.mw-parser-output .hidden-begin{box-sizing:border-box;width:100%;padding:5px;border:none;font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .hidden-title{font-weight:bold;line-height:1.6;text-align:left}.mw-parser-output .hidden-content{text-align:left}You can help expand this article with text translated from the corresponding article in Japanese. (September 2018) Click [show] for important translation instructions. Machine translation, like DeepL or Google Translate, is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English Wikipedia. Consider adding a topic to this template: there are already 3,794 articles in the main category, and specifying|topic= will aid in categorization. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary accompanying your translation by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation. A model attribution edit summary is Content in this edit is translated from the existing Japanese Wikipedia article at [[:ja:盛岡市]]; see its history for attribution. You should also add the template ((Translated|ja|盛岡市)) to the talk page. For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.
Morioka
盛岡市
Morioka City Montage
Morioka City Montage
Flag of Morioka
Official seal of Morioka
Map
Map of Iwate Prefecture with Morioka highlighted in pink
Location of Morioka
Morioka is located in Japan
Morioka
Morioka
 
Coordinates: 39°42′7.5″N 141°09′16.2″E / 39.702083°N 141.154500°E / 39.702083; 141.154500
CountryJapan
RegionTōhoku
PrefectureIwate
First official recorded4th century AD
City SettledApril 1, 1889
Government
 • MayorShigeru Uchidate (from September 2023)[citation needed]
Area
 • Total886.47 km2 (342.27 sq mi)
Population
 (August 1, 2023)
 • Total283,981
 • Density320/km2 (830/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
Symbols 
• TreeKatsura
• FlowerRabbit-ear iris
• BirdWagtail
Phone number019-651-4111
Address12-2 Uchimaru, Morioka-shi, Iwate-ken 020-8530
WebsiteOfficial website

Morioka (盛岡市, Morioka-shi) is the capital city of Iwate Prefecture located in the Tōhoku region of northern Japan. On 1 August 2023, the city had an estimated population of 283,981 in 132,719 households,[1] and a population density of 320 per square kilometre (830/sq mi). The total area of the city is 886.47 square kilometres (342.27 sq mi).

Geography

Morioka is located in the Kitakami Basin [ja] in central Iwate Prefecture, at the confluence of three rivers, the Kitakami, the Shizukuishi and the Nakatsu. The Kitakami River is the second largest river on the Pacific side of Japan (after the Tone River) and the longest in the Tōhoku region. It runs through the city from north to south and has a number of dams within the city boundaries, including the Shijūshida Dam and Gandō Dam. An active volcano, Mount Iwate, dominates the view to the northwest of the city. Mount Himekami is to the north and Mount Hayachine can sometimes be seen to the southeast.[citation needed]

Surrounding municipalities

Iwate Prefecture

Demographics

Per Japanese census data,[2] the population of Morioka peaked at around the year 2000 and has slightly declined since.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1960 155,575—    
1970 226,868+45.8%
1980 272,814+20.3%
1990 292,632+7.3%
2000 302,857+3.5%
2010 298,572−1.4%
2020 289,731−3.0%

Climate

Morioka has a cold, humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa) characterized by warm, short summers and long, cold winters with heavy snowfall. The average annual temperature in Morioka is 10.2 °C (50.4 °F). The average annual rainfall is 1,314 millimetres (51.7 in) with July as the wettest month. The temperatures are at their highest on average in August, at around 23.7 °C (74.7 °F), and lowest on average in January, at around −2.4 °C (27.7 °F).[3]

Climate data for Morioka (1991−2020 normals, extremes 1923−present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13.2
(55.8)
15.2
(59.4)
21.0
(69.8)
29.0
(84.2)
33.6
(92.5)
33.7
(92.7)
37.2
(99.0)
36.6
(97.9)
34.7
(94.5)
29.2
(84.6)
21.3
(70.3)
17.9
(64.2)
37.2
(99.0)
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) 2.0
(35.6)
3.2
(37.8)
7.5
(45.5)
14.4
(57.9)
20.3
(68.5)
24.1
(75.4)
27.1
(80.8)
28.4
(83.1)
24.3
(75.7)
17.9
(64.2)
10.9
(51.6)
4.5
(40.1)
15.4
(59.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) −1.6
(29.1)
−0.9
(30.4)
2.6
(36.7)
8.7
(47.7)
14.5
(58.1)
18.8
(65.8)
22.4
(72.3)
23.5
(74.3)
19.3
(66.7)
12.6
(54.7)
6.2
(43.2)
0.8
(33.4)
10.6
(51.1)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) −5.2
(22.6)
−4.8
(23.4)
−1.8
(28.8)
3.2
(37.8)
9.1
(48.4)
14.2
(57.6)
18.8
(65.8)
19.8
(67.6)
15.2
(59.4)
7.9
(46.2)
1.8
(35.2)
−2.5
(27.5)
6.3
(43.3)
Record low °C (°F) −20.6
(−5.1)
−17.7
(0.1)
−17.1
(1.2)
−7.8
(18.0)
−2.0
(28.4)
1.3
(34.3)
4.3
(39.7)
7.4
(45.3)
2.5
(36.5)
−3.4
(25.9)
−8.6
(16.5)
−17.7
(0.1)
−20.6
(−5.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 49.4
(1.94)
48.0
(1.89)
82.1
(3.23)
85.4
(3.36)
106.5
(4.19)
109.4
(4.31)
197.5
(7.78)
185.4
(7.30)
151.7
(5.97)
108.7
(4.28)
85.6
(3.37)
70.2
(2.76)
1,279.9
(50.39)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 63
(25)
55
(22)
39
(15)
3
(1.2)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
6
(2.4)
44
(17)
209
(82)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.5 mm) 11.9 10.5 13.2 12.2 12.3 10.5 14.6 12.5 12.5 12.4 13.8 12.6 149.0
Average relative humidity (%) 73 71 67 65 68 74 80 79 80 78 76 75 74
Mean monthly sunshine hours 115.6 124.8 157.8 171.4 188.0 161.3 130.5 145.3 128.8 141.3 117.7 103.7 1,686.3
Source: Japan Meteorological Agency[4][5]

