Great Britain at the
2020 Summer Olympics
IOC codeGBR
NOCBritish Olympic Association
in Tokyo, Japan
Competitors376 in 28 sports
Flag bearers (opening)Hannah Mills
Moe Sbihi[2]
Flag bearer (closing)Laura Kenny[1]
Medals
Ranked 4th
Gold
22
Silver
21
Bronze
22
Total
65
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
1906 Intercalated Games

Great Britain, or in full Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the team of the British Olympic Association (BOA), which represents the United Kingdom, competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Originally scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020, the Games were postponed to 23 July to 8 August 2021, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.[3]

British athletes have appeared in every Summer Olympic Games of the modern era, alongside those of Australia, France, Greece, and Switzerland, although Great Britain is the only team to have won at least one gold medal at all of them. This streak was maintained in Tokyo when Adam Peaty successfully defended his 100 metre breaststroke title on the third morning of the Games.

The first medals of the Games for Great Britain were won by martial artists with taekwondo-ka Bradly Sinden guaranteeing Team GB at least a silver medal by qualifying for the final of the -68 kg event in taekwondo. Before the final took place, however, judoka Chelsie Giles secured a bronze medal in the 52 kg class via the repechage.

Summary

The 2020 Games saw members of the Great Britain team achieve a number of prominent milestones. In the pool, Adam Peaty became the first British swimmer to successfully defend an Olympic gold medal, winning the 100 metre breaststroke for the second time. The British swimming team also had its most successful Olympics in history winning eight medals (with four golds) eclipsing the previous Olympic swimming best of seven medals (which also included four golds) which had stood since the London 1908 Games (113 years). This included a 1–2 finish in the final of the Men's 200m freestyle for Duncan Scott (who took silver) and Tom Dean (who took gold) which was the first time British swimmers had achieved this in any Olympic swimming event since 1908. Scott also became Britain's most successful athlete in any sport at a single games in terms of number of medals won with four medals in total made up of one gold and three silver medals. However, Adam Peaty, James Guy and Tom Dean were more successful in terms of gold medals winning two golds to Scott's single gold. By winning gold alongside James Guy and Adam Peaty in the mixed 4x100 metres medley relay Freya Anderson, Kathleen Dawson and Anna Hopkin became the first British female swimmers since Rebecca Adlington took double individual gold in the 400 metre freestyle and 800m freestyle events at the Beijing 2008 games to win an Olympic gold medal. However, no British female swimmer won a medal in any of the individual women's events making the medals from mixed medley the only ones won by British female swimmers at the Games.

On 4 August Sky Brown became the youngest British Olympian ever to win a medal when she won bronze in the Women's Park Skateboarding at the age of 13 years and 28 days.

Gymnast Max Whitlock also clinched his second consecutive Olympic title on the pommel horse becoming one of the most successful gymnasts ever in the history of that specific apparatus – having also won three World Championship titles in the discipline – and the fourth man in Olympic history to successfully defend their pommel horse title. In doing do he cemented his position as Great Britain's most successful Olympic gymnast with six medals overall including three golds. Bryony Page in the Women's Trampoline competition claimed her second consecutive Olympic medal in the event with a bronze medal having won a silver in Rio. A team containing Jennifer Gadirova, Jessica Gadirova, Alice Kinsella and Amelie Morgan also won a Bronze in the Women's Team Artistic All-Round event. giving the gymnastics squad three medals at Tokyo 2020 overall down from the seven achieved by gymnastics in Rio in 2016.

Keely Hodgkinson and Laura Muir secured silver medals in the Women's 800 metres and 1500 metres respectively. These were the first medals in either of these events for a British athlete since Kelly Holmes won double gold at the Athens 2004 Games. Josh Kerr by winning bronze in the Men's 1500m also became the first British athlete to win an Olympic medal in that event since Seoul 1988 where Peter Elliott won a silver medal. Holly Bradshaw also won her first medal in either Olympic or outdoor World Championship competition with bronze in the women's pole vault. The women's 4x100 relay squad also won a bronze.

Despite failing to medal in the men's match sprint Jason Kenny took sole ownership of the record as Great Britain's most successful Olympian, most decorated Olympian and the most successful and most decorated Olympic cyclist of any nation, with silver in the men's team sprint and gold in the men's keirin. This was the fourth consecutive keirin title for Great Britain, and took Kenny's career tally to seven gold and two silver medals and was the fourth consecutive Olympics in which he had won one or more golds. His wife Laura Kenny lost her omnium title after a major crash in the opening scratch race, and only managed a silver medal in the women's team pursuit. However, in the inaugural Olympic women's Madison she and partner Katie Archibald won the event, gaining a lap and winning all but two of the intermediate sprints. This took her career tally to five golds and one silver making her the most decorated British female Olympian, and the most successful and most decorated female Olympic cyclist of any nation. Together the Kennys also became the most successful married Olympians in history where both partners have won a gold medal. Britain's other track cycling gold came courtesy of Matt Walls in the men's omnium- the first time a male British Olympic cyclist has won the Olympic title in that event. Walls also won a silver medal alongside Ethan Hayter in the men's Madison event.

On the waves, Giles Scott secured Great Britain's sixth consecutive gold medal in sailing's Finn class which was making its final Olympic appearance, while Hannah Mills became Great Britain's most successful female Olympic sailor defending her Women's 470 title with Eilidh McIntyre having won the same class with Saskia Clark in 2016. McIntyre was emulating her father Michael who had won gold in the Star class alongside Bryn Vaile at the 1988 Games in Seoul.

On a less positive note a number of iconic 'streaks' of British success were broken. The men's team pursuit title left British hands for the first time since 2004, as did the men's team sprint with both Ed Clancy and Jason Kenny denied fourth consecutive gold medals in the same event. The men's match sprint in cycling also left British hands for the first time since 2004, although Jack Carlin won a bronze medal. The men's coxless four lost the Olympic title for the first time since 1996, while the rowing team won no gold medals for the first time since 1980 winning only 2 medals in total across the whole Olympic rowing regatta.

Despite winning six medals in total, these Olympics the first time since 1996 that Great Britain's athletics team failed to win a gold medal. This was partly due to unfortunate injuries to world champions Dina Asher-Smith (200 metres) and Katarina Johnson-Thompson (Heptathlon) who were seen as Britain's best medal hopes in the athletics events. The men's 4 × 100 metres relay squad were also pipped to gold by Italy by 0.01 seconds on the finish line having been leading going into the anchor leg. However, Great Britain could lose their medal after a member of the men's 4x100 metres athletics quartet CJ Ujah was revealed on 12 August 2021 to have failed a drugs test with Ujah privisionally suspended by the Athletics Integrity Unit following the games pending further investigation . The matter will be referred to the Court of Arbitration For Sport Anti-Doping Division to decide if the British 4x100 male quartet should be disqualified from the final results.[4]

A number of British defending champions from 2016 (including some 'double' champions who won gold medals in 2012 and 2016) either were not selected, or were unable to retain their titles, including Mo Farah, Alistair Brownlee, Jade Jones, Charlotte Dujardin and Andy Murray. In comparison, three former world champions, but long time 'nearly men' on the Olympic stage finally reached the top step of the rostrum, Jonathan Brownlee winning the inaugural triathlon mixed relay, James Guy in both the men's 4 × 200 metre freestyle relay and the mixed medley relay, and Tom Daley, winning gold in the men's 10 metre synchro with debutant Matty Lee, before his bronze in the individual event made him the first British diver to win four career Olympic medals.

Great Britain had some notable success in new sports and events, winning the inaugural gold medals for women's BMX freestyle, mixed 4 x 100 metre medley swimming relay (in a new world record), women's madison and the triathlon mixed team relay, and medals in men's BMX freestyle, women's skateboarding and women's featherweight boxing. The women's +87 kg weightlifting event was technically a new event, but was in reality simply an adjusted version of the existing heavyweight event. Nonetheless, Emily Campbell's silver medal was the first ever won in weightlifting by a British woman, the first British weightlifting medal for either sex since 1984 and the first at a non-boycotted Games since Louis Martin medalled in consecutive Olympics in 1960 and 1964. Indeed, the weightlifting event at the Games was a significant success for Great Britain, with top-seven finishes for all four selected lifters, and Sarah Davies coming agonisingly close to winning a second silver medal in the −64 kg class.

Great Britain also had great success in both of the men's and women's modern pentathlon events with Kate French taking gold in the women's event, while Joseph Choong became the first British male modern pentathlete to win an individual medal when taking gold in the men's event. The victories of French and Choong marked the first time since the introduction of the women's event in 2000 that a 'double' had been achieved, with the same nation winning both events.

Medallists

Further information: 2020 Summer Olympics medal table and List of 2020 Summer Olympics medal winners

Multiple medallists

The following Team GB competitors won multiple medals at the 2020 Olympic Games.

Charlotte Dujardin's two bronze medals added to her two golds from London 2012 and her gold and silver from Rio 2016 made her the first female British athlete to win six Olympic medals, a feat later equalled by Laura Kenny. Dujardin also became the first female British athlete to win multiple medals at three consecutive Games (two in London, two in Rio and two in Tokyo), a feat which was again equalled by Kenny. Two medals for Jason Kenny made him the first British athlete of either sex to win multiple medals at four successive games (2 in 2008, 2 in 2012, 3 in 2016 and 2 in 2020), a feat also unequalled by anyone in the Olympic sport of cycling.[5] With silver in the Men's 4 × 100 m medley relay, Duncan Scott becomes the first British Olympian to win four medals in a single Games.

Name Medal Sport Event
Adam Peaty  Gold
 Gold
 Silver
Swimming Men's 100 m breaststroke
Mixed 4 × 100 m medley relay
Men's 4 × 100 m medley relay
James Guy  Gold
 Gold
 Silver
Swimming Men's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay
Mixed 4 × 100 m medley relay
Men's 4 × 100 m medley relay
Tom Dean  Gold
 Gold
Swimming Men's 200 m freestyle
Men's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay
Duncan Scott  Gold
 Silver
 Silver
 Silver
Swimming Men's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay
Men's 200 m freestyle
Men's 200 metre individual medley
Men's 4 × 100 m medley relay*
Georgia Taylor-Brown  Gold
 Silver
Triathlon Mixed relay
Women's individual
Alex Yee  Gold
 Silver
Triathlon Mixed relay
Men's individual
Tom McEwen  Gold
 Silver
Equestrian Team eventing
Individual eventing
Laura Kenny  Gold
 Silver
Cycling Women's Madison
Women's team pursuit
Jason Kenny  Gold
 Silver
Cycling Men's keirin
Men's team sprint
Katie Archibald  Gold
 Silver
Cycling Women's Madison
Women's team pursuit
Matthew Walls  Gold
 Silver
Cycling Men's omnium
Men's Madison
Tom Daley  Gold
 Bronze
Diving Men's synchronized
10 metre platform

Men's 10 metre platform
Jack Carlin  Silver
 Bronze
Cycling Men's team sprint
Men's sprint
Luke Greenbank  Silver
 Bronze
Swimming Men's 4 × 100 m medley relay
Men's 200 m backstroke
Charlotte Dujardin  Bronze
 Bronze
Equestrian Team dressage
Individual dressage

Administration

On 9 April 2018, the British Olympic Association announced that Mark England would be their Chef de Mission in Tokyo following his success in this role at Rio 2016. Under his leadership Team GB had become the first nation to increase its medal haul at the summer games after acting as host at London 2012.[6]

On 9 July 2021, UK Sport announced they had set a medal target of 45–70 medals for the team. No individual targets have been set for each sport as it was considered impossible to properly evaluate the position of each sport in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, and the large scale disruption to both training and sports events that entailed.[7]

Team GB Medal Target
Event Medal Target 2012 Medals 2016 Medals Medals won Target met
Overall 45–70 65 67 65 checkY

Competitors

The team included nine sets of siblings: Tom and Emily Ford (Rowing), Jennifer and Jessica Gadirova (Gymnastics), Charlotte and Mathilda Hodgkins-Byrne (Rowing), Joe and Max Litchfield (Swimming), Luke and Pat McCormack (Boxing), Andy and Jamie Murray (Tennis), Tiffany Porter and Cindy Sember (Athletics), Hannah and Jodie Williams (Athletics), and Adam and Simon Yates (Cycling). The Gadirovas, McCormacks and Yateses are all twins. In addition, Hannah Martin was a member of the women's hockey team while her brother Harry Martin, a two time Olympian, was a travelling reserve for the men's team. There was also one married couple in multi gold medallists: Jason and Laura Kenny (Cycling).

