Biju Janata Dal
AbbreviationBJD
PresidentNaveen Patnaik
Lok Sabha LeaderPinaki Mishra
Rajya Sabha LeaderSasmit Patra
FounderNaveen Patnaik[1][2]
Founded26 December 1997 (26 years ago) (1997-12-26)
Split fromJanata Dal
Headquarters6R/3, Unit-6, Forest Park, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
Student wingBiju Chhatra Janata Dal
Youth wingBiju Yuva Janata Dal
Women's wingBiju Mahila Janata Dal
Labour wingBiju Shramik Samukhya
Peasant's wingBiju Krushak Janata Dal
IdeologyRegionalism[3]
Secularism[4]
Economic nationalism[5]
Political positionCentre-left[6]
Colours  Green
ECI StatusState Party[7]
Alliance
Seats in Lok Sabha
12 / 543
Seats in Rajya Sabha
9 / 245
Seats in Odisha Legislative Assembly
111 / 147
Number of states and union territories in government
1 / 31
Election symbol
Conch
Party flag
Website
www.bjdodisha.org.in

The Biju Janata Dal (transl.Biju People's Party; abbr. BJD) is an Indian regional political party with significant influence in the state of Odisha. It was founded by the former minister of mines and minerals of the Republic of India Naveen Patnaik on 26 December 1997 as a breakaway faction from the Janata Dal.[8] The BJD is led by its founder as president of the party. The headquarters of the party is located in Forest Park, Bhubaneswar.

Electoral record

The BJD won nine seats in the 1998 general election and Naveen was named Minister for Mines. In the 1999 general elections, the BJD won 10 seats. The party won a majority of seats in the Odisha Legislative Assembly in the 2000 and 2004 elections in alliance with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). The BJD won 11 Lok Sabha seats in the 2004 elections. In the aftermath of the 2008 Kandhamal riots, the BJD parted ways with the BJP in the Lok Sabha and Assembly elections held in 2009, citing communalism and differences in seat sharing. During the election, BJD won 14 seats and secured a strong 108 legislative seats out of 147 seats in the 2009 Odisha legislative elections. Biju Janata Dal won a huge victory in the 2014 general election, securing 20 of the 21 Odishan Lok Sabha seats and 117 of the 147 Odisha Legislative Assembly seats.[9] They were re-elected to power in Odisha in 2019, winning 112 of the 147 seats in the Odisha state assembly; however, their seats in the Lok Sabha were reduced to 12.[10][11] In 2022, BJD clean swept elections of Panchayat & urban local bodies in the state.[12]

Leadership

The highest decision-making body of the party is its Core Committee.

Electoral performance

Indian general elections

Lok Sabha Elections
Year Lok Sabha Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Outcome
1998 12th Naveen Patnaik 12
9 / 543
Increase 9 1.00% Steady 3,669,825 Government
1999 13th 12
10 / 543
Increase 1 1.20% Increase 0.20% 4,378,536
2004 14th 12
11 / 543
Increase 1 1.30% Increase 0.10% 5,082,849 Opposition
2009 15th 18
14 / 543
Increase 3 1.59% Increase 0.29% 6,612,552 Others
2014 16th 21
20 / 543
Increase 6 1.73% Increase 0.14% 9,489,946
2019 17th 21
12 / 543
Decrease 8 1.68% Decrease 0.05% 10,174,021
2024 18th TBD

State legislative assembly elections

Odisha Legislative Assembly Elections[14]
Year Assembly Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Outcome
2000 12th Naveen Patnaik 84
68 / 147
Increase 68 29.40% Steady 4,151,895 Government
2004 13th 84
61 / 147
Decrease 7 27.36% Decrease 2.04% 4,632,280
2009 14th 129
103 / 147
Increase 42 38.86% Increase 11.50% 6,903,641
2014 15th 147
117 / 147
Increase 14 43.35% Increase 4.49% 9,335,159
2019 16th 146
112 / 147
Decrease 5 44.71% Increase 1.36% 10,475,697
2024 17th TBD

List of party leaders

Presidents

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in office
Assumed office Left office Time in office
1 Naveen Patnaik
(1946–)
26 December 1997 Incumbent 26 years, 90 days

