Chen Yufei
陈雨菲
Personal information
CountryChina
Born (1998-03-01) 1 March 1998 (age 25)
Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
Height1.71 m (5 ft 7 in)
Years active2013–present
HandednessRight
CoachLuo Yigang
Women's singles
Career record350 wins, 104 losses
Highest ranking1 (17 December 2019)
Current ranking2 (2 January 2024)
Medal record
Women's badminton
Representing  China
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2020 Tokyo Women's singles
World Championships
Silver medal – second place 2022 Tokyo Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2017 Glasgow Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2019 Basel Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2023 Copenhagen Women's singles
Sudirman Cup
Gold medal – first place 2019 Nanning Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2021 Vantaa Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2023 Suzhou Mixed team
Silver medal – second place 2017 Gold Coast Mixed team
Uber Cup
Gold medal – first place 2020 Aarhus Women's team
Silver medal – second place 2022 Bangkok Women's team
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Bangkok Women's team
Asian Games
Silver medal – second place 2018 Jakarta–Palembang Women's team
Silver medal – second place 2022 Hangzhou Women's singles
Silver medal – second place 2022 Hangzhou Women's team
Asian Championships
Silver medal – second place 2018 Wuhan Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2019 Wuhan Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2023 Dubai Women's singles
Asia Mixed Team Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2017 Ho Chi Minh Mixed team
Asian Team Championships
Gold medal – first place 2016 Hyderabad Women's team
Silver medal – second place 2018 Alor Setar Women's team
World Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 2014 Alor Setar Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2015 Lima Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2016 Bilbao Girls' singles
Gold medal – first place 2016 Bilbao Mixed team
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Bangkok Mixed team
Asian Youth Games
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Nanjing Mixed doubles
Asian Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 2013 Kota Kinabalu Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2014 Taipei Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2015 Bangkok Mixed team
Gold medal – first place 2016 Bangkok Girls' singles
Gold medal – first place 2016 Bangkok Mixed team
Silver medal – second place 2014 Taipei Girls' singles
BWF profile

Chen Yufei (Chinese: 陈雨菲; pinyin: Chén Yǔfēi; born 1 March 1998) is a Chinese badminton player. She is the reigning Olympic champion.[1] In her junior career, she won the girls' singles titles at the 2016 Asian and the World Junior Championships.[2][3] At the same year, Chen clinched her first senior title at the Macau Open.[4] She won a bronze medal at the 2017 World Championships[5] and was awarded as the Eddy Choong Most Promising Player of the Year in 2017.[6][7] On 17 December 2019, she reached a career-high BWF World Ranking as world number 1, and finished the year as the year-end no.1.[8] Other achievements include winning the World Tour Finals in 2019[9] and silver medals at the 2022 World Championships[10] and Asian Games.[11]

Career

2014–2016

Chen Yufei did started playing in international level from the year 2013, being aged only 15. In 2014, she won the silver medal in the Asian Junior Championships after being beaten by Akane Yamaguchi in the final.[12] She finished runner-up in the German Junior International event after being beaten by Qin Jinjing in the final.[13] In 2015, she reached the finals of the China International but lost to Nozomi Okuhara.[14] Her first Grand Prix Gold final was at the 2015 Indonesia Masters, in which she reached the final after astounding several seeded players,[15] but lost to her teammate He Bingjiao.[16] In 2016, she won the major junior titles, including the Asian Junior Championships after beating Gregoria Mariska Tunjung in a summit clash,[17] and the BWF World Junior Championships by beating Pornpawee Chochuwong in the final.[3] She also won the 2016 Macau Open Grand Prix Gold in the end of the year by defeating Chen Xiaoxin.[18]

