora Boulevard, Dapitan, Laon Laan, Dimasalang, Maria Clara, Maceda, Padre Campa, Padre Noval, Tomas Earnshaw (Bustillos), Legarda, Gastambide, Recto Avenue, Lerma, Nicanor Reyes (Morayta), Lacson Avenue and España Boulevard.

See also

References

  1. ^ Final Results - 2007 Census of Population Archived 2012-07-16 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Merrill, Elmer Drew (1903). A Dictionary of the Plant Names of the Philippine Islands. Manila: Bureau of Public Print. p. 8.
  3. ^ "May 30, 1712: Araw ng Pandacan" (in Tagalog). Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  4. ^ Hee Limin; Low Boon Liang; Heng Chye Kiang (2010). On Asian Streets and Public Space, Volume 1. Singapore: NUS Press. p. 94. ISBN 978-9971-69-490-6. Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  5. ^ "The Birth of an Army". Armed Forces of the Philippines Museum. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  6. ^ Fernandez, Doreen G.; Legarda, Benito J. (2002). "Review of The Hills of Sampaloc: The Opening Actions of the Philippine-American War February 4-5, 1899, Benito J. Legarda, Jr". Philippine Studies. 50 (3): 444–446. ISSN 0031-7837.
  7. ^ Act No. 183 (31 July 1901), An act to incorporate the City of Manila, retrieved 13 July 2021
  8. ^ Beltran, Raul S. (September 30, 1996). "Public school computerization experiment gets solons' support". Manila Standard. Kamahalan Publishing Corp. p. 3. Retrieved May 16, 2022.