Dressage rider Carl Hester was competing at his sixth Olympic Games. Only fellow equestrian rider Nick Skelton has represented Great Britain at more Games with seven appearances. Meanwhile, archer Naomi Folkard was making her fifth consecutive appearance. Among British female athletes only six time Olympians Tessa Sanderson and Alison Williamson have competed at more Games.

Sport Men Women Total
Archery 3 3 6
Artistic swimming 0 2 2
Athletics 37 40 77
Badminton 4 3 7
Boxing 7 4 11
Canoeing 3 5 8
Cycling 15 11 26
Diving 6 6 12
Equestrian 5 4 9
Fencing 1 0 1
Field hockey 16 16 32
Football 0 18 18
Golf 2 2 4
Gymnastics 4 6 10
Judo 1 5 6
Modern pentathlon 2 2 4
Rowing 19 22 41
Rugby sevens 12 12 24
Sailing 8 7 15
Shooting 2 3 5
Skateboarding 0 2 2
Sport climbing 0 1 1
Swimming 18 14 32
Table tennis 2 1 3
Taekwondo 2 3 5
Tennis 5 1 6
Triathlon 2 3 5
Weightlifting 0 4 4
Total 176 200 376

In addition to the 376 strong British delegation Team GB confirmed the selection of 22 travelling reserves for various sports.[8] These included the reserves for football, hockey and rugby 7s. On 3 July 2021, the IOC, having consulted with the individual federations of these three sports together with those of handball and water polo, announced that each team would be able to select their teams from both the original squads and the travelling reserves without the need to permanently replace one individual with another. This effectively increased the size of the squads from 18 to 22 for football, 16 to 18 for hockey and 12 to 13 for rugby 7s.[9]

Archery

Main articles: Archery at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Archery at the 2020 Summer Olympics - Qualification

British archers qualified each for the men's and women's events by reaching the quarterfinal stage of their respective team recurves at the 2019 World Archery Championships in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.[10] The rules of qualification also stipulate that a nation that qualifies at least one male and one female archer, as Great Britain have done, is automatically entered in the mixed team event. On 21 April 2021, Team GB announced the selection of the six archers who will represent the team in Tokyo.[11]

Men
Athlete Event Ranking round Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Score Seed Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Tom Hall Individual 649 48  Shana (BAN)
L 3–7
Did not advance
Patrick Huston 658 25  D'Almeida (BRA)
L 1–7
Did not advance
James Woodgate 652 38  Abdullin (KAZ)
L 3–7
Did not advance
Tom Hall
Patrick Huston
James Woodgate
Team 1959 10 N/A  Indonesia (INA)
W 6–0
 Netherlands (NED)
L 3–5
Did not advance
Women
Athlete Event Ranking round Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Score Seed Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Sarah Bettles Individual 653 15  Acosta Giraldo (COL)
W 6–4
 Wu Jx (CHN)
L 2–6
Did not advance
Naomi Folkard 629 47  Wu Jx (CHN)
L 2–6
Did not advance
Bryony Pitman 634 38  Tan Y-t (TPE)
W 6–4
 Román (MEX)
W 6–2
 Osipova (ROC)
L 0–6
Did not advance
Sarah Bettles
Naomi Folkard
Bryony Pitman
Team 1916 9 N/A  Italy (ITA)
L 3–5
Did not advance
Mixed
Athlete Event Ranking round Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Score Seed Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Patrick Huston
Sarah Bettles
Team 1311 12  China (CHN)
W 5–3
 Mexico (MEX)
L 0–6
Did not advance

Artistic swimming

Main articles: Artistic swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Artistic swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain qualified two athletes to the artistic swimming duet competition as a result of Spain's success in the final Artistic Swimming Olympic Team Qualification competition event on 11 June 2021. Spain's elevation to the team event freed a quota place in the 2019 European Champions Cup competition inherited by Great Britain. This slot was then superseded by the top seven finish achieved by Great Britain itself at the final FINA Artistic Swimming Olympic Qualification Tournament. On 22 June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of Kate Shortman and Isabelle Thorpe for Tokyo.[12]

Athlete Event Technical routine Free routine (preliminary) Free routine (final)
Points Rank Points Total (technical + free) Rank Points Total (technical + free) Rank
Kate Shortman
Isabelle Thorpe
Duet 85.1548 14 84.7333 169.8881 14 Did not advance

Athletics

Main articles: Athletics at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Athletics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British athletes have achieved the entry standards, either by qualifying time or by world ranking, in several track and field events (up to a maximum of 3 athletes in each event):[13][14] The team will be selected based on the results of the 2021 British Athletics Championships ( 25 to 27 June) to be held in Manchester, England.[15] Relay qualification is achieved by a top eight finish at the 2019 World Athletics Championships in a relay event, or a top eight ranking in that event not including previously qualified nations. The first confirmed place was therefore assured when Great Britain finished fourth in the mixed 4 × 400 metres relay event at the Worlds in Doha. Great Britain secured top eight finishes, and therefore Olympic qualification, in the other four relay events in Doha on 5 and 6 October – along with the United States, they were the only teams to gain Olympic places in all five relay events at Doha.

In December 2019, UK Athletics confirmed the preselection of Callum Hawkins for the men's marathon. On 26 March 2021, at the 2021 British Athletics Marathon and 20km Walk Trial in Kew Gardens, Chris Thompson, Ben Connor, Stephanie Davis and Tom Bosworth confirmed qualification for Tokyo with a top two finish in their respective races, having already gained the qualification time.[16] On 1 April 2021, Team GB announced the selection of these five athletes together with marathon runners Jess Piasecki and Steph Twell for Tokyo.[17] On 4 June 2021, World Athletics confirmed that Cameron Corbishley and Dominic King had qualified by World Rankings for the Men's 50 km walk event. However, they have not met the qualification time requirements set out in British Athletics selection policy document and it remains to be seen whether they will be selected on the basis of future potential.[18]

On 29 June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of a further 65 athletes following the completion of the British trials. The squad of 72 includes reigning world champions Dina Asher-Smith and Katarina Johnson-Thompson subject to the latter proving her fitness.[19] On 2 July 2021, the final four athletes were confirmed by Team GB resulting in a 76 strong squad for Tokyo.[20] Laura Muir later withdrew from the women's 800 m to concentrate on the 1500 m and her place was taken by Alexandra Bell increasing the final squad to 77.[21]

Key
Track & road events
Men
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Zharnel Hughes 100 m Bye 10.04 3 Q 9.98 1 Q DSQ
Reece Prescod Bye 10.12 5 q DSQ Did not advance
Chijindu Ujah Bye 10.08 3 Q 10.11 5 Did not advance
Adam Gemili 200 m 1:58.58 7 N/A Did not advance
Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake 20.56 5 Did not advance
Oliver Dustin 800 m 1:46.94 6 N/A Did not advance
Elliot Giles 1:44.49 3 Q 1:44.75 3 Did not advance
Daniel Rowden 1:45.73 2 Q 1:44.38 5 Did not advance
Jake Heyward 1500 m 3:36.14 1 Q N/A 3:32.82 6 q 3:34.43 9
Josh Kerr 3:36.29 7 q 3:32.18 3 Q 3:29.05 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Jake Wightman 3:41.18 3 Q 3:33.48 1 Q 3:35.09 10
Andrew Butchart 5000 m 13:31.27 7 q N/A 13:09.97 11
Marc Scott 13:39.61 6 Did not advance
Sam Atkin 10000 m N/A DNF
Marc Scott 28:09.23 14
David King 110 m hurdles 13.55 6 q N/A 13.67 7 Did not advance
Andrew Pozzi 13.50 4 Q 13.32 4 q 13.30 7
Phil Norman 3000 m steeplechase 8:46.57 13 N/A Did not advance
Zak Seddon 8:43.29 14 Did not advance
Zharnel Hughes
Richard Kilty
Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake
Chijindu Ujah
4 × 100 m relay 38.02 2 Q N/A 37.51 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Joe Brier
Cameron Chalmers
Michael Ohioze
Lee Thompson
4 × 400 m relay 3:03.29 6 N/A Did not advance
Ben Connor Marathon N/A DNF
Callum Hawkins DNF
Chris Thompson 2:21.29 54
Tom Bosworth 20 km walk N/A 1:25:57 25
Callum Wilkinson 1:22:38 10
Women
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Dina Asher-Smith 100 m Bye 11.07 2 Q 11.05 3 Did not advance
Daryll Neita Bye 10.98 PB 2 Q 11.00 4 q 11.12 8
Asha Philip Bye 11.31 2 Q 11.30 8 Did not advance
Beth Dobbin 200 m 22.78 =SB 2 Q N/A 22.85 5 Did not advance
Ama Pipi 400 m 51.17 4 q N/A 51.59 7 Did not advance
Jodie Williams 50.99 1 Q 49.97 2 Q 49.97 6
Nicole Yeargin DSQ Did not advance
Alexandra Bell 800 m 2:00.96 4 q N/A 1:58.83 3 q 1:57.66 7
Keely Hodgkinson 2:01.59 2 Q 1:59.12 1 Q 1:55.88 NR 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Jemma Reekie 1:59.97 1 Q 1:59.77 2 Q 1:56.90 4
Laura Muir 1500 m 4:03.89 2 Q N/A 4:00.73 2 Q 3.54.50 NR 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Katie Snowden 4:02.77 6 Q 4:02.93 9 Did not advance
Revée Walcott-Nolan 4:06.23 7 Did not advance
Jessica Judd 5000 m 15:06.47 13 N/A Did not advance
Eilish McColgan 15:09.68 10
Amy-Eloise Markovc 15:03.22 9
Jessica Judd 10000 m N/A 31:56.80 17
Eilish McColgan 31:04.46 9
Tiffany Porter 100 m hurdles 12.85 4 Q N/A 12.86 5 Did not advance
Cindy Sember 13.00 4 Q 12.76 7 Did not advance
Meghan Beesley 400 m hurdles 55.91 7 N/A Did not advance
Jessie Knight DNF Did not advance
Jessica Turner 56.83 4 Q 1:00.36 7 Did not advance
Elizabeth Bird 3000 m steeplechase 9:24.34 5 q N/A 9:19.68 NR 9
Aimee Pratt 9:47.56 11 Did not advance
Dina Asher-Smith
Imani-Lara Lansiquot
Daryll Neita
Asha Philip
4 × 100 m relay 41.55 NR 1 Q N/A 41.88 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Zoey Clark[a]
Emily Diamond
Laviai Nielsen[a]
Ama Pipi
Jodie Williams
Nicole Yeargin
4 × 400 m relay 3:23.99 3 Q N/A 3:22.59 5
Stephanie Davis Marathon N/A 2:36:33 39
Jess Piasecki 2:55:39 71
Steph Twell 2:53:26 68
Mixed
Athlete Event Heat Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Niclas Baker
Cameron Chalmers
Zoey Clark[a]
Emily Diamond
Lee Thompson[a]
Nicole Yeargin
4 × 400 m relay 3:11.95 4 q 3:12.07 6
Field events
Men
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Ben Williams Triple jump 16.30 22 Did not advance
Tom Gale High jump 2.28 13 q 2.27 11
Harry Coppell Pole vault 5.65 =12 q 5.80 7
Scott Lincoln Shot put 20.42 18 Did not advance
Lawrence Okoye Discus throw NM Did not advance
Taylor Campbell Hammer throw 71.34 28 Did not advance
Nick Miller 76.93 3 Q 78.15 6
Women
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Abigail Irozuru Long jump 6.75 4 Q 6.51 11
Jazmin Sawyers 6.62 11 q 6.80 8
Lorraine Ugen 6.05 15 Did not advance
Emily Borthwick High jump 1.93 =16 Did not advance
Morgan Lake 1.95 7 Q DNS
Holly Bradshaw Pole vault 4.55 =1 q 4.85 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Sophie McKinna Shot put 17.81 18 Did not advance
Combined events – Women's heptathlon
Athlete Event 100H HJ SP 200 m LJ JT 800 m Final Rank
Katarina Johnson-Thompson Result 13.27 1.86 13.31 DSQ DNS DNF
Points 1084 1054 748 0 0

a Ran in the heats only.