2017

She reached the final of the 2017 Swiss Open Grand Prix Gold and had to settle for second best after losing to the same opponent whom she defeated in Macau Open final in 2016, Chen Xiaoxin.[19] In the 2017 BWF World Championships, the 19-year-old Chen participated as the 9th seed in the tournament. After defeating Pai Yu-po, the lower ranked Chinese Taipei's player in the first round, she set her meeting with the top seeded Akane Yamaguchi. She bulldozed her way through with the 21–18, 21–19 victory and stunned the world.[20] This was not over yet, in the quarter-final, she defeated another higher seeded player, the former world champion Ratchanok Intanon in 3 games & assured herself of first ever medal in this elite event. However, in the semifinal, she lost to P. V. Sindhu and had to satisfy herself with the bronze medal.[5] With her strong performances, she got a ticket to contest in the year-ending 2017 BWF Super Series Finals. In the group stage, she lost to Tai Tzu-ying (1–2) but won against Sung Ji-hyun (2–0) & Ratchanok Intanon (2–1) which meant she could confirm her place in the semifinal. But again, in the semi-finals, she lost to P. V. Sindhu in straight games.[21]

2018

She contested in the 2018 German Open final but lost to Akane Yamaguchi.[22] She won the silver medal at the 2018 Badminton Asia Championships losing to Tai Tzu-ying in straight games.[23] She fell to her 9th consecutive defeat against Tai Tzu-ying in the final of the Indonesia Open, in which she took the opening game but \wasn't sufficient to beat Tai and lost the next two.[24] In the World Championships, she failed to cross the quarter-final after being downed by Akane Yamaguchi, a player Chen defeated last year in straight games.[25] Akane Yamaguchi again proved difficult for Chen to crack, this time at the Asian games where she lost to her in quarter-finals.[26] In her second Super 1000 final at the China Open, which is the highest level of World tour events in badminton, she lost to the reigning world champion, Carolina Marín, in straight games.[27] At the 2018 Fuzhou China Open, a Super 750 event, she finally broke her jinx of losing in the finals after defeating Nozomi Okuhara tamely with 21–10, 21–16, and thus winning her first ever World tour title.[28] She again qualified for taking part in the season-ending championships, this time renamed as the "World Tour Finals", which was held in her home country China. In the 1st match of the group stage against Ratchanok Intanon, she injured herself in the deciding game and lost the match. She wasn't recovered from that yet but she played the 2nd match against the Canadian Michelle Li & again lost. In the final group match, she twisted her ankle in the very early stage of 1st game which forced her to retire and her overall campaign ended.[29]

2019

2019 proved the best ever year in Chen Yufei's career as she earned multiple titles and honour of becoming the most dominant player of 2019 in her category. Starting with the 2019 All England Open, she defeated Tai Tzu-ying in the final, a player she struggled to beat in her last 11 encounters. Chen finally broke that jinx and won her first super 1000 title.[30] After that, she won the Swiss Open title following her win against Saena Kawakami in the final clash.[31] She competed in the 2019 Badminton Asia Championships as a top seed after defending champion Tai withdrew from the tournament. She made her way to the semifinal and was discomfited by Akane Yamaguchi (1–2), thus claiming the bronze medal.[32] In the 2019 Sudirman Cup, she helped her team to win the record-breaking 11th title, in which she scored a point by defeating Akane Yamaguchi, and eventually Japan was crushed in the final with 3–0 tally by China.[33] Her best form wasn't dipped yet, as she claimed the next title in the Australian Open by totally outplaying Nozomi Okuhara in the final with a very one-sided scoreline 21–15, 21–3.[34] She claimed the Thailand Open title victory by winning against Ratchanok Intanon.[35]

