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This is a list of conventional orbital launch systems. This is composed of launch vehicles, and other conventional systems, used to place satellites into orbit.

Argentina

Australia

Brazil

China

Several rockets of the Long March family
Several rockets of the Long March family
Long March 2F
Long March 2F

European Union

Ariane 5
Ariane 5

France

Germany

India

See also: Space industry of India

This list is incomplete; you can help by adding missing items. (June 2021)
(From left to right) ISRO's SLV, ASLV, PSLV, GSLV and GSLV Mk. III rockets
(From left to right) ISRO's SLV, ASLV, PSLV, GSLV and GSLV Mk. III rockets
ISRO/DoS systems
Private agencies

Indonesia

Iran

Simorgh SLV
Simorgh SLV

Iraq

Israel

Italy

Japan

Mu rockets
Mu rockets
H-II series
H-II series
Εpsilon

Malaysia

New Zealand

North Korea

Taiwan

Philippines

Romania

Soviet Union and successor states

Russia/USSR
Proton-K
Proton-K
Soyuz-FG
Soyuz-FG
Dnepr-1
Dnepr-1
Angara Family
Angara Family


Ukraine

South Africa

South Korea

Spain

Turkey

United Kingdom

United States

Main article: List of United States rockets

Active

Atlas rockets
Atlas rockets
Delta rockets
Delta rockets
Falcon rockets
Falcon rockets

Inactive

Comparison of Saturn V, Space Shuttle, three Ares rockets, and SLS Block 1
Comparison of Saturn V, Space Shuttle, three Ares rockets, and SLS Block 1
Titan rockets
Titan rockets

See also

References

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