Badminton

Main articles: Badminton at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Badminton at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered badminton players for each of the following events into the Olympic tournament based on the BWF World Race to Tokyo Rankings of 15 June 2021: one entry each in the men's and women's singles and a pair in the men's, women's, and mixed doubles.[22] On 28 June 2021, Team GB announced the squad of seven players who will represent the team in Tokyo.[23] Ben Lane and Sean Vendy were selected to compete in the men's doubles even though Rio 2016 bronze medallists Marcus Ellis and Chris Langridge finished ahead of them in the rankings.[22]

Athlete Event Group Stage Elimination Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Toby Penty Men's singles  Schäfer (GER)
W (21–18, 21–11)
 Wangcharoen (THA)
W (21–19, 21–12)
N/A 1 Q  Antonsen (DEN)
L (10–21, 15–21)
Did not advance
Kirsty Gilmour Women's singles  Shahzad (PAK)
W (21–14, 21–14)
 Yamaguchi (JPN)
L (9–21, 18–21)
N/A 2 Did not advance
Ben Lane
Sean Vendy
Men's doubles  Gideon /
Sukamuljo (INA)
L (15–21, 11–21)
 Lee Y /
Wang C-l (TPE)
L (17–21, 14–21)
 Rankireddy /
Shetty (IND)
L (17–21, 19–21)
4 N/A Did not advance
Chloe Birch
Lauren Smith
Women's doubles  Fukushima
/ Hirota (JPN)
L (13–21, 14–21)
 Polii /
Rahayu (INA)
L (11–21, 13–21)
 Chow M K /
Lee M Y (MAS)
L (19–21, 16–21)
4 N/A Did not advance
Marcus Ellis
Lauren Smith
Mixed doubles  Gicquel /
Delrue (FRA)
W (21–18, 21–17)
 Hurlburt-Yu /
Wu (CAN)
W (21–13, 21–19)
 Puavaranukroh /
Taerattanachai (THA)
W (21–12, 21–19)
1 Q N/A  Tse Y S /
Tang C M (HKG)
L (13–21, 18–21)
Did not advance

Boxing

Main articles: Boxing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Boxing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered eleven boxers (seven men and four women) to compete for each of the following weight classes into the Olympic tournament. Rio 2016 Olympian and 2018 Commonwealth Games champion Galal Yafai (men's flyweight) and 2019 world bronze medallist Peter McGrail (men's featherweight) were the first boxers to secure their spots on the British squad by winning the round of 16 match of their respective weight divisions at the 2020 European Qualification Tournament in London.[24][25] After being suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the qualifying tournament resumed in Villebon-sur-Yvette, France. Nine further boxers secured places in their respective weight divisions, including Rio 2016 Olympian Pat McCormack in the men's welterweight. The final total of eleven qualified boxers is the joint highest (with Uzbekistan and the ROC) of any nation at the 2020 Summer Olympics. On 23 June 2021, Team GB announced the names of the eleven boxers who would represent the team in Tokyo – each place went to the boxer who had obtained the quota place in qualification.[26]

Men
Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Galal Yafai Flyweight  Soghomonyan (ARM)
W RSC
 Chinyemba (ZAM)
W 3–2
 Veitia (CUB)
W 4–1
 Bibossinov (KAZ)
W 3–2
 Paalam (PHI)
W 4–1
1st place, gold medalist(s)
Peter McGrail Featherweight  Butdee (THA)
L 0–5
Did not advance 17
Luke McCormack Lightweight  Kaushik (IND)
W 4–1
 Cruz (CUB)
L 0–5
Did not advance 9
Pat McCormack Welterweight Bye  Radzionau (BLR)
W 5–0
 Baturov (UZB)
W 4–1
 Walsh (IRL)
W WO
 Iglesias (CUB)
L 0–5
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Benjamin Whittaker Light heavyweight  Vivas (COL)
W 4–1
 Oraby (EGY)
W 5–0
 Machado (BRA)
W 3–2
 Khataev (ROC)
W 4–1
 López (CUB)
L 1–4
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Cheavon Clarke Heavyweight Bye  Teixeira (BRA)
L 1–4
Did not advance 9
Frazer Clarke Super heavyweight Bye  Rogava (UKR)
W 4–1
 Aliev (FRA)
W DSQ
 Jalolov (UZB)
L RSC–I
Did not advance 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Charley Davison Flyweight  Cheddar (MAR)
W 5–0
 Chang Y (CHN)
L 0–5
Did not advance 9
Karriss Artingstall Featherweight  Kenosi (BOT)
W 5–0
 Romeu (BRA)
W 5–0
 Nicolson (AUS)
W 3–2
 Irie (JPN)
L 2–3
Did not advance 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Caroline Dubois Lightweight  Sadiku (KOS)
W 5–0
 Ellis (USA)
W 3–0
 Seesondee (THA)
L 2–3
Did not advance 5
Lauren Price Middleweight N/A  Mönkhbat (MGL)
W 5–0
 Bylon (PAN)
W 5–0
 Fontijn (NED)
W 3–2
 Li Q (CHN)
W 5–0
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Canoeing

Main articles: Canoeing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Canoeing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Slalom

British canoeists qualified boats in all four classes for the Games through the 2019 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships in La Seu d'Urgell, Spain.[27] On 10 October 2019, Team GB announced the names of the slalom canoeists selected for the Games, as a result of their performances at three selection meets: the British Senior and Olympic Trials, the 2019 ICF World Cup series in Lee Valley Park, and the World Championships.[28]

Athlete Event Preliminary Semifinal Final
Run 1 Rank Run 2 Rank Best Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Adam Burgess Men's C-1 99.82 4 99.64 2 99.64 3 Q 106.18 8 Q 103.86 4
Bradley Forbes-Cryans Men's K-1 93.65 5 101.46 21 93.65 13 Q 96.48 5 Q 100.58 6
Mallory Franklin Women's C-1 107.51 1 105.06 1 105.06 1 Q 117.75 6 Q 108.68 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Kimberley Woods Women's K-1 109.63 8 107.82 8 107.82 9 Q 109.00 6 Q 177.09 10

Sprint

Great Britain qualified a single boat in the men's K-1 200 m with a gold-medal victory at the 2019 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships in Szeged, Hungary.[29] On 10 October 2019, reigning Olympic champion Liam Heath headed the list of canoeists being selected for the Games.[28] Following the re-allocation of quota places gained at the World Championships and in subsequent competitions, Great Britain secured a place in the women's K-1 500 m.[30] On 30 June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of the remaining members of their sprint canoe squad for Tokyo.[31] On 8 July 2021, it was confirmed that Team GB had been reallocated a quota in the women's C-1 200 m and that Katie Reid would join the British canoe sprint squad in Tokyo.[32]

Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Liam Heath Men's K-1 200 m 34.582 3 QF 33.985 1 SF 35.108 2 FA 35.202 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Katie Reid Women's C-1 200 m 47.876 4 QF 47.821 4 Did not advance
Emily Lewis Women's K-1 200 m 42.038 4 QF 42.945 3 Did not advance
Women's K-1 500 m 1:55.743 7 QF 1:51.996 4 Did not advance
Deborah Kerr Women's K-1 200 m 41.168 3 QF 42.742 1 SF 39.751 2 FA 40.409 8
Women's K-1 500 m 1:51.375 5 QF 1:50.133 3 SF 1:55.955 7 Did not advance

Qualification Legend: FA = Qualify to final (medal); FB = Qualify to final B (non-medal)

Cycling

Main articles: Cycling at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Cycling at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

On 21 June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of their cycling squad for Tokyo. Notable inclusions were multiple gold medallists Geraint Thomas, Ed Clancy, and Jason and Laura Kenny.[33] For the fourth Olympics in a row, Great Britain topped the medal table in cycling.[34]

Road

Great Britain entered a squad of six riders (four men and two women) to compete in their respective Olympic road races, by virtue of their respective positions in the UCI World Ranking for nations as at 22 October 2019. Included were three Grand Tour winners, Geraint Thomas (2018 Tour de France), Simon Yates (2018 Vuelta a Espana) and Tao Geoghegan Hart (2020 Giro d'Italia). Former World Champion and London 2012 silver medallist Lizzie Deignan highlighted the women's team.[35]

Athlete Event Time Rank
Tao Geoghegan Hart Men's road race Did not finish
Geraint Thomas Did not finish
Adam Yates 6:06:33 9
Simon Yates 6:09:04 17
Tao Geoghegan Hart Men's time trial 1:01:44.81 29
Geraint Thomas 57:46.61 12
Women
Athlete Event Time Rank
Elizabeth Deignan Women's road race 3:54:31 11
Anna Shackley Women's road race Did not finish
Women's time trial 34:13.60 18

Track

Following the completion of the 2020 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, British riders accumulated spots in men's team sprint, men's and women's team pursuit, and men's and women's madison, as well as both the men's and women's omnium. As a result of their place in the men's team sprint, Great Britain won the right to enter two riders in both men's sprint and men's keirin.

Unable to earn a quota place in the women's team sprint, Great Britain won a single quota place in the women's individual sprint through the UCI Olympic rankings. Qualification for the individual sprint means a quota place is also gained in the women's keirin.

Great Britain's most successful male and female Olympians, Jason and Laura Kenny return, along with Ed Clancy. Both Jason Kenny (team sprint) and Clancy (team pursuit) are seeking to set a record for consecutive victories (four) in a single Olympic cycling event. Jason Kenny will also be seeking to gain the outright records for gold medals for a British Olympian, which he currently shares with Chris Hoy and most medals for any Olympic cyclist, currently held by Bradley Wiggins. Laura Kenny will seek to increase her lead as the British female Olympian with the most gold medals, and surpass Charlotte Dujardin as Britain's most decorated female Olympian, and Leontien Van Moorsel from the Netherlands as the most successful and most decorated Olympic female cyclist.

Sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Round 1 Repechage 1 Round 2 Repechage 2 Round 3 Repechage 3 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Jack Carlin Men's sprint 9.306
77.369
3 Q  Hart (AUS)
W 9.829
73.253
Bye  Sahrom (MAS)
W 9.884
72.845
Bye  Vigier (FRA)
W 9.963
72.267
Bye  Levy (GER)
W 9.680,
W 9.795
 Lavreysen (NED)
L, L
 Dmitriev (ROC)
W 9.786,
W 9.934
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Jason Kenny 9.510
75.710
8 Q  Awang (MAS)
W 9.791
73.537
Bye  Wakimoto (JPN)
W 9.916
72.610
Bye  Dmitriev (ROC)
L
 Awang (MAS)
 Wakimoto (JPN)
W 10.066
71.528
 Lavreysen (NED)
L, L
Did not advance 5th place final
 Levy (GER)
 Paul (TTO)
 Vigier (FRA)
L
8
Katy Marchant Women's sprint 10.495
68.604
8 Q  Kobayashi (JPN)
W 11.134
64.667
Bye  Lee W-s (HKG)
W 10.970
65.634
Bye  Genest (CAN)
W 10.935
65.844
Bye  Lee W-s (HKG)
L, L
Did not advance 5th place final
 Friedrich (GER)
 Braspennincx (NED)
 Genest (CAN)
L
6
Team sprint

With silver in the team sprint, Jason Kenny became Great Britain's outright most successful Olympian, cycling's most successful Olympian and the joint most decorated British and cycling Olympian with Bradley Wiggins.

Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Jack Carlin
Jason Kenny
Ryan Owens
Men's team sprint 42.231
63.934
2  Germany (GER)
W 41.829
64.549
2 FA  Netherlands (NED)
L 44.589
60.553
2nd place, silver medalist(s)

Qualification legend: FA=Gold medal final; FB=Bronze medal final * Philip Hindes travels as reserve.

Pursuit
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time Rank Opponent
Results
Rank Opponent
Results
Rank
Ed Clancy
Ethan Hayter
Ethan Vernon
Matthew Walls
Oliver Wood
Charlie Tanfield*
Men's team pursuit 3:47.507 4  Denmark (DEN)
4:28.489
8  Switzerland (SUI)
3:45.636
7
Katie Archibald
Elinor Barker
Neah Evans
Laura Kenny
Josie Knight
Women's team pursuit 4:09.022 2  United States (USA)
4:07.562
2  Germany (GER)
4:10.607
2nd place, silver medalist(s)

* Charlie Tanfield originally travelled as a reserve. Following the qualification ride of the men's team pursuit, Ed Clancy withdrew from the men's team, citing a back injury, and announced his immediate retirement. As a consequence, Tanfield was called into the main squad and rode the heat and placing final. In the former, he suffered a crash when clipped from behind by the Denmark team.

Keirin
Athlete Event Round 1 Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Rank Rank Rank Rank Rank
Jack Carlin Men's keirin 1 Q Bye 2 Q 4 FB 8
Jason Kenny 4 R 1 Q 2 Q 1 FA 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Katy Marchant Women's keirin REL 1 Q 5 Did not advance
Omnium
Athlete Event Scratch race Tempo race Elimination race Points race Total
Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Points Rank
Matthew Walls Men's omnium 1 40 3 36 2 38 2 39 153 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Laura Kenny Women's omnium DNF 16 1 40 13 16 1 24 96 6
Madison
Athlete Event Points Laps Rank
Ethan Hayter
Matthew Walls
Men's madison 40 0 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Katie Archibald
Laura Kenny
Women's madison 58 20 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Mountain biking

Great Britain entered single mountain bikers to compete in both the men's and women's cross-country races. The men's quota was gained by finishing in the top two eligible nations of the under-23 division at the 2019 UCI Mountain Bike World Championships in Mont-Sainte-Anne, Canada. The women's quota was secured by virtue of their position in the UCI World Ranking for nations as at 16 May 2021.

