Tattnall County
Tattnall County Courthouse
Tattnall County Courthouse
Map of Georgia highlighting Tattnall County
Location within the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°02′N 82°04′W / 32.04°N 82.06°W / 32.04; -82.06
Country United States
State Georgia
FoundedDecember 5, 1801; 221 years ago (1801)
Named forJosiah Tattnall
SeatReidsville
Largest cityGlennville
Area
 • Total488 sq mi (1,260 km2)
 • Land479 sq mi (1,240 km2)
 • Water8.9 sq mi (23 km2)  1.8%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
25,391
 • Density53/sq mi (20/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district12th
Websitewww.tattnall.com

Tattnall County is a county located in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,520.[1] The county seat is Reidsville.[2] Tattnall County was created on December 5, 1801, from part of Montgomery County, Georgia by the Georgia General Assembly.[3] The county was named after Josiah Tattnall (1762–1803), a planter, soldier and politician.[4] It is located within the Magnolia Midlands, a part of the Historic South region.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 488 square miles (1,260 km2), of which 479 square miles (1,240 km2) is land and 8.9 square miles (23 km2) (1.8%) is water.[5]

Most of the western portion of Tattnall County, defined by a line running from Cobbtown south to Collins, then east to a point halfway to Bellville, and then south and southwest to the middle of the county's southern border, is located in the Ohoopee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin. The northeastern portion of the county, from Cobbtown to east of Reidsville, is located in the Canoochee River sub-basin of the Ogeechee River basin. The southeastern and southwestern parts of Tattnall County are located in the Altamaha River sub-basin of the larger river basin by the same name.[6]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18102,206
18202,64419.9%
18302,040−22.8%
18402,72433.5%
18503,22718.5%
18604,35234.9%
18704,86011.7%
18806,98843.8%
189010,25346.7%
190020,41999.2%
191018,569−9.1%
192014,502−21.9%
193015,4116.3%
194016,2435.4%
195015,939−1.9%
196015,837−0.6%
197016,5574.5%
198018,1349.5%
199017,722−2.3%
200022,30525.9%
201025,52014.4%
2018 (est.)25,391[7]−0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 22,305 people, 7,057 households, and 4,876 families living in the county. The population density was 46 people per square mile (18/km2). There were 8,578 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 60.51% White, 31.43% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 6.64% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 8.44% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,057 households, out of which 33.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.10% were married couples living together, 13.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 26.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.90% under the age of 18, 11.20% from 18 to 24, 34.60% from 25 to 44, 20.00% from 45 to 64, and 11.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 136.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 146.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,664, and the median income for a family was $35,951. Males had a median income of $28,994 versus $19,984 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,439. About 18.60% of families and 23.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.90% of those under age 18 and 20.20% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 25,520 people, 8,210 households, and 5,568 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 53.2 inhabitants per square mile (20.5/km2). There were 9,966 housing units at an average density of 20.8 per square mile (8.0/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 62.7% white, 29.3% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 6.0% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 9.8% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 12.9% were Irish, 6.6% were German, and 5.2% were American.[15]

Of the 8,210 households, 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.2% were non-families, and 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.07. The median age was 36.6 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $38,522 and the median income for a family was $45,601. Males had a median income of $35,240 versus $27,584 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,742. About 14.7% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.1% of those under age 18 and 11.9% of those age 65 or over.[16]

2020 census

Tattnall County racial composition[17]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 13,825 60.52%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 5,961 26.1%
Native American 36 0.16%
Asian 127 0.56%
Pacific Islander 6 0.03%
Other/Mixed 584 2.56%
Hispanic or Latino 2,303 10.08%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 22,842 people, 8,241 households, and 5,875 families residing in the county.

Government and infrastructure

Georgia State Prison

The Georgia Department of Corrections operates the Rogers State Prison, and formerly the Georgia State Prison in unincorporated Tattnall County,,[18] near Reidsville.[19] As of 2020, according to the Georgia State Prison Fact Sheet, the facility occupies 9,800 acres of land inside Tattnall County and provides 162 staff housing units on the reservation. The prison cemetery has 971 burials which are inmates who died while serving time from 1937 to present.