Legislative leaders

List of union cabinet ministers

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Portfolio Term in office Constituency
(House)
Prime Minister
Assumed office Left office Time in office
1 Naveen Patnaik
(1946–)
Ministry of Steel and Mines 19 March 1998 13 October 1999 1 year, 208 days Aska
(Lok Sabha)
Atal Bihari Vajpayee
Ministry of Mines and Minerals 13 October 1999 4 March 2000 143 days
2 Arjun Charan Sethi
(1941–2020)
Ministry of Water Resources 27 May 2000 22 May 2004 3 years, 361 days Bhadrak
(Lok Sabha)

List of union ministers of state (independent charge)

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Portfolio Term in office Constituency
(House)
Prime Minister
Assumed office Left office Time in office
1 Dilip Kumar Ray
(1954–)
Ministry of Coal 20 March 1998 13 October 1999 1 year, 207 days Odisha
(Rajya Sabha)
Atal Bihari Vajpayee
Ministry of Steel 13 October 1999 27 May 2000 227 days
2 Braja Kishore Tripathy
(1947–)
27 May 2000 22 May 2004 3 years, 361 days Puri
(Lok Sabha)

List of chief ministers

Chief Ministers of Odisha

Further information: List of chief ministers of Odisha

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in office Assembly
(Election)
Constituency Ministry
Assumed office Left office Time in office
1 Naveen Patnaik
(1946–)
5 March 2000 15 May 2004 24 years, 20 days 12th
(2000)
Hinjili Patnaik I
16 May 2004 21 May 2009 13th
(2004)
Patnaik II
22 May 2009 20 May 2014 14th
(2009)
Patnaik III
21 May 2014 28 May 2019 15th
(2014)
Patnaik IV
29 May 2019 Incumbent 16th
(2019)
Patnaik V

List of union ministers of state

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Portfolio Term in office Constituency
(House)
Cabinet Minister Prime Minister
Assumed office Left office Time in office
1 Dilip Kumar Ray
(1954–)
Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs 22 May 1998 22 October 1999 1 year, 153 days Odisha
(Rajya Sabha)
Madan Lal Khurana

P. R. Kumaramangalam


Pramod Mahajan

Atal Bihari Vajpayee

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ Kaminsky, A.P.; Long, R.D. (2011). India Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Republic. India Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Republic. ABC-CLIO. p. 97. ISBN 978-0-313-37462-3. Archived from the original on 15 February 2024. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  2. ^ Frontline. S. Rangarajan for Kasturi & Sons. 1998. p. 35. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  3. ^ "Naveen Patnaik's BJD is Now the Longest Surviving Regional Party in Odisha". Archived from the original on 20 May 2022. Retrieved 17 April 2022.
  4. ^ "Secular BJD blames 'failures'". Archived from the original on 17 April 2022. Retrieved 17 April 2022.
  5. ^ Capron, Laurence; Guillén, Mauro (12 October 2006). "Fighting economic nationalism in deals". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 10 December 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  6. ^ Capron, Laurence; Guillén, Mauro (12 October 2006). "Fighting economic nationalism in deals". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 10 December 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  7. ^ "List of Political Parties and Election Symbols main Notification Dated 18.01.2013" (PDF). India: Election Commission of India. 2013. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018. Retrieved 9 May 2013.
  8. ^ "Biju village protects Patnaik legacy, stands firmly behind BJD - Bhubaneswar News". The Times of India. 16 April 2019. Archived from the original on 1 October 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  9. ^ "Naveen Patnaik: Defying Modi wave, Odisha's 'Mr Clean' wins 5th straight term". Moneycontrol. 23 May 2019. Archived from the original on 6 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  10. ^ "Odisha Election Results 2019: BJD wins 112 assembly seats, BJP settles at 23". The Times of India. 24 May 2019. Archived from the original on 5 November 2022. Retrieved 23 June 2021.
  11. ^ "Odisha Lok Sabha Election Results 2019". NDTV.com. Archived from the original on 24 June 2021. Retrieved 23 June 2021.
  12. ^ "Odisha Municipal Elections 2022 Live Results: Odisha Urban Polls Latest News | Mayors, Chairpersons, Corporators, Councilors Results - OTV News". Odisha Municipal Elections 2022 Live Results: Odisha Urban Polls Latest News | Mayors, Chairpersons, Corporators, Councilors Results - OTV News. Archived from the original on 24 May 2023. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  13. ^ "Odisha civic polls: Subash Singh reigns supreme in Cuttack". The New Indian Express. Archived from the original on 10 August 2023. Retrieved 8 August 2023.
  14. ^ "Odisha Assembly Election Results". Election Commission of India. Archived from the original on 13 December 2023. Retrieved 5 April 2021.