Tom Pidcock's preparations for the men's event were disrupted when he broke his collarbone after being hit by a car during training in May 2021. However, he recovered to be able to compete in the Games where we won Britain's first ever Olympic mountain biking medal, winning gold by a margin of 20 seconds over second placed Mathias Flückiger of Switzerland.[36]

Athlete Event Time Rank
Tom Pidcock Men's cross-country 1:25:14 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Evie Richards Women's cross-country 1:19:09 7

BMX

Great Britain received two quota spots (one per gender) for BMX racing at the Olympics. The men's place was secured as a result of the nation's seventh-place finish in the UCI Olympic Ranking List of 1 June 2021, while the women's was derived from Bethany Shriever's individual ranking.[37][38]

In BMX freestyle, two places (one per gender) were awarded to the British squad at the Olympics; both were secured as a result of the nation's top-five finish in the UCI Olympic Ranking List of 8 June 2021.

Race
Athlete Event Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Points Rank Points Rank Result Rank
Kye Whyte Men's race 9 2 Q 8 2 Q 39.167 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Bethany Shriever Women's race 5 1 Q 3 1 Q 44.358 1st place, gold medalist(s)

* Ross Cullen travels as reserve.

Freestyle
Athlete Event Seeding Final
Run 1 Run 2 Average Rank Run 1 Run 2 Rank
Declan Brooks Men's freestyle 74.30 79.20 76.75 7 89.40 90.80 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Charlotte Worthington Women's freestyle 81.80 81.20 81.50 4 38.60 97.50 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Diving

Main articles: Diving at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Diving at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British divers gained a full quota of 16 places for the following individual spots and synchronized teams at the Games through the 2019 FINA World Championships, the 2019 European Championships and the 2021 FINA Diving World Cup. The divers who secured the places for Great Britain were not necessarily the athletes who would be selected to represent their team in these events. Instead, they needed to compete at the Olympic trials to book their places for the Games. A team of 12 divers was announced on 2 June 2021, including defending champions Jack Laugher and Daniel Goodfellow in the men's synchronized springboard; and two-time world champion and multiple Olympic medallist Tom Daley.[39] James Heatly, Katherine Torrance and Matty Lee make Olympic debuts, having all won gold in the inaugural European Games in 2015 as juniors with the returning Lois Toulson, while Grace Reid will do so as a reigning Commonwealth Games champion. European bronze and silver medallist Andrea Spendolini-Sirieix, the youngest of the squad, debuts at 16 years old.

Laugher, Daley, Reid and Touslon will double up in individual and synchronised events, with their quota places released to be filled by next-in-line alternates.

Men
Athlete Event Preliminaries[40][41] Semifinals[42][43] Final[44][45][46][47]
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
James Heatly 3 m springboard 458.40 4 Q 454.85 4 Q 411.00 9
Jack Laugher 445.05 6 Q 514.75 3 Q 518.00 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Tom Daley 10 m platform 453.70 4 Q 462.90 4 Q 548.25 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Noah Williams 309.55 27 Did not advance
Daniel Goodfellow
Jack Laugher
3 m synchronized springboard N/A 382.80 7
Tom Daley
Matty Lee
10 m synchronized platform N/A 471.81 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Preliminaries[48][49] Semifinals[50] Final[51][52][53]
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Scarlett Mew Jensen 3 m springboard 243.45 22 Did not advance
Grace Reid 268.15 19 Did not advance
Andrea Spendolini-Sirieix 10 m platform 307.70 10 Q 314.00 8 Q 305.50 7
Lois Toulson 314.00 7 Q 311.10 9 Q 289.6 9
Grace Reid
Katherine Torrance
3 m synchronized springboard N/A 269.10 6
Eden Cheng
Lois Toulson
10 m synchronized platform N/A 289.26 7

Equestrian

Main articles: Equestrian at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Equestrian at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British equestrians qualified a full squad in the team dressage, eventing, and jumping competitions by virtue of a top-six finish at the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina, United States in dressage and eventing, and a top-three finish among eligible nations in the jumping competition at the 2019 FEI European Championships in Rotterdam, Netherlands.[54][55][56]

On 1 July 2021, Team GB announced the selection of their dressage and eventing teams for Tokyo. Included in the dressage team were triple gold medallist Charlotte Dujardin and Carl Hester who will be competing at his sixth Olympic Games.[57][58] The following day Team GB revealed the names of the three riders who will compete in the jumping events in Tokyo. The team included London 2012 gold medallists Scott Brash and Ben Maher.[59]

In the team dressage the British team of Dujardin, Hester and Charlotte Fry finished in the bronze medal position. This was Dujardin's fifth Olympic medal, tying her with rower Katherine Grainger and tennis player Kathleen McKane Godfree as the female British athletes with the most Olympic medals.[60] The following day in the individual dressage Dujardin, who was the two-time defending Olympic champion in the event, took another bronze medal, making her the first female British athlete to win six Olympic medals.[5]

Dressage

Athlete Horse Event Grand Prix Grand Prix Special Grand Prix Freestyle Overall
Score Rank Score Rank Technical Artistic Score Rank
Charlotte Dujardin Gio Individual 80.963 4 Q N/A 83.000 94.086 88.543 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Charlotte Fry Everdale 77.096 8 Q 75.714 85.514 80.614 13
Carl Hester En Vogue 75.124 13 q 77.750 85.886 81.818 8
Charlotte Dujardin
Charlotte Fry
Carl Hester
See above Team 7508.5 2 Q 7723.0 3 N/A 7723.0 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Travelling Reserve: Gareth Hughes (Sintano Van Hof Olympia)

Qualification Legend: Q = Qualified for the final; q = Qualified for the final as a lucky loser

Eventing

Athlete Horse Event Dressage Cross-country Jumping Total
Qualifier Final
Penalties Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Rank
Laura Collett London 52 Individual 25.80 6 0.00 25.80 3 4.00 29.80 5 Q 8.00 37.80 9 37.80 9
Tom McEwen Toledo de Kerser 28.90 12 0.00 28.90 6 0.00 28.90 3 Q 0.00 28.90 2 28.90 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Oliver Townend Ballaghmor Class 23.60 2 0.00 23.60 1 4.00 27.60 2 Q 4.80 32.40 5 32.40 5
Laura Collett
Tom McEwen
Oliver Townend
See above Team 78.30 1 0.00 78.30 1 8.00 86.30 1 N/A 86.30 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Travelling reserve: Rosalind Canter (Allstar B)

Jumping

Athlete Horse Event Qualification Final Jump-off
Penalties Rank Penalties Time Rank Penalties Time Rank
Scott Brash Hello Jefferson Individual 0 =1 Q 1 88.45 7 Did not advance
Harry Charles Romeo 88 0 =1 Q Retired Did not advance
Ben Maher Explosion W 0 =1 Q 0 85.67 =1 0 37.85 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Harry Charles
Ben Maher
Holly Smith
Romeo 88
Explosion W
Denver
Team 20 7 Q 24+WD 162.46 10 Did not advance

* Harry Charles was the travelling reserve and he was called on to substitute for Holly Smith in the individual event and for Scott Brash in the team competition following an injury to the latter's horse, Hello Jefferson.[61]

Fencing

Main article: Fencing at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain entered one fencer into the Olympic competition. 2019 world silver medallist Marcus Mepstead claimed a spot in the men's foil as one of the two highest-ranked fencers vying for qualification from Europe in the FIE Adjusted Official Rankings.[62]

Athlete Event Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Marcus Mepstead Men's foil Bye  Hamza (EGY)
L 13–15
Did not advance

Field hockey

Main article: Field hockey at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Great Britain men's Men's tournament  South Africa
W 3–1
 Canada
W 3–1
 Germany
L 1–5
 Netherlands
D 2–2
 Belgium
D 2–2
3 Q  India
L 1–3
Did not advance 5
Great Britain women's Women's tournament  Germany
L 1–2
 South Africa
W 4–1
 India
W 4–1
 Netherlands
L 0–1
 Ireland
W 2–0
3 Q  Spain
D 2–2 FT
(2–0 P)
 Netherlands
L 1–5
 India
W 4–3
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Men's tournament

Main articles: Field hockey at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament and Field hockey at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's qualification

Great Britain men's national field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by securing one of the seven team quotas available from the 2019 Men's FIH Olympic Qualifiers, defeating Malaysia 9–3 on aggregate in a two-match playoff in London.[63]

Squad

The squad was announced on 17 June 2021.[64]

Head coach: Danny Kerry[65]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) CapsClub
5 DF David Ames (1989-06-25)25 June 1989 (aged 32) 101 England Holcombe
6 MF Jacob Draper (1998-07-24)24 July 1998 (aged 23) 66 England Hampstead & Westminster
7 FW Alan Forsyth (1992-04-05)5 April 1992 (aged 29) 189 England Surbiton
8 FW Rupert Shipperley (1992-11-21)21 November 1992 (aged 28) 87 England Hampstead & Westminster
9 MF Harry Martin (1992-10-23)23 October 1992 (aged 28) 238 England Hampstead & Westminster
10 FW Chris Griffiths (1990-09-03)3 September 1990 (aged 30) 112 England Old Georgians
11 MF Ian Sloan (1993-11-19)19 November 1993 (aged 27) 112 England Wimbledon
13 FW Sam Ward (1990-12-24)24 December 1990 (aged 30) 135 England Old Georgians
15 FW Phil Roper (1992-01-24)24 January 1992 (aged 29) 155 England Wimbledon
16 MF Adam Dixon (Captain) (1986-09-11)11 September 1986 (aged 34) 284 England Beeston
18 DF Brendan Creed (1993-01-03)3 January 1993 (aged 28) 87 England Surbiton
20 GK Ollie Payne (1999-04-06)6 April 1999 (aged 22) 11 England Holcombe
21 FW Liam Ansell (1993-11-12)12 November 1993 (aged 27) 54 England Wimbledon
25 DF Jack Waller (1997-01-28)28 January 1997 (aged 24) 55 England Wimbledon
26 MF James Gall (1995-05-20)20 May 1995 (aged 26) 88 England Surbiton
27 DF Liam Sanford (1996-03-14)14 March 1996 (aged 25) 69 England Old Georgians
29 DF Tom Sorsby (1996-10-28)28 October 1996 (aged 24) 39 England Surbiton
32 FW Zach Wallace (1999-09-29)29 September 1999 (aged 21) 55 England Surbiton

Travelling reserves: Alan Forsyth and Harry Martin

Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Belgium 5 4 1 0 26 9 +17 13 Quarter-finals
2  Germany 5 3 0 2 19 10 +9 9
3  Great Britain 5 2 2 1 11 11 0 8
4  Netherlands 5 2 1 2 13 13 0 7
5  South Africa 5 1 1 3 16 24 −8 4
6  Canada 5 0 1 4 9 27 −18 1
Source: Tokyo 2020 and FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
24 July 2021 (2021-07-24)
18:30
v
Great Britain  3–1  South Africa
Ward Goal 2'
Ansell Goal 32'
Waller Goal 56'
Report Guise-Brown Goal 4'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Germán Montes de Oca (ARG)
Ben Goentgen (GER)

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
11:45
v
Great Britain  3–1  Canada
Ansell Goal 33'57'
Ward Goal 41'
Report Van Son Goal 51'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Lim Hong Zhen (SGP)
Marcin Grochal (POL)

27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
12:15
v
Germany  5–1  Great Britain
Fuchs Goal 15'51'60'
Rühr Goal 35'
Weigand Goal 42'
Report Roper Goal 8'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Simon Taylor (NZL)
Adam Kearns (AUS)

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
12:15
v
Netherlands  2–2  Great Britain
Brinkman Goal 22'
Janssen Goal 31'
Report Ward Goal 52'57'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Raghu Prasad (IND)
Germán Montes de Oca (ARG)

30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
21:15
v
Belgium  2–2  Great Britain
Boon Goal 36'
Briels Goal 43'
Report Shipperley Goal 17'
Ansell Goal 38'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Simon Taylor (NZL)
Francisco Vázquez (ESP)
Quarterfinal
1 August 2021 (2021-08-01)
21:00
v
India  3–1  Great Britain
Dilpreet Goal 7'
Gurjant Goal 16'
Hardik Goal 57'
Report Ward Goal 45'
Umpires:
Marcin Grochal (POL)
Simon Taylor (NZL)