With all her success in 1st half of the year, she was considered as China's best contender for gold in 2019 BWF World Championships in her category. She started well, winning against Pornpawee Chochuwong in round 1, Michelle Li in 2nd round in 3 games. In the quarter-final, she was tested severely by Danish Mia Blichfeldt who once appeared to create an upset by leading 15–12 against her in the decider, but Chen's persistence led her way to the victory and assured her of second medal in this Grade 1 event. In the semifinal her opponent was P. V. Sindhu who had outplayed her in the 2017 World Championships. Chen again proved low against Sindhu in World Championships and was defeated with a big margin 7–21, 14–21. Thus, she again settled for a bronze medal.[36] Leaving her disappointments, she returned very strong and again won series of titles. She won the 2019 Fuzhou China Open again, by beating the same opponent from the last year, Nozomi Okuhara, but this time with tougher opposition.[37] After beating Ratchanok Intanon in the final, she won her 6th World tour title by winning the Hong Kong open.[38] Going into the 2019 BWF World Tour Finals as the best title winning contender, in the group stage, she downed all her opponents P. V. Sindhu (2–1), Akane Yamaguchi (2–0) and He Bingjiao (2–0) to reach the semifinal. She was drawn with Yamaguchi yet again and she displayed a very dominant performance to reach the final.[39] In the final, she showed a great fighting spirit to beat Tai Tzu-ying after being a game down & won the title 12–21, 21–12, 21–17. With her emphatic 7 titles in the year, she became another player from China to become World no. 1 player, as the last time China had the World's top player in Women's singles was in 2015 (Li Xuerui).[9]

2020–2021

Reaching the final yet again, this time at the 2020 Malaysia Masters, she maintained her unbeaten record at the finals since 2018 Fuzhou China Open, and outgunned Tai Tzu-ying for the title in straight games.[40] She reached her second consecutive 2020 All England Open final and faced opposition from the same rival of last year, Tai Tzu-ying. This time she suffered defeat, and was dethroned from the World no. 1 position.[41]

Chen competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics as the number one seed in the women's singles.[42] In the final, she beat Tai Tzu-ying in an extremely intense match 21–18, 19–21, 21–18 to win the gold medal.[1] In October, she helped the Chinese national team to retain the Sudirman Cup.[43]

2022

Chen won the Indonesia Masters in June, defeating Ratchanok Intanon in the final in three games.[44] However, she lost seven finals during this season, including a World Championship loss to Akane Yamaguchi during her career's first final in that event,[10] and three losses to her compatriot He Bingjiao. However, due to her seven final appearances in the World Tour, she qualified for the World Tour Finals as the first seed. Although she suffered a surprise loss against Gregoria Mariska Tunjung,[45] she beat Akane Yamaguchi after 5 straight losses and An Se-young to top the group. However, she could not replicate her group stage performance in the semi-finals, as she lost to Akane Yamaguchi in straight games.[46]

2023

Chen reached the final of the All England Open but lost to An Se-young in a tight three-game battle.[47] She helped the national team defend the Sudirman Cup title at home soil after delivering the final win against An Se-young in straight games.[48] In June's Indonesia Open, she defeated another Olympic champion Carolina Marin in straight games to win her first title since last year's Indonesia Masters.[49] She participated at the World Championships but could only settle for a bronze medal as she was defeated by An Se-young in straight games.[50] After helping the national team to win a silver medal at the women's team event at the delayed 2022 Asian Games,[51] she was defeated by An in the final of the singles event in three games, earning another silver medal.[11] Two weeks later, she won the Denmark Open by defeating Marin again in straight games.[52]

Achievements

Olympic Games

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result Ref
2020 Musashino Forest Sport Plaza, Tokyo, Japan Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 21–18, 19–21, 21–18 Gold [1]

World Championships

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result Ref
2017 Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland India P. V. Sindhu 13–21, 10–21 Bronze Bronze [5]
2019 St. Jakobshalle, Basel, Switzerland India P. V. Sindhu 7–21, 14–21 Bronze Bronze [36]
2022 Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan Japan Akane Yamaguchi 12–21, 21–10, 14–21 Silver Silver [10]
2023 Royal Arena,Copenhagen, Denmark South Korea An Se-young 19–21, 15–21 Bronze Bronze [50]

Asian Games

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result Ref
2022 Binjiang Gymnasium, Hangzhou, China South Korea An Se-young 18–21, 21–17, 8–21 Silver Silver [11]

