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Prime Minister of Ghana
Flag of Ghana.svg
AppointerGovernor-General of Ghana (1957–1960)
President of Ghana (1969–1972)
Formation6 March 1957
First holderKwame Nkrumah
Final holderKofi Abrefa Busia
Abolished13 January 1972

The prime minister of Ghana was the head of government of Ghana from 1957 to 1960 and again from 1969 to 1972.

History of the office

The country's first leader and prime minister was Kwame Nkrumah[1] of the Convention People's Party (CPP).[2] He held that post from the date of Ghana's independence – 6 March 1957 to 1 July 1960, when a new constitution came into effect that abolished the position. Nkrumah became President of the Republic, but was later overthrown in a 1966 military coup.

When Ghana returned to civilian rule in 1969, the parliamentary system was restored. The Progress Party (PP), led by Kofi Abrefa Busia, won parliamentary elections and he became Prime Minister on 1 October 1969. Busia's government was deposed in a military coup on 13 January 1972.

A presidential system was instituted in 1979 when civilian rule was re-established. The post of Prime Minister was never revived.

Prime Ministers of Ghana (1957–1972)

Political parties

  Convention People's Party
  Progress Party

No. Picture Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Political Party
Took office Left office
Prime Minister of the Dominion of Ghana
1
Kwame Nkrumah (JFKWHP-AR6409-A).jpg
Kwame Nkrumah
(1909–1972)
6 March 1957 1 July 1960 Convention People's Party
Prime Minister of the Republic of Ghana
Post abolished (1 July 1960 – 1 October 1969)
2
KofiBusia.png
Kofi Abrefa Busia
(1913–1978)
1 October 1969 13 January 1972 Progress Party
Post abolished (13 January 1972 – present)

See also

References

  1. ^ University, © Stanford; Stanford; California 94305 (3 July 2017). "Nkrumah, Kwame". The Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute. Retrieved 31 May 2020.
  2. ^ Biney, Ama Barbara (2017). Kwame Nkrumah: An Intellectual Biography. Ann Arbor, MI: ProQuest LLC.