Women's tournament

Main articles: Field hockey at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament and Field hockey at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's qualification

Great Britain women's national field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by securing one of the seven team quotas available from the 2019 Women's FIH Olympic Qualifiers, defeating Chile 5–1 on aggregate in a two-match playoff in London.[63] On 17 June, Great Britain Hockey announced the selection of the squad that would represent the team in Tokyo.[66]

Squad

The squad was announced on 17 June 2021.[67]

Head coach: Australia Mark Hager

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps GoalsClub
1 GK Maddie Hinch (1988-10-08)8 October 1988 (aged 32) 158 0 No club listed.
4 MF Laura Unsworth (1988-03-08)8 March 1988 (aged 33) 276 11 England East Grinstead
5 MF Sarah Evans (1991-04-12)12 April 1991 (aged 30) 122 9 England Surbiton
6 DF Anna Toman (1993-04-29)29 April 1993 (aged 28) 91 7 England Wimbledon
7 FW Hannah Martin (1994-12-30)30 December 1994 (aged 26) 77 15 England Hampstead & Westminster
8 MF Sarah Jones (1990-06-25)25 June 1990 (aged 31) 129 13 England Holcombe
9 MF Susannah Townsend (1989-07-28)28 July 1989 (aged 31) 180 13 England Canterbury
10 FW Sarah Robertson (1993-09-27)27 September 1993 (aged 27) 158 13 England Hampstead & Westminster
13 FW Elena Rayer (1996-11-22)22 November 1996 (aged 24) 58 3 England East Grinstead
16 FW Isabelle Petter (2000-06-27)27 June 2000 (aged 21) 33 6 England Loughborough Students
17 DF Leah Wilkinson (1986-12-03)3 December 1986 (aged 34) 182 23 England Holcombe
18 DF Giselle Ansley (1992-03-31)31 March 1992 (aged 29) 165 23 England Surbiton
20 DF Hollie Pearne-Webb (Captain) (1990-09-19)19 September 1990 (aged 30) 191 8 No club listed.
21 MF Fiona Crackles (2000-02-11)11 February 2000 (aged 21) 13 0 England Durham University
24 MF Shona McCallin (1992-05-18)18 May 1992 (aged 29) 93 3 No club listed.
26 FW Lily Owsley (1994-12-10)10 December 1994 (aged 26) 164 36 England Hampstead & Westminster
31 DF Grace Balsdon (1993-04-13)13 April 1993 (aged 28) 81 7 England Hampstead & Westminster
32 DF Amy Costello (1998-01-14)14 January 1998 (aged 23) 88 England East Grinstead
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Netherlands 5 5 0 0 18 2 +16 15 Quarterfinals
2  Germany 5 4 0 1 13 7 +6 12
3  Great Britain 5 3 0 2 11 5 +6 9
4  India 5 2 0 3 7 14 −7 6
5  Ireland 5 1 0 4 4 11 −7 3
6  South Africa 5 0 0 5 5 19 −14 0
Source: Tokyo 2020 and FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
25 July 2021 (2021-07-25)
09:30
v
Great Britain  1–2  Germany
Jones Goal 13' Report Huse Goal 24'
Stapenhorst Goal 33'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Liu Xiaoying (CHN)
Irene Presenqui (ARG)

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
18:30
v
South Africa  1–4  Great Britain
Walraven Goal 6' Report Rayer Goal 29'50'
Toman Goal 39'
Unsworth Goal 40'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Carolina de la Fuente (ARG)
Maggie Giddens (USA)

28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
10:00
v
Great Britain  4–1  India
Martin Goal 2'19'
Owsley Goal 41'
Balsdon Goal 57'
Report Sharmila Goal 23'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Laurine Delforge (BEL)
Aleisha Neumann (AUS)

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
19:00
v
Great Britain  0–1  Netherlands
Report Matla Goal 13'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Michelle Joubert (RSA)
Aleisha Neumann (AUS)

31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
20:45
v
Ireland  0–2  Great Britain
Report Townsend Goal 17'
Martin Goal 32'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Carolina de la Fuente (ARG)
Emi Yamada (JPN)
Quarterfinal
2 August 2021 (2021-08-02)
21:00
v
Spain  2–2  Great Britain
Iglesias Goal 20'
Bonastre Goal 51'
Report Martin Goal 17'
Balsdon Goal 37'
Penalties
Ycart Penalty shoot-out missed
García Grau Penalty shoot-out missed
Oliva Penalty shoot-out missed
Pérez Penalty shoot-out missed
0–2 Penalty shoot-out missed Toman
Penalty shoot-out scored Martin
Penalty shoot-out scored Jones
Umpires:
Aleisha Neumann (AUS)
Annelize Rostron (RSA)
Semifinal
4 August 2021 (2021-08-04)
10:30
v
Netherlands  5–1  Great Britain
Albers Goal 19'38'
Keetels Goal 18'
Verschoor Goal 32'
Matla Goal 49'
Report Ansley Goal 41'
Umpires:
Michelle Joubert (RSA)
Laurine Delforge (BEL)
Bronze medal game
6 August 2021 (2021-08-06)
10:30
v
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Great Britain  4–3  India
Rayer Goal 16'
Robertson Goal 24'
Pearne-Webb Goal 35'
Balsdon Goal 48'
Report Gurjit Goal 25'26'
Vandana Goal 29'
Umpires:
Michelle Joubert (RSA)
Michelle Meister (GER)

Football

Main article: Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Great Britain women Women's tournament  Chile
W 2–0
 Japan
W 1–0
 Canada
D 1–1
1 Q  Australia
L 3–4aet
F.T.: 2–2
Did not advance 5

Women's tournament

Main articles: Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament and Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's qualification

The FIFA Women's World Cup serves as the UEFA qualifying competition for the Olympic football tournament, with the top three sides qualifying. On 27 June 2019, England reached the semi-finals of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup; the following day, the United States were confirmed as their opponents. This made England one of the top three European sides in the competition, which, under an agreement between the FA and the other three home nations and FIFA, allowed Great Britain to take up the qualifying place for the 2020 Olympics won by England.[68]

Squad

The final squad of 22 athletes was originally announced on 27 May 2021.[69] Before the tournament, Carly Telford replaced the injured Karen Bardsley on 18 June 2021.[70]

Head coach: Norway Hege Riise

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Ellie Roebuck (1999-09-23)23 September 1999 (aged 21) 0 0 England Manchester City
2 2DF Lucy Bronze (1991-10-28)28 October 1991 (aged 29) 0 0 England Manchester City
3 2DF Demi Stokes (1991-12-12)12 December 1991 (aged 29) 0 0 England Manchester City
4 3MF Keira Walsh (1997-04-08)8 April 1997 (aged 24) 0 0 England Manchester City
5 2DF Steph Houghton (1988-04-23)23 April 1988 (aged 33) 5 3 England Manchester City
6 3MF Sophie Ingle (1991-09-02)2 September 1991 (aged 29) 0 0 England Chelsea
7 4FW Nikita Parris (1994-03-10)10 March 1994 (aged 27) 0 0 France Lyon
8 3MF Kim Little (1990-06-29)29 June 1990 (aged 31) 5 0 England Arsenal
9 4FW Ellen White (1989-05-09)9 May 1989 (aged 32) 4 0 England Manchester City
10 4FW Fran Kirby (1993-06-29)29 June 1993 (aged 28) 0 0 England Chelsea
11 3MF Caroline Weir (1995-06-20)20 June 1995 (aged 26) 0 0 England Manchester City
12 2DF Rachel Daly (1991-12-06)6 December 1991 (aged 29) 0 0 United States Houston Dash
13 1GK Carly Telford (1987-07-07)7 July 1987 (aged 34) 0 0 England Chelsea
14 2DF Millie Bright (1993-08-21)21 August 1993 (aged 27) 0 0 England Chelsea
15 4FW Lauren Hemp (2000-08-07)7 August 2000 (aged 20) 0 0 England Manchester City
16 2DF Leah Williamson (1997-03-29)29 March 1997 (aged 24) 0 0 England Arsenal
17 3MF Georgia Stanway (1999-01-03)3 January 1999 (aged 22) 0 0 England Manchester City
18 3MF Jill Scott (1987-02-02)2 February 1987 (aged 34) 5 1 England Everton
19 4FW Niamh Charles (1999-06-21)21 June 1999 (aged 22) 0 0 England Chelsea
20 4FW Ella Toone (1999-09-02)2 September 1999 (aged 21) 0 0 England Manchester United
21 2DF Lotte Wubben-Moy (1999-01-11)11 January 1999 (aged 22) 0 0 England Arsenal
22 1GK Sandy MacIver (1998-06-18)18 June 1998 (aged 23) 0 0 England Everton
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Great Britain 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 7 Advance to knockout stage
2  Canada 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
3  Japan (H) 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
4  Chile 3 0 0 3 1 5 −4 0
Source: TOCOG and FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host
Great Britain 2–0 Chile
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

Japan 0–1 Great Britain
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

Canada 1–1 Great Britain
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)
Quarter-finals
Great Britain 3–4 (a.e.t.) Australia
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

Golf

Main articles: Golf at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Golf at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered a total of two male and two female golfers into the Olympic tournament. Tyrrell Hatton and Paul Casey qualified directly among the top 60 eligible players for the men's event. However, Hatton announced his withdrawal on 21 June 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and he was replaced by Tommy Fleetwood.[72] Mel Reid and Jodi Ewart Shadoff qualified in a similar manner through the women's rankings. The latter following the withdrawal of higher-ranked British golfers Charley Hull and Georgia Hall. On 6 July 2021, Team GB confirmed the selection of the four golfers who will represent the team in Tokyo.[73]

Athlete Event Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Total
Score Score Score Score Score Par Rank
Paul Casey Men's 67 68 66 68 269 −15 T4
Tommy Fleetwood 70 69 64 70 273 −11 T16
Jodi Ewart Shadoff Women's 74 68 70 72 284 E T40
Mel Reid 73 75 76 68 292 +8 55

Gymnastics

Main articles: Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Artistic

Great Britain fielded a full squad of four gymnasts in the women's artistic gymnastics events by finishing fourth out of the nations eligible for qualification in the team all-around qualification round at the 2019 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships in Stuttgart, Germany. The top nine eligible nations were awarded qualification places.[74] The men's artistic gymnastics team also secured a place after finishing second among the nations eligible for qualification in the team all-around qualification round at the same championships. Again, nine team berths were available at this competition in total.[75] On 24 May 2021, Team GB announced the selection of the four members of the men's squad including reigning individual pommel horse and floor exercise champion Max Whitlock together with three debutants.[76] In June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of the four members of the women's team; all of them will make their Olympic debuts, including the twin sisters Jennifer and Jessica Gadirova.[77]

Men
Team
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
F PH R V PB HB F PH R V PB HB
Joe Fraser Team 14.066 14.666 14.400 13.833 15.400 Q 13.933 86.298 5 Q 13.866 14.666 14.500 14.133 14.666 14.333 N/A
James Hall 13.866 14.100 13.733 14.333 14.333 14.066 84.431 16 Q 14.033 14.000 13.600 14.233 13.100 14.200
Giarnni Regini-Moran 14.666 12.166 13.366 14.600 14.933 13.100 82.831 23 14.533 N/A 13.733 14.666 15.166 N/A
Max Whitlock N/A 14.900 Q N/A 14.100 13.400 N/A 14.966 N/A 13.366
Total 42.598 43.666 41.499 42.766 44.666 41.399 256.594 5 Q 42.432 43.632 41.833 43.032 42.932 41.899 255.760 4
Individual
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
F PH R V PB HB F PH R V PB HB
Joe Fraser All-around See team results 14.100 13.300 14.433 13.133 15.133 14.400 84.499 9
Parallel bars N/A 15.400 N/A 15.400 7 Q N/A 14.500 N/A 14.500 8
James Hall All-around See team results 14.466 13.433 13.966 14.300 14.433 14.000 84.598 8
Max Whitlock Pommel horse N/A 14.900 N/A 14.900 5 Q N/A 15.583 N/A 15.583 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Women
Team
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
V UB BB F V UB BB F
Jennifer Gadirova Team 14.533 13.066 13.300 13.800 Q* 54.699 17 Q 14.433 N/A 13.300 13.700 N/A
Jessica Gadirova 14.500 13.800 12.866 14.033 Q 55.199 12 Q 14.433 13.566 N/A 13.833
Alice Kinsella 14.166 12.633 12.100 12.766 51.665 48 14.266 14.166 13.333 12.800
Amelie Morgan 13.858 13.833 13.033 12.466 53.190 33 N/A 14.033 12.233 N/A
Total 43.199 40.699 39.199 40.599 163.396 6 Q 43.132 41.765 38.866 40.333 164.096 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Individual
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
V UB BB F V UB BB F
Jennifer Gadirova All-around See team results 13.800 12.400 12.933 13.800 53.533 13
Floor N/A 13.800 13.800 9 Q* N/A 13.233 13.233 7
Jessica Gadirova All-around See team results 14.566 13.666 12.033 13.700 53.965 10
Floor N/A 14.033 14.033 5 Q N/A 14.000 14.000 6

* Originally first reserve, Jennifer Gadirova was promoted to the floor final following the withdrawal of Simone Biles.

