Kroppkaka
Kroppkakor from Blekinge served with lingonberry-jam and butter
TypeDumpling
Place of originSweden, Eastern Denmark
Region or stateBlekinge, Gotland, Småland and Öland
Main ingredientsPotatoes, onions and pork, bacon, eel or seabird

Kroppkaka (plural "kroppkakor") is a traditional Swedish boiled potato dumplings. Filling of onions and pork or bacon. Potatoes, wheat flour, onion, salt and minced meat/pork are common ingredients in kroppkaka. They are very similar to the Norwegian raspeball, Lithuanian Cepelinai and German Klöße[1]

Kroppkakor are served with butter or half and half, lingonberry jam or White sauce. Fried unsmoked streaky bacon is also often eaten with it. There are some regional variations of the recipe, in particular when it comes to the proportions of boiled and raw potatoes. Spices are heavily featured in some variations. Kroppkakor are mainly eaten in the southern Swedish landskap (provinces) of Öland, Småland, Gotland and Blekinge.

The dish is very different in the different regions. In Blekinge the kroppkakor are called ”gray kroppkakor” and are made from almost only raw potatoes and only a tiny bit boiled potatoes are used. In Öland the kroppkakor are made from mostly raw potatoes and a little bit of boiled potatoes. In Småland the kroppkakor are made of mostly boiled potatoes and a little bit raw potatoes and in Gotland the kroppkakor are made of only boiled potatoes.

In Blekinge and Öland there are kroppkakor with different filling such as eel and seabirds that in the history was mostly eaten by the poor people since they got access to fish eel or hunt seabird. But the most common filling is pork.

A kroppkaka without filling is called ”Blinning”.

Kroppkakor comes from the south eastern area of Sweden, but in the northern Sweden there are a similar dish called Palt. Palt is made in a similar way but the ingredients differs a little such as what kind of flour and what kind of potatoes are used, which makes a big difference in taste from the kroppkakor.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kroppkakor". sweden.se. Retrieved December 1, 2019.