Muscogee County
Columbus Consolidated Government Center
Columbus Consolidated Government Center
Map of Georgia highlighting Muscogee County
Location within the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°31′N 84°52′W / 32.51°N 84.87°W / 32.51; -84.87
Country United States
State Georgia
FoundedJune 9, 1826; 196 years ago (1826)
Named forMuscogee people
SeatColumbus
Largest cityColumbus
Area
 • Total221 sq mi (570 km2)
 • Land216 sq mi (560 km2)
 • Water4.6 sq mi (12 km2)  2.1%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
195,769
 • Density878/sq mi (339/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts2nd, 3rd
Websitewww.columbusga.org

Muscogee County is a county located on the central western border of the U.S. state of Georgia; its western border with the state of Alabama is formed by the Chattahoochee River. As of the 2010 census, the population was 189,885.[1] Its county seat and only city is Columbus,[2] with which it has been a consolidated city-county since the beginning of 1971.

Muscogee County is part of Columbus, GA-AL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The only other city in the county was Bibb City, a company town that disincorporated in December 2000, two years after its mill closed permanently. Fort Benning, a large Army installation, takes up nearly one quarter of the county and extends into Chattahoochee County; it generates considerable economic power in the region.

History

Inhabited for thousands of years by varying cultures of indigenous peoples, this area was territory of the historic Creek people at the time of European encounter.

The land for Lee, Muscogee, Troup, Coweta, and Carroll counties was ceded by a certain eight chiefs among the Creek people in the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs. The Creek Nation declared the land cession illegal, because it did not represent the will of the majority of the people. The United States Senate did not ratify it. The following year, the US government negotiated another treaty with the Creek, by which they ceded nearly as much territory under continued pressure from the state of Georgia and US land commissioners.

The counties' boundaries were created by the Georgia General Assembly on June 9, but they were not named until December 14 of 1826. The county was originally developed by American Indians for cotton plantations. In many areas of what became known as the Black Belt for the fertility of soil and development of plantations, American Indians who were reclassified by the government as Colored/Negro made up the majority of population in many counties.

This county was named by American Indians for the native Muscogee or Creek people. Parts of the then-large county (which extended east to the Flint River) were later taken to create every other neighboring Georgia county, including Harris County to the north in 1827.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 221 square miles (570 km2), of which 216 square miles (560 km2) is land and 4.6 square miles (12 km2) (2.1%) is water.[4]

The county is located on the fall line between the Atlantic coastal plain to the south and the Piedmont to the north. As such, the newly constructed Fall Line Freeway runs across the northern portion of the county along JR Allen Parkway, and areas across the northern part of the county are hillier compared to the southern part of the county.

The majority of Muscogee County, from north of Columbus running northeast in the direction of Ellerslie, is located in the Middle Chattahoochee River-Walter F. George Lake subbasin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin). The northwestern corner of the county, south of Fortson, is located in the Middle Chattahoochee River-Lake Harding subbasin of the same ACF River Basin.[5]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18303,508
184011,699233.5%
185018,57858.8%
186016,584−10.7%
187016,6630.5%
188019,32216.0%
189027,76143.7%
190029,8367.5%
191036,22721.4%
192044,19522.0%
193057,55830.2%
194075,49431.2%
1950118,02856.3%
1960158,62334.4%
1970167,3775.5%
1980170,1081.6%
1990179,2785.4%
2000186,2913.9%
2010189,8851.9%
2020206,9229.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2019[1]

2000 census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 186,291 people, 69,819 households, and 47,686 families living in the county. The population density was 861 people per square mile (333/km2). There were 76,182 housing units at an average density of 352 per square mile (136/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 50.42% White, 43.74% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 1.54% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 1.90% from other races, and 1.87% from two or more races. 4.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 69,819 households, out of which 34.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.70% were married couples living together, 19.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.70% were non-families. 26.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.80% under the age of 18, 11.90% from 18 to 24, 29.80% from 25 to 44, 19.70% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,798, and the median income for a family was $41,244. Males had a median income of $30,238 versus $24,336 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,262. 15.70% of the population and 12.80% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 22.00% of those under the age of 18 and 12.10% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 189,885 people, 74,081 households, and 47,742 families living in the county.[11] The population density was 877.5 inhabitants per square mile (338.8/km2). There were 82,690 housing units at an average density of 382.1 per square mile (147.5/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 46.3% white, 45.5% black or African American, 2.2% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.2% Pacific islander, 2.4% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 6.4% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 8.7% were Irish, 8.4% were German, 6.7% were English, and 6.3% were American.[13]

Of the 74,081 households, 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.3% were married couples living together, 21.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.6% were non-families, and 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age was 33.5 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $41,331 and the median income for a family was $50,771. Males had a median income of $37,618 versus $31,430 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,514. About 14.8% of families and 18.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.3% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.[14]

2020 census

Columbus racial composition[15]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 79,083 38.22%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 94,701 45.77%
Native American 488 0.24%
Asian 5,546 2.68%
Pacific Islander 517 0.25%
Other/Mixed 10,074 4.87%
Hispanic or Latino 16,513 7.98%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 206,922 people, 73,134 households, and 45,689 families residing in the city.

