Apriyani Rahayu
Personal information
CountryIndonesia
Born (1998-04-29) 29 April 1998 (age 23)
Lawulo, Konawe, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia[1]
Height1.63 m (5 ft 4 in)[2]
Weight60 kg (132 lb)[2]
HandednessRight
Women's & mixed doubles
Highest ranking3 (WD with Greysia Polii 20 September 2018)
100 (XD with Panji Akbar Sudrajat 21 January 2016)
Current ranking6 (WD with Greysia Polii 2 November 2021)
BWF profile

Apriyani Rahayu (born 29 April 1998) is an Indonesian badminton player specializing in doubles.[3][4] She and Greysia Polii are the reigning Olympic champions in the women's doubles following their win at the 2020 Summer Olympics.[5] She won gold at the 2019 Southeast Asian Games,[6] and two bronze medals at the World Championships in 2018 and 2019.[7] Rahayu also won bronze medals at the 2018 Asian Games in the women's team and doubles with her current partner Greysia Polii.[8]

Early life

Apriyani Rahayu was born in Lawulo village, a remote settlement in Konawe Regency in Southeast Sulawesi. She is the youngest child of an agricultural worker named Ameruddin Pora and his wife, Sitti Jauhar.[9] As a child Rahayu would fight with neighborhood boys, and her father encouraged her to devote her energy to badminton instead, which she agreed to. According to Rahayu's cousin, her father served as her trainer, with a training regimen including running 10 kilometers to competitions and practicing on a homemade court behind his house lined with areca nut trees. Pora was self-sufficient but poor. Rahayu used a homemade wooden racquet with fishing line for string, until her father was able to sell enough vegetables to buy a real racquet.[10][11] However, Pora himself credits Rahayu's mother as providing her with support and training. Sitti Jauhar was an enthusiastic player of badminton, table tennis and volleyball and encouraged Rahayu to be tough and competitive.[12] In 2007, at the age of 9, she represented Konawe Regency in a regional competition and was scouted. In 2011, at the age of 13, she was recruited to a Jakarta club for international level play. Sitti Jauhar died in 2015 while Apriyani was at a championship in Peru, but she played through after hearing the news, winning two medals.

Career

In 2 August 2021, at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics she partnered with Greysia Polii in the women's doubles. In the finals they defeated 2017 world champion Chen Qingchen and Jia Yifan. They became the first unseeded pair to win the gold medal in women's doubles. This was Indonesia's first Olympic gold in women's doubles.[13][14] She and Polii are the third and fourth Indonesian women to win Olympic gold after Susi Susanti in 1992 and Liliyana Natsir in 2016.[15] Rahayu and Polii's win made Indonesia the only country outside of China to have won gold medals in all five disciplines of Badminton at the Summer Olympics.[16] After her Olympic success, the Student Sports Training Center in Jakarta was named after her and Greysia Polii.[17]

Awards and nominations

Award Year Category Result Ref.
BWF Awards 2017 Eddy Choong Most Promising Player of the Year Nominated [18]
2018 Nominated [19]
Forbes 2021 30 Under 30 Indonesia (Sports) Placed [20]
Indonesian Sport Awards 2018 Favorite Women's Double Athlete with Greysia Polii Won [21]
Favorite Women's Team Athlete with 2018 Asian Games women's badminton team Won

Achievements

Olympic Games

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2020 Musashino Forest Sport Plaza, Tokyo, Japan Indonesia Greysia Polii China Chen Qingchen
China Jia Yifan
21–19, 21–15
Gold

BWF World Championships

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2018 Nanjing Youth Olympic Sports Park,
Nanjing, China
Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Mayu Matsumoto
Japan Wakana Nagahara
12–21, 21–23
Bronze
2019 St. Jakobshalle,
Basel, Switzerland
Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Mayu Matsumoto
Japan Wakana Nagahara
12–21, 19–21
Bronze

Asian Games

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2018 Istora Gelora Bung Karno,
Jakarta, Indonesia
Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Misaki Matsutomo
Japan Ayaka Takahashi
15–21, 17–21
Bronze