Trampoline

Great Britain qualified one gymnast for the women's trampoline by finishing in the top eight at the 2019 World Championships in Tokyo, Japan.[78][79] Great Britain secured a second quota when Rio silver medallist Bryony Page finished fourth in the 2020/21 Trampoline World Cup series. On 10 June 2021, Page and Laura Gallagher were selected to fill these quotas in Tokyo.[80]

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Score Rank Score Rank
Laura Gallagher Women's 53.335 15 Did not advance
Bryony Page 104.664 3 Q 55.735 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Judo

Main articles: Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics - Qualification

Great Britain, at the conclusion of the 2021 World Judo championships, had achieved quota places in the following weight categories. Nekoda Smythe-Davis had qualified a continental quota place in the −57 kg category, but had already withdrawn from Olympic consideration for health reasons. On 5 July 2021, Team GB announced the judokas who will compete in Tokyo, including debutant Sarah Adlington in the women's heavyweight category, who had been awarded a continental quota following the official withdrawal of Smythe-Davis.[81][82]

Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Ashley McKenzie Men's −60 kg  Huseynov (AZE)
L 00–01
Did not advance
Chelsie Giles Women's −52 kg  Rexhepi (MKD)
W 01–00
 Iraoui (MAR)
W 01–00
 Abe (JPN)
L 00–01
N/A  van Snick (BEL)
W 10–00
 Kocher (SUI)
W 10–00
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Lucy Renshall Women's −63 kg  Tashiro (JPN)
L 00–01
Did not advance
Gemma Howell Women's −70 kg  Pérez (PUR)
L 00–10
Did not advance
Natalie Powell Women's −78 kg Bye  Yoon H-j (KOR)
L 00–11
Did not advance
Sarah Adlington Women's +78 kg  Chikhrouhou (TUN)
L 00–10
Did not advance

Modern pentathlon

Main articles: Modern pentathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Modern pentathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British athletes qualified for the following spots in the modern pentathlon at the Games. Rio 2016 Olympian Joe Choong secured an outright berth in the men's event by winning the gold medal at the 2019 UIPM World Cup Final in Tokyo, Japan, becoming the first athlete to be named to Team GB for Tokyo 2020.[83] World champion Jamie Cooke and fellow Briton Kate French confirmed places in their respective events with a podium finish (gold for Cooke and silver for French) at the 2019 European Championships in Bath. Following the conclusion of the 2021 UIPM Worlds, a second and final women's quota place was confirmed based on the world rankings.[84] On 24 June 2021, Team GB announced the names of the four modern pentathletes chosen to compete in Tokyo.[85]

Athlete Event Fencing

(épée one touch)

Swimming

(200 m freestyle)

Riding

(show jumping)

Combined: shooting/running

(10 m air pistol)/(3200 m)

Total
RR BR Rank MP points Time Rank MP points Penalties Rank MP points Time Rank MP Points MP Points Rank
Joe Choong Men's 25–10 2 1 252 1:54.87 3 321 14 14 286 11:17.53 15 623 1482 OR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Jamie Cooke 18–17 0 16 208 1:53.80 2 323 7 8 293 11:12.30 14 628 1452 9
Kate French Women's 20–15 1 7 221 2:10.18 8 290 6 4 294 12:00.34 5 580 1385 OR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Jo Muir 13–22 1 33 179 2:14.52 15 281 7 7 293 12:15.13 9 565 1318 14

Rowing

Main articles: Rowing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Rowing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain qualified ten out of fourteen boats for each of the following rowing classes into the Olympic regatta, with all of the crews confirming Olympic places for their boats at the 2019 FISA World Championships in Ottensheim, Austria.[86][87][88] On 9 June 2021, Team GB announced the names of the 41 rowers who would represent them in Tokyo. Notable rowers in the squad included double Olympic champion Helen Glover and two-time medallist Moe Sbihi. In addition, four travelling reserves were named: Morgan Bolding, Matthew Tarrant, Madeleine Arlett and Saskia Budgett.[89]

Men
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
John Collins
Graeme Thomas
Double sculls 6:12.80 2 SA/B Bye 6:22.95 2 FA 6:06.46 4
Sholto Carnegie
Oliver Cook
Rory Gibbs
Matthew Rossiter
Four 5:55.36 1 FA Bye N/A 5:45.78 4
Tom Barras
Jack Beaumont
Angus Groom
Harry Leask
Quadruple sculls 5:42.01 3 R 5:55.91 1 FA N/A 5:33.75 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Josh Bugajski
Jacob Dawson
Charles Elwes
Thomas Ford
Thomas George
James Rudkin
Moe Sbihi
Oliver Wynne-Griffith
Henry Fieldman (cox)
Eight 5:34.40 3 R 5:23.32 2 FA N/A 5:25.73 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Victoria Thornley Single sculls 7:44.30 1 QF Bye 7:59.93 3 SA/B 7:25.12 2 FA 7:20.39 4
Helen Glover
Polly Swann
Pair 7:23.98 3 SA/B Bye N/A 6:49.39 2 FA 6:54.96 4
Emily Craig
Imogen Grant
Lightweight double sculls 7:03.29 2 SA/B Bye N/A 6:41.99 1 FA 6:48.04 4
Karen Bennett
Rowan McKellar
Rebecca Shorten
Harriet Taylor
Four 6:41.02 4 R 6:46.20 1 FA N/A 6:21.52 4
Lucy Glover
Charlotte Hodgkins-Byrne
Mathilda Hodgkins-Byrne
Hannah Scott
Quadruple sculls 6:20.80 3 R 6:42.97 4 FB N/A 6:25.14 7
Chloe Brew
Katherine Douglas
Rebecca Edwards
Emily Ford
Fiona Gammond
Caragh McMurtry
Rebecca Muzerie
Sara Parfett
Matilda Horn (cox)
Eight 6:26.75 4 R 6:05.26 5 N/A Did not advance

Qualification Legend: FA=Final A (medal); FB=Final B (non-medal); FC=Final C (non-medal); FD=Final D (non-medal); FE=Final E (non-medal); FF=Final F (non-medal); SA/B=Semifinals A/B; SC/D=Semifinals C/D; SE/F=Semifinals E/F; QF=Quarterfinals; R=Repechage

Rugby sevens

Main article: Rugby sevens at the 2020 Summer Olympics

In international competition the constituent nations of Great Britain ordinarily compete as separate unions representing England, Scotland and Wales. Northern Irish players who normally represent Ireland would have been eligible however the IRFU insisted that they do not play for Great Britain.

For the purposes of qualification for the 2020 Olympics the three British unions agreed in advance of the 2017–18 men's and women's Sevens World Series that their highest-finishing teams in that season would represent all three unions in the first stage of qualification during the 2018–19 series. The England men's and women's teams earned the right to represent the British unions in that stage of their respective competitions, but failed to qualify for the Olympic events through a top four finish.

As a result, England took part in the Rugby Europe Olympic qualification events for both men and women.

Summary
Team Event Pool Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Great Britain (men) Men's tournament  Canada
W 24–0
 Japan
W 34–0
 Fiji
L 7–33
2 Q  United States
W 26–21
 New Zealand
L 7–29
 Argentina
L 12–17
4
Great Britain (women) Women's tournament ROC
W 14–12
 New Zealand
L 21–26
 Kenya
W 31–0
2 Q  United States
W 21–12
 France
L 19–26
 Fiji
L 12–21
4

Men's tournament

Main article: Rugby sevens at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament

The England men's team secured a qualifying berth for Great Britain at the Olympics by winning the 2019 Rugby Europe Sevens Olympic Qualifying Tournament, defeating France in the final. The British Olympic Association will select a team of twelve from the three home nations to represent Great Britain at the Games.

Squad

Great Britain's 12-man squad plus one alternate was named on 6 July 2021.[90]

Head coach: Simon Amor

No. Pos. Player Country Date of birth (age) Events Points
1 BK Max McFarland  Scotland (1993-07-13)13 July 1993 (aged 28) 26 360
2 FW Ben Harris  England (1999-09-08)8 September 1999 (aged 21) 9 70
3 FW Alex Davis  England (1992-10-03)3 October 1992 (aged 28) 24 172
4 BK Dan Norton  England (1988-03-22)22 March 1988 (aged 33) 90 1,784
5 FW Ross McCann  Scotland (1997-10-30)30 October 1997 (aged 23) 16 44
6 BK Tom Mitchell (c)  England (1989-07-22)22 July 1989 (aged 32) 63 1,593
7 BK Dan Bibby  England (1991-02-06)6 February 1991 (aged 30) 54 704
8 FW Alec Coombes  Scotland (1995-11-26)26 November 1995 (aged 25) 16 85
9 BK Ollie Lindsay-Hague  England (1990-10-08)8 October 1990 (aged 30) 40 385
10 BK Robbie Fergusson  Scotland (1993-08-30)30 August 1993 (aged 27) 25 347
11 FW Ethan Waddleton  England (1996-11-23)23 November 1996 (aged 24) 29 40
12 BK Harry Glover  England (1995-12-31)31 December 1995 (aged 25) 20 95
13 BK Tom Bowen  England (1993-01-31)31 January 1993 (aged 28) 49 465
Group B
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts Qualification
1  Fiji 3 3 0 0 85 40 +45 9 Quarter-finals
2  Great Britain 3 2 0 1 65 33 +32 7
3  Canada 3 1 0 2 50 64 −14 5
4  Japan (H) 3 0 0 3 31 94 −63 3
Source: Tokyo 2020 and World Rugby
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head result; 3) Point difference; 4) Points scored.
(H) Host
26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
9:30
Great Britain  24–0  Canada
Try: Norton (2) 7' c, 8' m
McCann 11' c
Fergusson 7' m
Con: Bibby (2/3) 7', 12'
Fergusson (0/1)
(Tokyo 2020)

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
16:30
Great Britain  34–0  Japan
Try: Bibby 1' m
Mitchell 2' m
Glover 7' c
Harris 8' m
Waddleton 9' m
Davis 12' c
Con: Bibby (2/6) 7', 12'
(Tokyo 2020)
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Paulo Duarte (Portugal)

27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
9:30
Fiji  33–7  Great Britain
Try: Tuivuaka (2) 2' m, 8' c
Maqala 3' c
Wainiqolo 7' c
Tuimaba 14' c
Con: Bolaca (3/4) 4', 7', 8'
Nasoko (1/1) 14'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Harris 10' c
Con: Bibby (1/1) 10'
Quarter-final
27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
18:00
Great Britain  26–21  United States
Try: Lindsay-Hague 6' c
Harris 8' c
Davis 10' c
Norton 11' m
Con: Bibby (3/4) 7', 8', 10'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Barrett 1' c
Baker (2) 3' c, 4' c
Con: Hughes (3/3) 1', 3', 4'
Semi-final
28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
11:00
New Zealand  29–7  Great Britain
Try: Curry (2) 2' c, 13' m
Ware (2) 7' c, 9' m
Collier 10' m
Con: Knewstubb (2/4) 2', 7'
McGarvey-Black (0/1)
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Norton 3' c
Con: Bibby (1/1) 3'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Damon Murphy (Australia)
Bronze medal match
28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
17:30
Great Britain  12–17  Argentina
Try: Harris 1' m
Lindsay-Hague 10' c
Con: Bibby (1/2) 11'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Bazan Velez 5' m
Moneta 6' c
Mendy 12' m
Con: Mare (1/3) 7'

Women's tournament

Main article: Rugby sevens at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament

The England women's team secured a qualifying berth for Great Britain at the Olympics by winning the 2019 Rugby Europe Women's Sevens Olympic Qualifying Tournament, defeating Russia in the final. The British Olympic Association will select a team of twelve from the three home nations to represent Great Britain at the Games.