Another large government parcel of land is the 10,000 acre Big Hammock Wildlife Management Preserve in the southwest section of the county. The entrance is 12 miles south of Glennville on Hwy 144 at the Ohoopee River Bridge. This is controlled by the GA Department of Natural Resources under the Wildlife Resources Division. It has a shooting range and 2 boat ramps along the river which are north of the merger with the Altamaha River which forms the southern border of the county. Permits are issued for seasonal hunting of deer, turkey, and small game. Updates are posted at www.GoHuntGeorgia.com

Another large government land parcel is on the eastern side of Tattnall County along the border with Evans, Liberty, and Long Counties. This 6000+ acres forms the western side of the Fort Stewart Army Reservation which is based in Hinesville, GA. Originally this was farmland purchased by the Army during and after World War II. It has since been turned into forest land with no development. The current Ft. Stewart Land Use Development plan excludes any of this property in their 25-year future planning approved by the Department of Defense. This land mass can be viewed on Google Maps with additional info from the website for the Ft. Stewart Joint Land Use Study. (www.mrrpc.com/Misc_pdfs/Fort_Stewart_JLUS_Final_Report.pdf)

Politics

United States presidential election results for Tattnall County, Georgia[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 6,054 73.95% 2,062 25.19% 71 0.87%
2016 5,096 73.82% 1,681 24.35% 126 1.83%
2012 4,706 70.48% 1,897 28.41% 74 1.11%
2008 4,730 70.32% 1,932 28.72% 64 0.95%
2004 4,657 71.93% 1,787 27.60% 30 0.46%
2000 3,597 64.12% 1,963 34.99% 50 0.89%
1996 2,518 46.23% 2,369 43.49% 560 10.28%
1992 2,566 43.18% 2,360 39.72% 1016 17.10%
1988 3,172 65.03% 1,694 34.73% 12 0.25%
1984 3,641 65.08% 1,954 34.92% 0 0.00%
1980 2,082 41.62% 2,864 57.26% 56 1.12%
1976 1,326 27.16% 3,556 72.84% 0 0.00%
1972 2,892 85.46% 492 14.54% 0 0.00%
1968 852 16.34% 957 18.35% 3,405 65.30%
1964 3,264 66.45% 1,648 33.55% 0 0.00%
1960 869 31.29% 1,908 68.71% 0 0.00%
1956 440 18.96% 1,881 81.04% 0 0.00%
1952 1,114 31.41% 2,433 68.59% 0 0.00%
1948 216 11.59% 1,071 57.46% 577 30.95%
1944 494 28.91% 1,215 71.09% 0 0.00%
1940 421 25.15% 1,246 74.43% 7 0.42%
1936 214 16.82% 1,047 82.31% 11 0.86%
1932 37 1.70% 2,133 98.02% 6 0.28%
1928 791 63.23% 460 36.77% 0 0.00%
1924 66 5.02% 1,100 83.65% 149 11.33%
1920 301 40.24% 447 59.76% 0 0.00%
1916 200 24.30% 574 69.74% 49 5.95%
1912 243 28.49% 592 69.40% 18 2.11%


Communities

Cities

Census-designated place

Education

Tattnall County School District serves as the designated K-12 school district, except parts in Fort Stewart. Fort Stewart has the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) as its local school district,[21] for the elementary level.[22] Students at the secondary level on Fort Stewart attend public schools operated by county school districts.[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 17, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Tattnall County Historical Maps". Retrieved May 28, 2013.
  4. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 222. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved November 22, 2015.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  17. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  18. ^ "2020 CENSUS - CENSUS BLOCK MAP: Tattnall County, GA" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. p. 6 (PDF. p. 7/16). Retrieved August 13, 2022. Rogers State Prison [...] Georgia State Prison
  19. ^ "Georgia State Prison Archived 2008-03-05 at the Wayback Machine." Georgia Department of Corrections. Retrieved on September 14, 2010.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 22, 2018.
  21. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Tattnall County, GA" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 5, 2022. - text list - "Fort Stewart School District" refers to the DoDEA schools.
  22. ^ "Fort Stewart Schools". Department of Defense Education Activity. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  23. ^ "Fort Stewart Education". Military One Source. Retrieved July 5, 2022. - This is from a .mil website.

Coordinates: 32°02′N 82°04′W / 32.04°N 82.06°W / 32.04; -82.06