Southeast Asian Games

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2019 Muntinlupa Sports Complex,
Metro Manila, Philippines
Indonesia Greysia Polii Thailand Chayanit Chaladchalam
Thailand Phataimas Muenwong
21–3, 21–18
Gold

BWF World Junior Championships

Girls' doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 Stadium Sultan Abdul Halim,
Alor Setar, Malaysia
Indonesia Rosyita Eka Putri Sari China Chen Qingchen
China Jia Yifan
11–21, 14–21
Silver

Mixed doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 Centro de Alto Rendimiento de la Videna,
Lima, Peru
Indonesia Fachryza Abimanyu China He Jiting
China Du Yue
13–21, 10–21
Bronze

Asian Junior Championships

Mixed doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 CPB Badminton Training Center,
Bangkok, Thailand
Indonesia Fachryza Abimanyu China Zheng Siwei
China Chen Qingchen
14–21, 14–21
Bronze
2016 CPB Badminton Training Center,
Bangkok, Thailand
Indonesia Rinov Rivaldy South Korea Kim Won-ho
South Korea Lee Yu-rim
17–21, 20–22
Bronze

BWF World Tour (6 titles, 2 runners-up)

The BWF World Tour, which was announced on 19 March 2017 and implemented in 2018,[22] is a series of elite badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). The BWF World Tours are divided into levels of World Tour Finals, Super 1000, Super 750, Super 500, Super 300 (part of the HSBC World Tour), and the BWF Tour Super 100.[23]

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Level Partner Opponent Score Result
2018 Indonesia Masters Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Misaki Matsutomo
Japan Ayaka Takahashi
17–21, 12–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2018 India Open Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Thailand Jongkolphan Kititharakul
Thailand Rawinda Prajongjai
21–18, 21–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2018 Thailand Open Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Misaki Matsutomo
Japan Ayaka Takahashi
21–13, 21–10 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2019 Malaysia Masters Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Japan Yuki Fukushima
Japan Sayaka Hirota
21–18, 16–21, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2019 India Open Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Malaysia Chow Mei Kuan
Malaysia Lee Meng Yean
21–11, 25–23 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2020 Indonesia Masters Super 500 Indonesia Greysia Polii Denmark Maiken Fruergaard
Denmark Sara Thygesen
18–21, 21–11, 23–21 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2020 Spain Masters Super 300 Indonesia Greysia Polii Bulgaria Gabriela Stoeva
Bulgaria Stefani Stoeva
18–21, 22–20, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2020 (I) Thailand Open Super 1000 Indonesia Greysia Polii Thailand Jongkolphan Kititharakul
Thailand Rawinda Prajongjai
21–15, 21–12 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner

BWF Superseries (1 title, 1 runner-up)

The BWF Superseries, which was launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007,[24] was a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries levels were Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries consisted of twelve tournaments around the world that had been introduced since 2011.[25] Successful players were invited to the Superseries Finals, which were held at the end of each year.

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2017 French Open Indonesia Greysia Polii South Korea Lee So-hee
South Korea Shin Seung-chan
21–17, 21–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2017 Hong Kong Open Indonesia Greysia Polii China Chen Qingchen
China Jia Yifan
21–14, 16–21, 15–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF Superseries Finals tournament
  BWF Superseries Premier tournament
  BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix (1 title)

The BWF Grand Prix had two levels, the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It was a series of badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) and played between 2007 and 2017.

