Quitman County
Quitman County Courthouse in Georgetown
Map of Georgia highlighting Quitman County
Location within the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 31°52′N 85°01′W / 31.86°N 85.01°W / 31.86; -85.01
Country United States
State Georgia
FoundedDecember 10, 1858; 166 years ago (1858)
Named forJohn A. Quitman
SeatGeorgetown
Largest cityGeorgetown
Area
 • Total161 sq mi (420 km2)
 • Land151 sq mi (390 km2)
 • Water9.3 sq mi (24 km2)  5.8%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total2,235
 • Density15/sq mi (6/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district2nd

Quitman County is a county located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 2,235,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Georgia. The county seat is Georgetown.[2] The county was created on December 10, 1858, and named after General John A. Quitman, leader in the Mexican–American War, and once Governor of Mississippi. In November 2006, residents voted to consolidate the city government of Georgetown and the county government of Quitman into a consolidated city-county.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 161 square miles (420 km2), of which 151 square miles (390 km2) is land and 9.3 square miles (24 km2) (5.8%) is water.[3] The entirety of Quitman County is located in the Middle Chattahoochee RiverWalter F. George Lake sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin).[4]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
18603,499
18704,15018.6%
18804,3925.8%
18904,4711.8%
19004,7015.1%
19104,594−2.3%
19203,417−25.6%
19303,82011.8%
19403,435−10.1%
19503,015−12.2%
19602,432−19.3%
19702,180−10.4%
19802,3578.1%
19902,209−6.3%
20002,59817.6%
20102,513−3.3%
20202,235−11.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1880[6]1890-1910[7]
1920-1930[8] 1930-1940[9]
1940-1950[10] 1960-1980[11]
1980-2000[12] 2010[13]

2000 census

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 2,598 people, 1,047 households, and 755 families living in the county. The population density was 7/km2 (18/sq mi). There were 1,773 housing units at an average density of 5/km2 (13/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 52.12% White, 46.88% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. 0.50% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,047 households, out of which 26.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.20% were married couples living together, 18.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were non-families. Of all households, 24.90% were made up of individuals, and 12.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.00% under the age of 18, 7.20% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 19.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 88.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,875, and the median income for a family was $30,691. Males had a median income of $23,365 versus $19,069 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,301. About 16.10% of families and 21.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.60% of those under age 18 and 24.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,513 people, 1,053 households, and 689 families living in the county.[15] The population density was 16.6 inhabitants per square mile (6.4/km2). There were 2,047 housing units at an average density of 13.5 per square mile (5.2/km2).[16] The racial makeup of the county was 51.3% white, 47.9% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 0.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.4% of the population.[15] In terms of ancestry, 12.8% were Irish, 10.0% were English, 6.1% were German, and 5.5% were American.[17]

Of the 1,053 households, 24.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.6% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.6% were non-families, and 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.98. The median age was 46.4 years.[15]

The median income for a household in the county was $28,912 and the median income for a family was $34,342. Males had a median income of $27,096 versus $22,331 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,642. About 21.2% of families and 31.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.4% of those under age 18 and 24.5% of those age 65 or over.[18]

2020 census

Quitman County Racial Composition[19]
Race Num. Perc.
White 1,190 53.24%
Black or African American 917 41.03%
Native American 13 0.58%
Asian 12 0.54%
Other/Mixed 72 3.22%
Hispanic or Latino 31 1.39%

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 2,235 people, 842 households, and 577 families residing in the county.

Education

Quitman County School District operates area public schools, including Quitman County High School.

County students attended Stewart-Quitman High School (now Stewart County High School) from 1978, until Quitman County High opened,[20] in 2009.[citation needed]

Communities

City

Unincorporated community

Politics

United States presidential election results for Quitman County, Georgia[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 604 54.61% 497 44.94% 5 0.45%
2016 575 55.08% 461 44.16% 8 0.77%
2012 510 45.21% 612 54.26% 6 0.53%
2008 509 45.61% 597 53.49% 10 0.90%
2004 409 42.38% 543 56.27% 13 1.35%
2000 348 38.50% 542 59.96% 14 1.55%
1996 224 28.11% 514 64.49% 59 7.40%
1992 284 30.80% 523 56.72% 115 12.47%
1988 296 40.11% 436 59.08% 6 0.81%
1984 361 42.42% 490 57.58% 0 0.00%
1980 240 28.67% 589 70.37% 8 0.96%
1976 313 31.62% 677 68.38% 0 0.00%
1972 502 78.19% 140 21.81% 0 0.00%
1968 90 12.05% 198 26.51% 459 61.45%
1964 377 62.11% 230 37.89% 0 0.00%
1960 67 14.73% 388 85.27% 0 0.00%
1956 31 8.03% 355 91.97% 0 0.00%
1952 93 21.88% 332 78.12% 0 0.00%
1948 19 5.26% 246 68.14% 96 26.59%
1944 16 4.31% 355 95.69% 0 0.00%
1940 19 5.54% 324 94.46% 0 0.00%
1936 19 5.08% 355 94.92% 0 0.00%
1932 0 0.00% 239 98.35% 4 1.65%
1928 41 19.07% 174 80.93% 0 0.00%
1924 8 5.33% 138 92.00% 4 2.67%
1920 4 2.88% 135 97.12% 0 0.00%
1916 15 10.56% 125 88.03% 2 1.41%
1912 7 4.27% 152 92.68% 5 3.05%

From the 1940s to 1960s Joe Hurst dominated politics in Quitman County, delivering votes for statewide officials, state judges, and prosecuting attorneys, under the County unit system which gave Quitman two units, a third as many as the biggest counties in the state. He hand-delivered state welfare checks and prevented secret ballots. In 1962 he stuffed the ballot box for future President Jimmy Carter's opponent in a state senate primary. Carter won a series of court cases to remove his Democratic primary opponent's name from the general election ballot. There was no Republican candidate. Both candidates used radio ads to ask voters to vote by write-in, and Carter won the general election. Hurst was later convicted of fraud in an earlier primary, for which he had a fine and three years probation. He was also convicted of selling moonshine, for which he went to prison.[22] [23]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Quitman County, Georgia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 28, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  4. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  5. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  6. ^ "1880 Census Population by Counties 1790-1800" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1880.
  7. ^ "1910 Census of Population - Georgia" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1910.
  8. ^ "1930 Census of Population - Georgia" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1930.
  9. ^ "1940 Census of Population - Georgia" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1940.
  10. ^ "1950 Census of Population - Georgia -" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1950.
  11. ^ "1980 Census of Population - Number of Inhabitants - Georgia" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 1980.
  12. ^ "2000 Census of Population - Population and Housing Unit Counts - Georgia" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2000.
  13. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved June 25, 2014.
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  15. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  16. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  17. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  18. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  19. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  20. ^ "Stewart - Quitman County High School is Splitting Up". WTVM. August 14, 2008. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 22, 2018.
  22. ^ Carter, Jimmy (1992). Turning point: a candidate, a state, and a nation come of age (1 ed.). New York: Times Books. pp. 74–204. ISBN 978-0-8129-2079-6.
  23. ^ Bourne, Peter G. (1997). Jimmy Carter: a comprehensive biography from Plains to postpresidency. New York: A Lisa Drew book Scribner. pp. 113–132. ISBN 978-0-684-19543-8.