Prime Minister of the Independent State of Papua New Guinea
Praim Minista bilong Papua Niugini (Tok Pisin)
Incumbent
James Marape
since 30 May 2019
StyleThe Honourable
StatusHead of Government
AbbreviationPM
Member of
SeatPort Moresby
AppointerGovernor-General
Term lengthAt the Governor-General's pleasure
PrecursorChief Minister of Papua and New Guinea
Inaugural holderMichael Somare
Formation16 September 1975
DeputyDeputy Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea
SalaryPGK346,037/US$ 97,201 annually (2015)[a][1]
Websitehttps://pmnec.gov.pg/

The prime minister of the Independent State of Papua New Guinea (Tok Pisin: Prai Minista bilong Papua Niugini) is Papua New Guinea's head of government, consequent on being the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the National Parliament. The prime minister serves as the head of his party, the head of the coalition government, and the chairman of the National Executive Council.

History

The office of Prime Minister was preceded by the Chief Minister.

2011–2012 constitutional crisis

Main article: 2011–2012 Papua New Guinean constitutional crisis

From December 2011, the office was disputed between Peter O'Neill of the People's National Congress Party and Sir Michael Somare of the National Alliance Party; the latter eventually supported O'Neill as Prime Minister on 3 August 2012, thus ending the constitutional crisis.

Department of the Prime Minister

The Department of the Prime Minister has the task of providing administrative services to the restoration exercise as well as advising the Prime Minister and other government leaders. After a July 1995 cabinet reshuffle by Julius Chan, functions of the department were expanded.[2]

Office

The office of the prime minister and other key government offices were initially located in Konedobu before being relocated to Waigani shortly after independence in 1975. Since April 2024, the Prime Minister's Office has been located at the newly-constructed Melanesia Haus, located opposite the main entrance to the National Parliament House.[3][4]

List of prime ministers of Papua New Guinea (1975–present)

Political parties
  Pangu Pati (Pangu)
  People's Progress Party (PPP)
  People's Democratic Movement (PDM)
  People's National Congress (PNC)
  National Alliance Party (NAP)
Status
  Denotes acting prime minister
No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Election Term of office Political party
Took office Left office Time in office
1 Michael Somare
(1936–2021)
1977 16 September 1975 11 March 1980 4 years, 177 days Pangu[5][6][7]
2 Sir Julius Chan
(born 1939)
11 March 1980 2 August 1982 2 years, 144 days PPP[5][6]
(1) Michael Somare
(1936–2021)
1982 2 August 1982 21 November 1985 3 years, 111 days Pangu[5][6][7]
3 Paias Wingti
(born 1951)
1987 21 November 1985 4 July 1988 2 years, 226 days PDM[5][6]
4 Sir Rabbie Namaliu
(1947–2023)
4 July 1988 17 July 1992 4 years, 13 days Pangu[5][6]
(3) Paias Wingti
(born 1951)
1992 17 July 1992 30 August 1994 2 years, 44 days PDM[6]
(2) Sir Julius Chan
(born 1939)
30 August 1994 27 March 1997 2 years, 209 days PPP[6][7]
5 John Giheno
(1949–2017)
27 March 1997 2 June 1997 67 days PPP
(2) Sir Julius Chan
(born 1939)
2 June 1997 22 July 1997 50 days PPP[6][7]
6 Bill Skate
(1953–2006)
1997 22 July 1997 14 July 1999 1 year, 357 days PNC[6][7]
7 Sir Mekere Morauta
(1946–2020)
14 July 1999 5 August 2002 3 years, 22 days PDM[7]
(1) Sir Michael Somare
(1936–2021)
2002
2007
5 August 2002 4 April 2011 8 years, 362 days NAP[5]
Sam Abal
(born 1958)
Acting prime minister
13 December 2010 17 January 2011 35 days NAP[5]
4 April 2011 2 August 2011 120 days
8 Peter O'Neill
(born 1965)
2012
2017
2 August 2011 29 May 2019 7 years, 300 days PNC
9 James Marape
(born 1971)
2022 30 May 2019 Incumbent 5 years, 20 days Pangu

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Equivalent to AU$160,815, 15 January 2015

References

  1. ^ "Salaries and Remuneration Commission – Determinations – 2015" (PDF). parliament.gov.pg. Papua New Guinea National Parliament. 15 January 2015.
  2. ^ "Department of Prime Minister and NEC". Destination PNG. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  3. ^ "PM's office relocated to Melanesia Haus". The National. Retrieved 17 April 2024.
  4. ^ "PM opens Melanesia Haus". Papua New Guinea Post-Courier. Retrieved 17 April 2024.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Background Note: Papua New Guinea". US State Department. April 2007. Retrieved 14 August 2007.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Dorney, Sean (2001). Papua New Guinea: people, politics and history since 1975. ABC Books. ISBN 0-7333-0945-3.
  7. ^ a b c d e f May, R.J. (2001). State and society in Papua New Guinea: the first twenty five years. Crawford House Publishing. ISBN 1-86333-204-9.