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2017 Thailand Open Indonesia Greysia Polii Thailand Chayanit Chaladchalam
Thailand Phataimas Muenwong
21–12, 21–12 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
  BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 Singapore International Indonesia Jauza Fadhila Sugiarto Indonesia Melvira Oklamona
Indonesia Rika Rositawati
22–20, 16–21, 21–10 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Indonesia International Indonesia Jauza Fadhila Sugiarto Indonesia Dian Fitriani
Indonesia Nadya Melati
12–21, 21–18, 22–20 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2015 Indonesia International Indonesia Panji Akbar Sudrajat Indonesia Irfan Fadhilah
Indonesia Weni Anggraini
16–21, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2016 Indonesia International Indonesia Agripinna Prima Rahmanto Putra Indonesia Yantoni Edy Saputra
Indonesia Marsheilla Gischa Islami
21–12, 21–12 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF International Series tournament

Performance timeline

Key
W F SF QF #R RR Q# A G S B NH N/A
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (G) gold, (S) silver or (B) bronze medal; (NH) not held; (N/A) not applicable.
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

National team

Team events 2014 2015 2016
Asian Junior Championships QF B QF
World Junior Championships S S 5th
Team events 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Southeast Asian Games B NH S NH
Asia Team Championships NH B NH QF NH
Asian Games NH B NH
Uber Cup NH QF NH QF NH
Sudirman Cup RR NH B NH QF

Individual competitions

Event 2014 2015 2016
Asian Junior Championships QF (GD)
3R (XD)
3R (GD)
B (XD)
3R (GD)
B (XD)
World Junior Championships S (GD) 4R (GD)
B (XD)
4R (GD)
QF (XD)
Event 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Southeast Asian Games 1R NH G NH
Asian Championships A QF 1R NH
Asian Games NH B NH
World Championships DNQ B B NH Q
Olympic Games NH G NH
Tournament BWF Superseries / Grand Prix BWF World Tour Best
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Thailand Masters NH 2R (WD)
2R (XD)
QF A NH QF ('17)
Swiss Open A 2R A NH A 2R ('17)
German Open A QF NH QF ('19)
All England Open A 2R 1R QF 1R (WD) 2R QF ('19)
Malaysia Masters A 1R (WD) A F SF (WD) F ('19)
New Zealand Open A SF A NH SF ('17)
Australian Open A SF NH SF ('19)
India Open A W W NH W ('18, '19)
Spain Masters NH A W (WD) A W ('20)
Malaysia Open A 1R (WD) A 2R NH 2R ('19)
Singapore Open A 1R (WD) 1R (WD) A NH 1R ('15, '16)
Thailand Open A NH 2R (WD) w/d (WD) W W QF W (WD) NH W ('17, '18, '20)
SF (WD)
Korea Open A QF w/d 2R NH QF ('17)
Chinese Taipei Open A SF NH SF ('19)
China Open A 1R SF QF NH SF ('18)
Japan Open A 2R SF QF NH SF ('18)
Denmark Open A 1R SF 2R A QF SF ('18)
French Open A W SF 2R NH A W ('17)
Fuzhou China Open A QF 1R NH QF ('18)
Hong Kong Open A F SF w/d NH F ('17)
Indonesia Masters 1R (WD)
Q1 (XD)
2R (WD)
1R (XD)
2R(WD)
1R (XD)
A NH F SF W (WD)
2R (XD)
Q W ('20)
Indonesia Open A 2R (WD) 2R QF 2R NH Q QF ('18)
Superseries /
World Tour Finals
DNQ RR RR RR (WD) RR ('18, '19, '20)
Year-end ranking 431 (WD)
1170 (XD)
212 (WD)
387(XD)
77 (WD)
100 (XD)
58 (WD)
316 (XD)
11 4 8 8 (WD) 3 (WD)
100 (XD)

Record against selected opponents

Record against year-end Finals finalists, World Championships semi-finalists, and Olympic quarter-finalists.[26]

Greysia Polii

Players M W L Diff.
China Chen Qingchen & Jia Yifan 10 4 6 –2
China Du Yue & Li Yinhui 7 4 3 +1
Denmark Christinna Pedersen & Kamilla Rytter Juhl 2 1 1 0
Japan Yuki Fukushima & Sayaka Hirota 11 3 8 –5
Japan Mayu Matsumoto & Wakana Nagahara 5 1 4 –3
Japan Misaki Matsutomo & Ayaka Takahashi 12 2 10 –8
Japan Shiho Tanaka & Koharu Yonemoto 4 3 1 +2
Malaysia Vivian Hoo Kah Mun & Woon Khe Wei 1 0 1 –1
Netherlands Selena Piek & Cheryl Seinen 1 1 0 +1
South Korea Chang Ye-na & Lee So-hee 1 0 1 –1
South Korea Kim So-yeong & Kong Hee-yong 3 1 2 –1
South Korea Lee So-hee & Shin Seung-chan 8 6 2 +4