Asian Championships

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2018 Wuhan Sports Center Gymnasium, Wuhan, China Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 19–21, 20–22 Silver Silver
2019 Wuhan Sports Center Gymnasium, Wuhan, China Japan Akane Yamaguchi 21–15, 16–21, 17–21 Bronze Bronze
2023 Sheikh Rashid Bin Hamdan Indoor Hall, Dubai, United Arab Emirates South Korea An Se-young 21–16, 11–21, 19–21 Bronze Bronze

World Junior Championships

Girls' singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2016 Bilbao Arena, Bilbao, Spain Thailand Pornpawee Chochuwong 21–14, 21–17 Gold Gold

Asian Youth Games

Mixed doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 Nanjing Sport Institute, Nanjing, China China Shi Yuqi Chinese Taipei Lai Yu-hua
Chinese Taipei Lee Chia-hsin
21–16, 21–13 Bronze Bronze

Asian Junior Championships

Girls' singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2014 Taipei Gymnasium, Taipei, Taiwan Japan Akane Yamaguchi 10–21, 15–21 Silver Silver
2016 CPB Badminton Training Center, Bangkok, Thailand Indonesia Gregoria Mariska Tunjung 25–23, 21–14 Gold Gold

BWF World Tour (14 titles, 13 runners-up)

The BWF World Tour, which was announced on 19 March 2017 and implemented in 2018,[53] is a series of elite badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). The BWF World Tour is divided into levels of World Tour Finals, Super 1000, Super 750, Super 500, Super 300 (part of the BWF World Tour), and the BWF Tour Super 100.[54]

Women's singles

Year Tournament Level Opponent Score Result Ref
2018 German Open Super 300 Japan Akane Yamaguchi 19–21, 21–6, 12–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [22]
2018 Indonesia Open Super 1000 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 23–21, 15–21, 9–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [24]
2018 China Open Super 1000 Spain Carolina Marín 18–21, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [27]
2018 Fuzhou China Open Super 750 Japan Nozomi Okuhara 21–10, 21–16 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [28]
2019 All England Open Super 1000 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 21–17, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [30]
2019 Swiss Open Super 300 Japan Saena Kawakami 21–9, 21–16 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [31]
2019 Australian Open Super 300 Japan Nozomi Okuhara 21–15, 21–3 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [34]
2019 Thailand Open Super 500 Thailand Ratchanok Intanon 22–20, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [35]
2019 Fuzhou China Open Super 750 Japan Nozomi Okuhara 9–21, 21–12, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [37]
2019 Hong Kong Open Super 500 Thailand Ratchanok Intanon 21–18, 13–21, 21–13 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [38]
2019 BWF World Tour Finals World Tour Finals Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 12–21, 21–12, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [9]
2020 Malaysia Masters Super 500 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 21–17, 21–10 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [40]
2020 All England Open Super 1000 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 19–21, 15–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 German Open Super 300 China He Bingjiao 14–21, 25–27 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 Korea Masters Super 300 China He Bingjiao 14–21, 21–14, 9–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 Thailand Open Super 500 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 15–21, 21–17, 12–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 Indonesia Masters Super 500 Thailand Ratchanok Intanon 21–16, 18–21, 21–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2022 Malaysia Open Super 750 Thailand Ratchanok Intanon 15–21, 21–13, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 Malaysia Masters Super 500 South Korea An Se-young 17–21, 5–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2022 Denmark Open Super 750 China He Bingjiao 20–22, 21–12, 10–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2023 All England Open Super 1000 South Korea An Se-young 17–21, 21–10, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [47]
2023 Indonesia Open Super 1000 Spain Carolina Marín 21–18, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [49]
2023 Denmark Open Super 750 Spain Carolina Marín 21–14, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [52]
2023 French Open Super 750 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 21–17, 22–20 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2023 Japan Masters Super 500 Indonesia Gregoria Mariska Tunjung 12–21, 12–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2023 China Masters Super 750 China Han Yue 18–21, 21–4, 0–0 retired 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2024 India Open Super 750 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 16–21, 12–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

BWF Grand Prix (1 title, 2 runners-up)

The BWF Grand Prix had two levels, the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It was a series of badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) and played between 2007 and 2017.

