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Edogawa
江戸川区
Edogawa City[1]
Furukawa Waterside Park in Edogawa
Location of Edogawa in Tokyo Metropolis
Edogawa
Edogawa
Location in Japan
Coordinates: 35°42′N 139°53′E / 35.700°N 139.883°E / 35.700; 139.883Coordinates: 35°42′N 139°53′E / 35.700°N 139.883°E / 35.700; 139.883
CountryJapan
RegionKantō
PrefectureTokyo Metropolis
First official recorded721 AD
As City of TokyoOctober 1, 1932
As Special ward of TokyoJuly 1, 1943
Government
 • MayorTakeshi Saitō (since April 2019)
Area
 • Total49.90 km2 (19.27 sq mi)
Population
 (January 1, 2020)
 • Total695,797
 • Density13,680/km2 (35,400/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+09:00 (JST)
Websitewww.city.edogawa.tokyo.jp
Symbols
FlowerRhododendron
TreeCinnamonum camphora
Kasai Junction, Shuto Expressway
Kasai Junction, Shuto Expressway

Edogawa (江戸川区, Edogawa-ku) is one of 23 special wards located in Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. It takes its name from the Edo River that runs from north to south along the eastern edge of the ward. In English, it uses the name Edogawa City.

The easternmost of the wards, it shares boundaries with the cities of Urayasu and Ichikawa in Chiba Prefecture (to the east) and with the wards of Katsushika (to the north), Sumida and Kōtō (to the west). It meets the city of Matsudo in Chiba at a point.

Edogawa has a sister-city relationship with Gosford, New South Wales, Australia. Domestically, it has friendship ties with the cities of Azumino in Nagano Prefecture and Tsuruoka in Yamagata Prefecture.

As of January 1, 2020, the ward has an estimated population of 695,797, and a population density of 13,925 persons per km².[citation needed] The total area is 49.90 km².

History

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (May 2021)

The ward was founded in 1937 with the merger of seven towns and villages in Minami-Katsushika District: the towns of Koiwa and Komatsugawa, and the villages of Kasai, Matsue, Mizue, Shinozaki and Shikamoto.

Demographics

Edogawa is notable for its large Indian population. There were 3,758 Indians living in the ward as of January 2018, centered in the Nishikasai neighborhood. Around 30% of Indians in Tokyo, and 10% of all Indians in Japan, live in Edogawa.[2]

Districts and neighborhoods

Sites

Notable people

Education

Public elementary and junior high schools are operated by the Edogawa Board of Education.

Public high schools are operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Board of Education.

Private High Schools:

International schools:

Universities

Transportation

Rail

East Japan Railway Company
Chūō-Sōbu Line
Keiyō Line
Keisei Electric Railway
Keisei Main Line
Toei
Toei Shinjuku Line
Tokyo Metro
Tozai Line

Highway

See also

References

  1. ^ Multilingual 江戸川区公式ホームページ. City.edogawa.tokyo.jp. Archived from the original on November 19, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  2. ^ "Tokyo's Nishikasai a second home for Indians in Japan". The Statesman. May 20, 2018. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 14, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ 東京都立葛西工業高等学校 – Tokyo Metropolitan Kasai Technical High School. Kasaikogyo-h.metro.tokyo.jp. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  5. ^ 東京都立葛西南高等学校. Kasaiminami-h.metro.tokyo.jp. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 21, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 3, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 30, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 14, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ 江戸川女子中学校・高等学校. Edojo.jp. Retrieved August 1, 2018.