Squad
No. Pos. Player Country Date of birth (age)
1 BK Holly Aitchison  England (1997-02-21)21 February 1997 (aged 24)
2 BK Abbie Brown (cc)  England (1996-04-10)10 April 1996 (aged 25)
3 FW Abi Burton  England (2000-03-09)9 March 2000 (aged 21)
4 BK Deborah Fleming  England (1991-06-10)10 June 1991 (aged 30)
5 BK Natasha Hunt  England (1989-03-21)21 March 1989 (aged 32)
6 FW Megan Jones (cc)  England (1996-10-23)23 October 1996 (aged 24)
7 BK Jasmine Joyce  Wales (1995-10-08)8 October 1995 (aged 25)
8 FW Alex Matthews  England (1993-08-03)3 August 1993 (aged 27)
9 FW Celia Quansah  England (1996-10-25)25 October 1996 (aged 24)
10 BK Helena Rowland  England (1999-09-19)19 September 1999 (aged 21)
11 BK Hannah Smith  Scotland (1995-03-25)25 March 1995 (aged 26)
12 BK Lisa Thomson  Scotland (1997-09-07)7 September 1997 (aged 23)
13 BK Emma Uren  England (1997-10-01)1 October 1997 (aged 23)

[91]

Group A
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts Qualification
1  New Zealand 3 3 0 0 88 28 +60 9 Quarter-finals
2  Great Britain 3 2 0 1 66 38 +28 7
3 ROC 3 1 0 2 47 59 −12 5
4  Kenya 3 0 0 3 19 95 −76 3
Source: Tokyo 2020 and World Rugby
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head result; 3) Point difference; 4) Points scored.
29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
11:00
ROC  12–14  Great Britain
Try: Khamidova 1' m
Seredina 12' c
Con: Seredina (1/2) 13'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Brown (2) 4' c, 14' +1 c
Con: Aitchison (2/2) 4', 14' +1

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
18:30
New Zealand  26–21  Great Britain
Try: Blyde (3) 5' c, 7' m, 13' c
Nathan-Wong 9' c
Con: Nathan-Wong (3/4) 6', 9', 14'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Rowland 1' c
Jones 2' c
Joyce 4' c
Con: Aitchison (3/3) 1', 3', 4'

30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
11:00
Great Britain  31–0  Kenya
Try: Joyce (2) 1' c, 6' m
Burton 3' m
Jones 9' c
Thomson 14' c
Con: Hunt (1/3) 2'
Rowland (1/1) 9'
Aitchison (1/1) 14'
(Tokyo 2020)
Quarterfinal
30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
19:00[note 1]
United States  12–21  Great Britain
Try: Kirshe 11' m
Tapper 14' c
Con: Heavirland (1/2) 14'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Joyce (2) 1' c, 8' c
Brown 2' c
Con: Aitchison (3/3) 1', 2', 8'


Semifinals
31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
11:30
Great Britain  19–26  France
Try: Joyce (2) 5' c, 7' m
Smith 11' c
Con: Aitchison (1/1) 6'
Hunt (1/1) 11'
(Tokyo 2020) Try: Ciofani (2) 1' c, 8' m
Okemba 3' c
Bertrand 7' c
Con: Drouin (2/3) 2', 3'
Ulutule (1/1) 7', 9'


  1. ^ Matches were delayed by 30 minutes due to lightning in the area

Sailing

Main articles: Sailing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Sailing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British sailors qualified boats in all Olympic classes at the 2018 Sailing World Championships, bringing the maximum quota of 15 sailors, in ten boats.[92][93] On 1 October 2019, Team GB announced the names of the first twelve sailors selected for the Tokyo 2020 regatta, including Saskia Tidey, who previously competed for Ireland in Rio 2016, defending champions Giles Scott (Finn) and Hannah Mills (women's 470), and London 2012 silver medallists Luke Patience (men's 470) and Stuart Bithell (49er).[94] The Nacra 17 crew (Gimson & Burnet) was added to the list of confirmed athletes for Tokyo on 24 January 2020.[95] Laser sailor Elliot Hanson completed Team GB's sailing lineup for the Olympics on 29 February 2020.[96]

Men
Athlete Event Race[97][98][99][100][101] Net points Rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Tom Squires RS:X 9 13 14 2 10 3 4 1 8 2 6 10 14 82 7
Elliot Hanson Laser 5 12 17 10 3 28 7 20 2 DSQ N/A EL 104 12
Giles Scott Finn 9 9 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 7 N/A 8 36 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Chris Grube
Luke Patience
470 3 8 2 4 10 5 9 6 7 10 N/A 16 70 5
Stuart Bithell
Dylan Fletcher
49er 2 8 4 1 12 2 2 16 3 9 6 7 2 58 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Race[102][103][104] Net points Rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Emma Wilson RS:X 5 2 6 1 4 2 1 1 UFD 6 1 5 4 38 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Alison Young Laser Radial 24 8 9 20 12 12 10 8 14 27 N/A 16 133 10
Eilidh McIntyre
Hannah Mills
470 4 3 7 1 3 3 1 3 9 3 N/A 10 38 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Charlotte Dobson
Saskia Tidey
49erFX 1 1 6 4 2 5 16 13 14 15 4 18 14 95 6
Mixed
Athlete Event Race[105] Net points Rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
John Gimson
Anna Burnet
Nacra 17 7 5 2 1 1 2 5 10 1 5 2 4 10 45 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

M = Medal race; DSQ = Disqualification; EL = Eliminated – did not advance into the medal race; UFD = "U" Flag disqualification

Shooting

Main articles: Shooting at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Shooting at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British shooters achieved quota places for the following events by virtue of their best finishes at the 2018 ISSF World Championships, the 2019 ISSF World Cup series, European Championships or Games, and European Qualifying Tournament, as long as they obtained a minimum qualifying score (MQS) by 31 May 2020.[106] On 13 January 2021, Team GB announced the selection of four athletes to fill the quotas secured by the team to date.[107] Amber Hill secured a quota in the women's skeet after finishing at the top of the qualifying rankings for that event by winning the ISSF World Cup in New Delhi on 21 March 2021.[108] On 27 May 2021, Hill secured a quota for Team GB by winning the bronze medal at the 2021 European Shooting Championships in Osijek, Croatia, superseding the earlier quota she had won and releasing it to a shooter from another NOC.[109] On 15 June 2021, Team GB confirmed that Hill had been selected for Tokyo.[110] On 21 July, the British Olympic Association confirmed that Hill, having failed a COVID-19 test before flying to Tokyo, had been forced to withdraw from the Games.[111]

Matthew Coward-Holley, won Britain's first shooting medal of the Games, a bronze in the men's trap. The reigning European and World champion, who had twice broken his back playing rugby as a teenager,[112] missed his first three targets but then hit 14 in a row to secure the bronze medal.[113]

Athlete Event Qualification 1 Qualification 2 Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Matthew Coward-Holley Men's trap 123 (+21) 2 Q N/A 33 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Aaron Heading 119 23 Did not advance
Kirsty Hegarty Women's trap 116 16 Did not advance
Amber Hill Women's skeet DNS Did not advance
Seonaid McIntosh Women's 10 m air rifle 627.2 12 Did not advance
Women's 50 m rifle 3 positions 1167 14 Did not advance
Matthew Coward-Holley
Kirsty Hegarty
Mixed trap team 143 10 Did not advance

Skateboarding

Main articles: Skateboarding at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Skateboarding at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered two skateboarders to compete across all events at the Games. Sky Brown and Bombette Martin qualified among the top 16 eligible skateboarders in the women's park, respectively, based on the World Skate Olympic Rankings of 30 June 2021. On 1 July 2021, Team GB announced the selection of both athletes to represent the team in Tokyo.[114]

Athlete Event Heat Final
Score Rank Score Rank
Sky Brown Women's park 57.40 2 Q 56.47 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Bombette Martin 16.21 18 Did not advance

Sport climbing

Main articles: Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered one sport climber into the Olympic tournament. Shauna Coxsey qualified directly for the women's combined event, by advancing to the final stage and securing one of the seven provisional berths at the 2019 IFSC World Championships in Hachioji, Japan.[115][116] On 11 February 2020, Team GB confirmed Coxsey's selection for Tokyo.[117]

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Speed Boulder Lead Total Rank Speed Boulder Lead Total Rank
Best Place Result Place Hold Time Place Best Place Result Place Hold Time Place
Shauna Coxsey Women's 9.65 16 2T4z 3 4 4 21+ 2:23 13 832.00 10 Did not advance

Swimming

Main articles: Swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Swimming at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

British swimmers must qualify by finishing in the top two of the Olympic trials, gaining the GB qualifying A standard set by British Swimming in the relevant final (that time being the fastest time of the sixteenth fastest swimmer internationally in that event in 2019). The standard is typically well in advance of the qualification time set by the international federation FINA; therefore, the number and identity of swimmers who will represent Great Britain will not be known until the period concludes. British Swimming have set a maximum of 35 swimmers for the team, although one swimmer may swim in multiple events.

All selected British swimmers must further achieve the qualifying standards in the events (up to a maximum of 2 swimmers in each event at the Olympic Qualifying Time (OQT), and potentially 1 at the Olympic Selection Time (OST)):[118][119]

Great Britain may also enter a team for relay events with a top 12 finish at the 2019 FINA World Championships, or having one of the four best times of a team outside that top 12 in a relay event. At the 2019 Championships, Great Britain secured 5 top 12 finishes out of 7 relay events, including the full set of male and mixed relay events, thus confirming Great Britain's first guaranteed places in the pool for Tokyo 2020.

On 20 January 2021, British Swimming announced that following a change of selection policy to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, four male swimmers who won individual medals at the 2019 World Aquatics Championships would be pre-selected for their respective events, including the current Olympic champion and world record holder Adam Peaty in the men's 100 m breaststroke.[120]

On 17 April 2021, Team GB and British Swimming announced a further 24 swimmers would join the team, consisting of all the swimmers who had met the Olympic Consideration Time in any event at the National Trials, plus two further swimmers who had met the consideration time in the men's 200 metre freestyle, and were thus considered for the men's 4 × 200 metre freestyle relay squad. Following the 2021 European Aquatics Championships.[121] and Glasgow Open Swimming Meet, two further swimmers, Lucy Hope and Laura Stephens, were added to the final squad of thirty.[122] Due to possible scheduling conflicts, Great Britain returned a quota place in the Women's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay, which was then reallocated to Brazil.

In June 2021, Hector Pardoe and Alice Dearing won quotas in the men's and women's 10 km marathon by virtue of finishing first and fourth respectively in the final qualifying event in Setúbal, Portugal.[123][124] On 25 June, Team GB confirmed their selection for Tokyo. Dearing becomes the first black female swimmer to compete for Team GB at the Olympics.[125]

During the competition Adam Peaty won Team GB's first gold medal of the Games and became the first British swimmer to successfully defend an Olympic title, winning the men's 100 m breaststroke.[126] In the men's 200 m freestyle Tom Dean won the gold medal with teammate Duncan Scott taking silver, the first time since 1908 that two male British swimmers had won medals in the same event.[127] Dean then won a second gold medal, alongside Scott, James Guy and Matt Richards as Great Britain won the 4 × 200 m freestyle relay.[128][129]