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2015 Indonesian Masters China He Bingjiao 18–21, 9–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2016 Macau Open China Chen Xiaoxin 21–13, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2017 Swiss Open China Chen Xiaoxin 19–21, 14–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
  BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series (1 runner-up)

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2015 China International Japan Nozomi Okuhara 19–21, 16–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF International Series tournament

Performance timeline

Key
W F SF QF #R RR Q# A G S B NH N/A DNQ
(W) won; (F) finalist; (SF) semi-finalist; (QF) quarter-finalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (G) gold, (S) silver or (B) bronze medal; (NH) not held; (N/A) not applicable; (DNQ) did not qualify.
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

National team

Team events 2013 2014 2015 2016
Asian Junior Championships G G G G
World Junior Championships B G G G
Team events 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Ref
Asia Team Championships G NH S NH A NH A NH
Asia Mixed Team Championships NH B NH A NH A NH
Asian Games NH S NH S NH
Uber Cup A NH B NH G NH S NH
Sudirman Cup NH S NH G NH G NH G NH [33][43]

Individual competitions

Junior level

Events 2013 2014 2015 2016 Ref
Asian Junior Championships 3R S 3R G [12][17]
Asian Youth Games QF NH
World Junior Championships 4R 3R QF G [3]
Events 2013
Asian Youth Games B

Senior level

Events 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Ref
Asian Championships QF S B NH A B [23][32]
Asian Games NH QF NH S NH [26]
World Championships B QF B NH A S B NH [5][25][36][10]
Olympic Games NH G NH [1]
Tournament BWF Superseries / Grand Prix BWF World Tour Best Ref
2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024
Malaysia Open A QF 1R SF NH F SF SF F ('22)
India Open A NH A QF F F ('24)
Indonesia Masters A F 2R NH 1R SF 1R A W w/d w/d W ('22) [16][44]
Thailand Masters NH A SF A NH A SF ('17)
German Open A F A NH F SF F ('18, '22) [22]
All England Open A 2R SF W F A SF F W ('19) [30][41]
Swiss Open A F A W NH A w/d A W ('19) [19][31]
Malaysia Masters A 2R A QF A W NH F A W ('20) [40]
Thailand Open NH 2R A W A NH F w/d W ('19) [35]
Singapore Open A 2R A NH w/d SF SF ('23)
Indonesia Open A 1R F SF NH A SF W W ('23) [24]
Chinese Taipei Open A QF A NH A QF ('16)
Korea Open A QF A QF NH 2R SF SF ('23)
Japan Open A 2R SF SF SF NH SF 2R SF ('17, '18, '19, '22)
Australian Open A QF A W NH A W ('19) [34]
China Open A 2R 1R F SF NH SF F ('18) [27]
Hong Kong Open A QF 1R W NH A W ('19) [38]
Denmark Open A SF QF SF A w/d F W W ('23)
French Open A QF SF w/d NH A 2R W W ('23)
Korea Masters A NH F A F ('22)
Japan Masters NH F F ('23)
China Masters A SF SF QF W W NH W W ('18, '19, '23) [28][37]
Superseries / Tour Finals DNQ SF RR W DNQ SF SF W ('19) [21][29][9][46]
Macau Open 1R QF W A NH W ('16) [18]
New Zealand Open A 2R QF A NH N/A QF ('16)
Year-end ranking 491 50 18 8 4 1 2 3 3 2 1 [9]
Tournament 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Best Ref

Record against selected opponents

Record against year-end Finals finalists, World Championships semi-finalists, and Olympic quarter-finalists. Accurate as of 21 November 2023.[55]

Notes

  1. ^ Tournament software did not included the women's team event of the 2022 Asian Games results for head-to-head.[56]

References

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