References

  1. ^ Hasyim, Irsyan (27 July 2020). "Cerita Apriyani Rahayu: dari Raket Kayu sampai Perjuangan Ayah Cari Dana". Tempo. Retrieved 10 July 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Athlete: Apriyani Rahayu". Asian Games 2018. Archived from the original on 28 October 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Players: Apriani Rahayu". Badminton World Federation. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Pemain: Apriani Rahayu". Badminton Association of Indonesia (in Indonesian). Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  5. ^ "Rahayu Apriyani". Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  6. ^ Saputra, Ramadani (10 December 2019). "Indonesia slips to 4th rank despite two golds in badminton". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  7. ^ Widiastuti, Rina (25 August 2019). "Greysia / Apriyani Raih Perunggu di Kejuaraan Dunia Bulu Tangkis". Tempo (in Indonesian). Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Dibekuk Jepang, Greysia/Apriyani Sabet Perunggu Asian Games 2018". Bola (in Indonesian). 26 August 2018. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  9. ^ "Terkabulnya Doa dari Lawulo untuk Apriyani dan Greysia". Kompas (in Indonesian). 2 August 2021.
  10. ^ Rosniawanti Fikry Tahir (3 August 2021). "Cerita Apriyani Rahayu Kecil: Raket Kayu, Berjalan 10 Km Hingga Minta Bantuan". Tempo. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  11. ^ Muh Ridwan Kadir (1 August 2021). "Masa Kecil Apriyani Rahayu di Konawe, Atlit Bulutangkis Indonesia ke Final Olimpiade Tokyo". Tribun News Sultra (in Indonesian). Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  12. ^ "The Story Of The Hero Of The Tokyo Olympics, Apriyani Rahayu: Father Made Wooden Rackets To Carve Badminton History". VOI. 3 August 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  13. ^ "Greysia/Apriyani Rebut Medali Emas Olimpiade Tokyo". CNN Indonesia. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  14. ^ Kumar, Prem (10 July 2021). "Road to Tokyo: All About Keeping It Simple". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 10 July 2021. Retrieved 17 July 2021.
  15. ^ "Dari Susy Susanti ke Greysia / Apriyani, Ini Daftar Peraih Emas di Olimpiade". Tempo. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  16. ^ "Indonesia take shock gold in women's doubles badminton, People's Republic of China claim silver". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  17. ^ Dewa, W; Kenzu, T (14 August 2021). "Jakarta's sports hall enshrine Greysia-Apriani names". Antara. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  18. ^ "Axelsen, Tai in Battle for Player Awards". Badminton World Federation. 7 December 2017.
  19. ^ "Nominees Announced for BWF's Night of Nights". Badminton World Federation. 7 December 2018.
  20. ^ "30 Under 30". Forbes Indonesia March 2021 Special Issue
  21. ^ "Inilah Daftar Terfavorit Indonesian Sport Awards 2018" (in Indonesian). Detik. 23 November 2018. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  22. ^ Alleyne, Gayle (19 March 2017). "BWF Launches New Events Structure". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  23. ^ Sukumar, Dev (10 January 2018). "Action-Packed Season Ahead!". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 13 January 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  24. ^ "BWF Launches Super Series". Badminton Australia. 15 December 2006. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007.
  25. ^ "Yonex All England Elevated To BWF Premier Super Series Event". IBadmintonstore. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2013.
  26. ^ "Apriyani Rahayu's Profile – Head To Head". BWF-Tournament Software. Retrieved 4 September 2021.