Men
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ben Proud 50 m freestyle 21.93 13 Q 21.67 =5 Q 21.72 =5
Matt Richards 100 m freestyle DNS Did not advance
Jacob Whittle 48.44 16 Q 48.11 13 Did not advance
Tom Dean 200 m freestyle 1:45.24 3 Q 1:45.34 4 Q 1:44.22 NR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Duncan Scott 1:45.37 5 Q 1:44.60 1 Q 1:44.26 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Kieran Bird 400 m freestyle 3:48.55 20 N/A Did not advance
800 m freestyle 7:57.53 25 N/A Did not advance
Daniel Jervis 1500 m freestyle 14:50.22 5 Q N/A 14:55.48 5
Luke Greenbank 100 m backstroke 53.79 17 Did not advance
Luke Greenbank 200 m backstroke 1:54.63 1 Q 1:54.98 2 Q 1:54.72 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Brodie Williams 1:57.48 12 Q 1:57.73 15 Did not advance
Adam Peaty 100 m breaststroke 57.56 1 Q 57.63 1 Q 57.37 1st place, gold medalist(s)
James Wilby 58.99 6 Q 59.00 6 Q 58.96 5
Ross Murdoch 200 m breaststroke 2:09.95 16 Q 2:09.97 =12 Did not advance
James Wilby 2:09.70 15 Q 2:07.91 2 Q 2:08.19 6
James Guy 100 m butterfly DNS Did not advance
Jacob Peters 52.07 =24 Did not advance
Joe Litchfield 200 m individual medley 2:00.11 34 Did not advance
Duncan Scott 1:57.39 =5 Q 1:56.69 2 Q 1:55.28 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Max Litchfield 400 m individual medley 4:10.20 8 Q N/A 4:10.58 =4
Brodie Williams 4:17.27 21 N/A Did not advance
James Guy
Matt Richards
Joe Litchfield
Jacob Whittle
4 × 100 m freestyle relay 3:13.17 9 N/A Did not advance
Tom Dean
James Guy
Calum Jarvis[b]
Matt Richards
Duncan Scott
4 × 200 m freestyle relay 7:03.25 1 Q N/A 6:58.58 ER 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Luke Greenbank
James Guy
Duncan Scott
Adam Peaty
James Wilby[b]
4 × 100 m medley relay 3:37.43 2 Q N/A 3:27.51 ER 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Hector Pardoe 10 km open water N/A DNF
Women
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Anna Hopkin 50 m freestyle DNS Did not advance
Freya Anderson 100 m freestyle 53.61 14 Q 53.53 11 Did not advance
Anna Hopkin 52.75 3 Q 53.11 8 Q 52.83 7
Freya Anderson 200 m freestyle 1:56.96 11 Q 1:57.10 12 Did not advance
Kathleen Dawson 100 m backstroke 58.69 4 Q 58.56 5 Q 58.70 6
Cassie Wild 59.99 14 Q 1:00.20 =14 Did not advance
Cassie Wild 200 m backstroke 2:12.93 21 Did not advance
Sarah Vasey 100 m breaststroke 1:06.61 11 Q 1:06.87 11 Did not advance
Molly Renshaw 200 m breaststroke 2:22.99 6 Q 2:22.70 7 Q 2:22.65 6
Abbie Wood 2:24.13 15 Q 2:22.35 6 Q 2:23.72 7
Harriet Jones 100 m butterfly 58:73 21 Did not advance
Laura Stephens 200 m butterfly 2:09.00 7 Q 2:09.49 10 Did not advance
Alys Thomas 2:09.06 8 Q 2:09.07 8 Q 2:07.90 7
Alicia Wilson 200 m individual medley 2:10.39 9 Q 2:10.59 8 Q 2:12.86 8
Abbie Wood 2:09.94 3 Q 2:09.56 2 Q 2:09.15 4
Aimee Willmott 400 m individual medley 4:35.28 2 Q N/A 4:38.30 7
Freya Anderson
Lucy Hope
Anna Hopkin
Abbie Wood
4 × 100 m freestyle relay 3:34.03 NR 4 Q N/A 3:33.96 NR 5
Freya Anderson
Harriet Jones
Sarah Vasey
Cassie Wild
4 × 100 m medley relay 3:58.12 9 N/A Did not advance
Alice Dearing 10 km open water N/A 2:05:03.2 19
Mixed
Athlete Event Heat Final
Time Rank Time Rank
Freya Anderson[b]
Kathleen Dawson
James Guy
Anna Hopkin
Adam Peaty
4 × 100 m medley relay 3:38.75 OR 1 Q 3:37.58 WR 1st place, gold medalist(s)

b Swimmers who participated in the heats only.

Table tennis

Main articles: Table tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Table tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain entered three athletes into the table tennis competition at the Games. Two-time Olympian Liam Pitchford and double Commonwealth Games medallist Tin-Tin Ho were automatically selected among the top ten table tennis players vying for qualification in their respective singles events based on the ITTF Olympic Rankings of 1 June 2021. Ho becomes the first British female table tennis player to compete at the Games since 1996.[130][131] On 7 July 2021, Paul Drinkhall was granted a reallocated quota for the men's singles.[132]

Athlete Event Preliminary Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Liam Pitchford Men's singles Bye  Jorgić (SLO)
L 2–4
Did not advance
Paul Drinkhall Bye  Alamian (IRI)
W 4–1
 Gardos (AUT)
W 4–1
 Jang W-j (KOR)
L 1–4
Did not advance
Tin-Tin Ho Women's singles Bye  Batra (IND)
L 1–4
Did not advance

Taekwondo

Main articles: Taekwondo at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Taekwondo at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain will enter a squad of five athletes into the taekwondo competition for the first time at the Games. Two-time defending Olympic champion Jade Jones (women's 57 kg), 2019 world champions Bradly Sinden (men's 68 kg) and Bianca Walkden (women's +67 kg), and former European and world junior champion Lauren Williams (women's 67 kg) qualified directly for their respective weight classes by finishing among the top five taekwondo practitioners in the WT Olympic Rankings at the end of the qualification period. With the 2019 World Taekwondo Grand Slam winner already qualified through the rankings, 2019 world silver medallist and Grand Slam Series runner-up Mahama Cho (men's +80 kg) secured a fifth and final spot for Great Britain, as the next highest-placed eligible taekwondo practitioner. As Great Britain have achieved two quota places or more in each sex, they will not be eligible for any further places through remaining continental or global qualification routes.[133] On 1 June 2021, Team GB confirmed the selection of the five athletes who had secured qualification for Tokyo.[134]

Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Bradly Sinden Men's −68 kg Bye  Burns (NZL)
W 53–8 PTG
 Reçber (TUR)
W 39–19
 Zhao S (CHN)
W 33–25
Bye  Rashitov (UZB)
L 29–34
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Mahama Cho Men's +80 kg N/A  Sun Hy (CHN)
L 4–7 GP
Did not advance
Jade Jones Women's −57 kg Bye  Alizadeh (EOR)
L 12–16
Did not advance
Lauren Williams Women's −67 kg N/A  Paseka (TGA)
W RSC
 Wahba (EGY)
W 15–12
 Gbagbi (CIV)
W 24–18
Bye  Jelić (CRO)
L 22–25
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Bianca Walkden Women's +67 kg N/A Bye  Deniz (KAZ)
W 17–7
 Lee D-b (KOR)
L 24–25
Bye  Kowalczuk (POL)
W 7–3
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Tennis

Main articles: Tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Tennis at the 2020 Summer Olympics - Qualification

On 24 June 2021, Team GB announced the selection of the six players who will represent the team in Tokyo. The most notable selection was that of defending singles champion and double gold medallist Andy Murray. In addition to these players Cameron Norrie also qualified through the rankings but declined the opportunity to attend the Games due to other professional commitments, while Kyle Edmund was recovering from surgery.[135] Mixed doubles pairings are decided on rankings only when all players have been chosen, but Team GB are expected to be able to select a mixed doubles pair based on rankings.

On 13 July, Johanna Konta was forced to withdraw from the squad as a result of being diagnosed with SARS‑CoV‑2. This left Heather Watson as the only female player in the squad, and meant that, in the absence of a potential replacement (no British woman being ranked high enough to qualify), there would be no entry in the Women's Doubles tournament.[136] On 14 July, Dan Evans withdrew from both men's singles and men's doubles due to a positive COVID-19 test.[137] The following day it was announced that Jamie Murray would replace Evans as Neal Skupski's partner in the men's doubles.[138] After further withdrawals from the men's singles event Liam Broady secured a place in the tournament based on his world ranking.[139] On 25 July, Andy Murray withdrew from the men's singles due to a thigh strain and was replaced in the draw by Australian Max Purcell; Murray decided to continue his participation in the doubles.[140]

Athlete Event Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Liam Broady Men's singles  Cerúndolo (ARG)
W 7–5, 6–7(4–7), 6–2
 Hurkacz (POL)
W 7–5, 3–6, 6–3
 Chardy (FRA)
L 6–7(3–7), 6–4, 1–6
Did not advance
Andy Murray
Joe Salisbury
Men's doubles N/A  Herbert/
Mahut (FRA)
W 6–3, 6–2
 Krawietz/
Pütz (GER)
W 6–2, 7–6(7–2)
 Čilić/
Dodig (CRO)
L 6–4, 6–7(2–7), [7–10]
Did not advance
Jamie Murray
Neal Skupski
N/A  Molteni/
Zeballos (ARG)
W 6–7(3–7), 6–4, [13–11]
 McLachlan/
Nishikori (JPN)
L 3–6, 4–6
Did not advance
Heather Watson Women's singles  Friedsam (GER)
L 6–7(5–7), 3–6
Did not advance

Triathlon

Main articles: Triathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Triathlon at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Great Britain confirmed five quota places in the triathlon events for Tokyo. British Triathlon announced the athletes to occupy four of those places on 4 November 2020, including returning medallists Jonathan Brownlee and Vicky Holland. Reigning double Olympic champion Alistair Brownlee was not confirmed in the fifth and final quota place, which remains to be filled.[141] On 14 June 2021, Team GB announced that Alex Yee had been selected to fill the remaining place on the British triathlon squad for Tokyo.[142]

Individual
Athlete Event Swim (1.5 km) Trans 1 Bike (40 km) Trans 2 Run (10 km) Total Time Rank
Jonathan Brownlee Men's 17:49 0:38 56.38 0:26 30.22 1:45:53 5
Alex Yee 18:09 0:38 56.17 0:27 29.44 1:45:15 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Vicky Holland Women's 19:12 0:48 1:05:24 0:31 34:20 2:00:10 13
Jess Learmonth 18:24 0:43 1:02:56 0:34 35:51 1:58:28 9
Georgia Taylor-Brown 18:31 0:42 1:03:11 0:34 33:52 1:56:50 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Relay
Athlete Event Swim (300 m) Trans 1 Bike (7 km) Trans 2 Run (2 km) Total Group Time Rank
Jonathan Brownlee Mixed relay 4:02 0:36 8:35 0:25 5:25 20:03 N/A
Alex Yee 4:08 0:36 9:31 0:25 5:28 20:28
Jess Learmonth 3:40 0:40 10:15 0:27 6:15 21:16
Georgia Taylor-Brown 4:23 0:38 10:16 0:30 6:07 21:54
Total N/A 1:23:41 1st place, gold medalist(s)

Weightlifting

Main articles: Weightlifting at the 2020 Summer Olympics and Weightlifting at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Qualification

Four female weightlifters qualified for Great Britain, one in each of the following weight classes. Former Commonwealth Games champion Zoe Smith (women's 59 kg), European medallist Sarah Davies (women's 64 kg), and European champion Emily Campbell (women's +87 kg) secured one of the top eight slots each in their respective weight divisions based on the IWF Absolute World Rankings. On 30 June 2021, Team GB confirmed their selection for Tokyo.[143] On 4 July 2021, Colombia confirmed they would cede the women's −76 kg quota place as part of an agreement with the IWF following multiple doping violations, thus granting Emily Muskett,[144] European champion in the non-Olympic −71 kg category, a quota place in the event. Muskett's place on the Olympic team was confirmed by Team GB on 6 July 2021.[145]

Athlete Event Snatch Clean & Jerk Total Rank
Result Rank Result Rank
Zoe Smith Women's −59 kg 87 8 113 7 200 8
Sarah Davies Women's −64 kg 100 7 127 3 227 5
Emily Muskett Women's −76 kg 98 9 124 7 222 7
Emily Campbell Women's +87 kg 122 4 161 2 283 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

Sports not contested by Great Britain in Tokyo

Basketball

Main article: Basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Neither the men's nor the women's team qualified for the full court tournaments. The men's team were eliminated in the early stages, failing to emerge from their first-round group in qualification for the FIBA Basketball World Cup. The women's team fared much better, after a groundbreaking run to a fourth-place finish in the Women's EuroBasket tournament meant that they made the final qualification tournament in Belgrade. The team narrowly missed out on qualification at that tournament, largely due to a tight loss to South Korea, with whom they were vying for the third of three qualification places behind Spain and China.

Neither the men's nor women's 3x3 teams qualified.

Baseball

Main article: Baseball at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain failed to emerge from the 2019 European Baseball Championship to reach the final qualification tournament, finishing ninth.

Handball

Main article: Handball at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain's 10th-place finish at the 2017 IHF Emerging Nations Championship ended their participation in qualification for the men's Olympic tournament. Great Britain did not enter a team in qualification for the women's Olympic event.

Karate

Main article: Karate at the 2020 Summer Olympics

At the conclusion of the Final Karate Olympic Qualification Tournament, Great Britain had failed to advance any karateka to the Olympic Karate tournament.

Softball

Main article: Softball at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain lost to Italy in the final of the combined Africa/Europe continental qualifying tournament so narrowly missing out on a place in Tokyo.

Surfing

Main article: Surfing at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain failed to qualify any surfers for the Games.

Volleyball

Main article: Volleyball at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Team GB had no qualified teams in either full court or beach volleyball.

Water polo

Main article: Water polo at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Team GB did not qualify.

Wrestling

Main article: Wrestling at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain did not qualify any athletes.

See also

References

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