History

Morioka Castle

The area of present-day Morioka has been continuously inhabited since the Japanese Paleolithic period. Numerous Jōmon, Yayoi and Kofun period tombs and remains have been found. The Emishi inhabited the area into the Heian period. During the Enryaku era of the Heian period, Sakanoue no Tamuramaro, was ordered north to Shiwa Castle in 803 AD, as a military center to extend the domination of the Yamato dynasty over Mutsu Province. The area was later ruled by the Abe clan until their destruction during the Former Nine Years War at the hands of the Minamoto and Kiyohara clans. The Kiyohara were in turn defeated in the Gosannen War and the area came under the control of the Ōshū Fujiwara Clan based in Hiraizumi, to the south of Morioka. After the Ōshū Fujiwara were destroyed by Minamoto no Yoritomo at the start of the Kamakura period, the area was disputed by several samurai clans until the Nanbu clan, based in Sannohe to the north, expanded their territory during the Sengoku period and built Kozukata Castle in 1592.

Following the Battle of Sekigahara and the formal recognition of Morioka Domain under the Tokugawa shogunate, Kozukata Castle was renamed Morioka Castle.[6] Its name was changed from 森岡 to 盛岡 (both read as "Morioka")[7] During the Boshin War of the Meiji Restoration, Morioka Domain was a key member of the pro-Tokugawa Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei.

After the start of the Meiji period, the former Morioka Domain became Morioka Prefecture in 1870, and part of Iwate Prefecture from 1872. With the establishment of the modern municipality system on April 1, 1889, the city of Morioka was established as the capital of Iwate Prefecture. The city was connected by train to Tokyo in 1890. The city emerged from World War II with very little damage, having been subject to only two minor air raids during the war.[8]

On January 10, 2006, the village of Tamayama was merged into Morioka. Morioka was proclaimed a core city in 2008, with increased local autonomy.

During the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, Morioka was hit by a 6.1 earthquake, and numerous aftershocks, but with little damage other than extensive power outages.[9]

Government

Morioka City Hall

Morioka has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 38 members. Morioka contributes ten seats to the Iwate Prefectural legislature. In terms of national politics, the town is part of Iwate first district of the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

Education

Colleges and university

High schools

Morioka has eight public high schools operated by the Iwate Prefectural Board of Education.

There is also one public high school operated by the city government and ten private high schools

Transportation

Railway

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) - Tōhoku Shinkansen

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) - Tōhoku Main Line

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) - Tazawako Line (Akita Shinkansen)

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) - Yamada Line

East Japan Railway Company (JR East) - Hanawa Line

Iwate Ginga Railway Line

Highway

Local attractions

Sports

Sports venues

Sports teams

Religion

Temples and shrines

Sansa Odori festival

Cuisine

Morioka attracts tourists with local noodles such as jajamen, reimen, and wanko soba. Brewing is also a thriving industry of the city. Nambu Senbei, a type of rice cracker, is considered a local specialty.

Media

International relations

Notable people

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References

  1. ^ Morioka City official statistics (in Japanese)
  2. ^ Morioka population statistics
  3. ^ Morioka climate data
  4. ^ 気象庁 / 平年値(年・月ごとの値). Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  5. ^ https://twitter.com/sayakasofiamori/status/1759319506797875444
  6. ^ 不来方 [Kozukata]. Dijitaru Daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2013. OCLC 56431036. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2013-02-01.
  7. ^ "【地名の由来】市名". Archived from the original on 2014-03-16. Retrieved 2013-09-07.
  8. ^ Ministry of Home Affairs of Japan (in Japanese)
  9. ^ http://www.marketwatch.com/story/new-61-magnitude-quake-hits-near-morioka-japan-2011-03-11 - retrieved March 14, 2011
  10. ^ Morioka Castle Ruins Agency for Cultural Affairs (in Japanese)
  11. ^ "志波城跡 しわじょうあと". Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 25 December 2016. (in Japanese)
  12. ^ "岩手銀行(旧盛岡銀行)旧本店本館". Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 25 April 2020. (in Japanese)
  13. ^ "International Exchange". List of Affiliation Partners within Prefectures. Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR). Archived from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 21 November 2015.
  14. ^ Tucker, Spencer (2005). World War I: Encyclopedia, Volume 1. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO. p. 539. ISBN 978-1851094202.
  15. ^ ミラノコレクションA.T. [Milano Collection A.T.]. New Japan Pro-Wrestling (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 2010-06-18. Retrieved 2014-02-03.