Long March 11
Long March 11 launching on its third flight carrying Jilin-1 Shipin-07/08.
FunctionSmall orbital launch vehicle
ManufacturerCALT
Country of originChina
Size
Height20.8 m (68 ft)
Diameter2.0 m (6.6 ft)
Mass58,000 kg (128,000 lb)
Stages4
Capacity
Payload to LEO
Mass700 kg (1,500 lb)
Payload to SSO 700km
Mass350 kg (770 lb)
Associated rockets
FamilyLong March
ComparableMinotaur I, Pegasus, Start-1
Launch history
StatusActive
Launch sitesJiuquan
Xichang
Special converted barge, Yellow Sea
Total launches17
Success(es)17
First flight25 September 2015
Last flight25 December 2023
First stage – P35
Powered by1 Solid
Maximum thrust1,200 kilonewtons (270,000 lbf)
Burn time71 seconds
Second stage – Solid
Powered by1 Solid
Third stage – Solid
Powered by1 Solid
Fourth stage – Solid
Powered by1 Solid

The Long March 11 (Chinese: 長征十一號運載火箭), or Chang Zheng 11 as in pinyin, abbreviated LM-11 for export or CZ-11 within China (and designated 11H when launched from sea), is a Chinese four stage solid-propellant carrier rocket of the Long March family, which is developed by the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. It was designed with the ability to launch on short notice and it can launch from road vehicles (CZ-11) and ships (CZ-11H). Sometimes the rocket is thought to be likely based on the DF-31 missile, which is actually not true. The vehicle can be cold launched from a launch tube mounted on a road mobile vehicle.[1][2]

The maiden flight of the Long March 11 occurred on 25 September 2015.[3] The first sea launch occurred on 5 June 2019, from a converted barge stationed in the Yellow Sea.[4] Seventeen launches have been made as of December 2023, five of them from sea.

Launch Statistics

1
2
3
4
2015
2020
  •   Failure
  •   Partial failure
  •   Success
  •   Planned

List of launches

Main article: List of Long March launches

Flight number Serial number Date (UTC) Launch site Payload Orbit Outcome
1 Y1 25 September 2015
01:41
JSLC Pujiang-1
Tianwang 1A
Tianwang 1B
Tianwang 1C
SSO Success[3]
2 Y2 9 November 2016
23:42
JSLC XPNAV 1
Xiaoxiang 1
SSO Success[3][5]
3 Y3 19 January 2018
04:12
JSLC Jilin-1 07
Jilin-1 08
4 cubesats
SSO Success[6]
4 Y4 26 April 2018
04:42[7]
JSLC Zhuhai-1 OVS-1
Zhuhai-1 OHS-1/2/3/4
SSO Success
5 Y5 21 December 2018
23:51[8]
JSLC Hongyun-1 SSO Success
6 Y6 21 January 2019
05:42[9]
JSLC Jilin-1 Spectral 01/02
Lingque-1A
Xiaoxiang-1-03
SSO Success
7 HY1 5 June 2019
04:06[4]
Special converted barge (Tai Rui)
Yellow Sea
(34.90° N, 121.19° E)
Bufeng-1A
Bufeng-1B
Jilin-1 High Resolution 03A
Xiaoxiang-1-04
Tianqi-3
Tianxiang-1A
Tianxiang-1B
LEO Success
8 Y7 19 September 2019
06:42[10]
JSLC Zhuhai-1 OVS-3
Zhuhai-1 OHS-3A/B/C/D
SSO Success
9 Y8 29 May 2020
20:13 [11]
XSLC XJS G (Earth observation technology)
XJS H (Earth observation technology)
LEO Success
10 HY2 15 September 2020
01:23 [12]
Special converted barge (De Bo 3)
Yellow Sea
(34.31° N, 123.76° E)
Jilin-1 Gaofen-03B 01/02/03/04/05/06
Jilin-1 Gaofen-03C 01/02/03
SSO Success
11 Y9 9 December 2020
20:14 [13]
XSLC GECAM A
GECAM B
LEO Success
12 Y10 30 March 2022
02:29[14]
JSLC Tianping-2A
Tianping-2B
Tianping-2C
LEO Success
13 HY3 30 April 2022
03:30[15]
Special converted barge (Tai Rui)
East China Sea
(32.18° N, 123.79° E)
Jilin-1 Gaofen-03D 04/05/06/07
Jilin-1 Gaofen-04A
SSO Success
14 HY4 7 October 2022
13:10[16]
Special converted barge (DeFu 15002)
Offshore waters of Haiyang Port
(36.23° N, 121.20° E)
Centispace 1-S5/S6 LEO Success
15 Y12 16 December 2022
06:17[17]
XSLC Shiyan 21 LEO Success
16 Y11 15 March 2023
11:41[18]
JSLC Shiyan 19 SSO Success
17 HY5 25 December 2023
22:39[19]
Special converted barge (Bo Run Jiu Zhou)
South China Sea
Shiyan 24C-01
Shiyan 24C-02
Shiyan 24C-03
SSO Success

References

  1. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "CZ-11 (Chang Zheng-11)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  2. ^ "长征十一号固体运载火箭研制历程——继承,但不守旧". CASC (in Chinese).
  3. ^ a b c Barbosa, Rui C. (25 September 2015). "China debuts Long March 11 lofting Tianwang-1 trio". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b Barbosa, Rui C. (5 June 2019). "China conducts first Sea Launch mission with Long March 11 launch of seven satellites". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  5. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "XPNAV 1". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  6. ^ Barbosa, Rui C. (19 January 2018). "Long March 11 in multiple satellite launch". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  7. ^ Barbosa, Rui C. (26 April 2018). "Long March 11 launches multiple satellites". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  8. ^ Barbosa, Rui C. "Chinese Long March 11 launches with the first Hongyun satellite". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 21 December 2018.
  9. ^ "Long March 11 launches with three satellites – NASASpaceFlight.com". 21 January 2019. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  10. ^ Barbosa, Rui C. (19 September 2019). "Long March 11 lofts Zhuhai-1 Group-3 satellites". NASASpaceflight.com. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  11. ^ Clark, Stephen (1 June 2020). "Two Chinese launches deploy satellites for Earth-imaging, tech demonstrations". Spaceflight Now. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  12. ^ "China successfully launches satellites from ocean-going platform". Spaceflight Now. 17 September 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  13. ^ "China launches two satellites for gravitational wave detection". Hindustan Times. 10 December 2020. Retrieved 10 December 2020.
  14. ^ "China launches three satellites". Xinhua. 30 March 2022. Retrieved 30 March 2022.
  15. ^ "海上一箭打五星!长十一,成功!" [Five satellites with one rocket at sea! Long March 11, success!]. 30 April 2022. Retrieved 30 April 2022.
  16. ^ Jones, Andrew (7 October 2022). "China launches pair of navigation enhancement satellites from sea platform". Space.com. Retrieved 7 October 2022.
  17. ^ Jones, Andrew (16 December 2022). "China completes seventh space launch inside 10 days". SpaceNews. Retrieved 15 March 2023.
  18. ^ Jones, Andrew (15 March 2023). "China launches classified Shiyan-19 test satellite from the Gobi Desert". SpaceNews. Retrieved 15 March 2023.
  19. ^ "China launches 3 satellites from sea". Xinhua. 26 December 2023. Retrieved 26 December 2023.