Education

Higher education

Public

Private

Primary and secondary education

Public schools

Main article: Muscogee County School District

Columbus is home to 65 public schools,[22] all operated by the Muscogee County School District.

Private and religion-based schools

Homeschooling

In regards to homeschooling, the Official Code of Georgia Annotated states the following:

Required Subjects: A basic academic educational program that includes, but is not limited to, reading, language arts, math, social studies, and science. [Ga. Code Ann. § 20-2-690(c)(4).]

Communities

Cities

Former incorporated communities

Government and politics

See also: Columbus, Georgia § Law and government

Muscogee County has voted for Democratic candidates by increasing margins since 1992, although partisan leanings have become increasingly stratified by race, class, and in-county migration after 1965. The county has not supported a Republican for president since 1988, but broke free of Solid South voting patterns earlier than most counties in Georgia.

Presidential

United States presidential election results for Muscogee County, Georgia[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 30,107 37.39% 49,446 61.41% 961 1.19%
2016 26,976 38.80% 39,851 57.32% 2,698 3.88%
2012 27,510 38.90% 42,573 60.20% 632 0.89%
2008 29,568 39.87% 44,158 59.54% 436 0.59%
2004 30,850 48.16% 32,867 51.31% 335 0.52%
2000 23,479 45.01% 28,193 54.05% 491 0.94%
1996 19,360 41.86% 24,867 53.77% 2021 4.37%
1992 21,386 41.70% 25,476 49.68% 4418 8.62%
1988 23,058 54.90% 18,772 44.70% 170 0.40%
1984 23,816 53.34% 20,835 46.66% 0 0.00%
1980 15,203 38.42% 23,272 58.82% 1091 2.76%
1976 13,496 35.91% 24,092 64.09% 0 0.00%
1972 28,449 77.55% 8,234 22.45% 0 0.00%
1968 11,193 32.36% 7593 21.95% 15,804 45.69%
1964 21,025 62.81% 12,446 37.18% 3 0.01%
1960 9,578 52.83% 8,553 47.17% 0 0.00%
1956 8,176 50.05% 8,160 49.95% 0 0.00%
1952 7,814 41.05% 11,220 58.95% 0 0.00%
1948 2,443 23.94% 5,920 58.02% 1,840 18.03%
1944 1,344 17.14% 6,498 82.86% 0 0.00%
1940 702 11.51% 5,392 88.38% 7 0.11%
1936 455 8.32% 5,009 91.56% 7 0.13%
1932 230 6.27% 3,413 93.07% 24 0.65%
1928 1,574 42.86% 2,098 57.14% 0 0.00%
1924 218 9.03% 2,067 85.59% 130 5.38%
1920 101 6.86% 1,372 93.14% 0 0.00%
1916 44 2.21% 1,833 92.25% 110 5.54%
1912 102 5.18% 1,817 92.23% 51 2.59%
1908 459 20.94% 1,599 72.95% 134 6.11%
1904 164 9.51% 1,522 88.28% 38 2.20%
1900 272 17.89% 1,245 81.91% 3 0.20%
1896 501 25.06% 1,365 68.28% 133 6.65%
1892 540 20.35% 2,062 77.69% 52 1.96%
1888 611 35.24% 1,107 63.84% 16 0.92%
1884 590 23.22% 1,951 76.78% 0 0.00%
1880 930 38.10% 1,511 61.90% 0 0.00%


United States Congress

Senators Name Party Assumed Office Level
  Senate Class 2 Jon Ossoff Democratic 2021 Senior Senator
  Senate Class 3 Raphael Warnock Democratic 2021 Junior Senator
Representatives Name Party Assumed Office
  District 2 Sanford Bishop Democratic 1993
  District 3 Drew Ferguson Republican 2015

Georgia General Assembly

Georgia State Senate

District Name Party Assumed Office
  15 Ed Harbison Democratic 2013
  29 Joshua McKoon Republican 2011

Georgia House of Representatives

District Name Party Assumed Office
  133 John Pezold Republican 2013
  134 Richard H. Smith Republican 2005
  135 Calvin Smyre Democratic 1975
  136 Carolyn Hugley Democratic 1993
  137 Debbie Buckner Democratic 2003

[24][25][26]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 3, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Muscogee County History" Archived 2005-04-02 at the Wayback Machine, University of Georgia
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved November 22, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  15. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 12, 2021.
  16. ^ www.thirdwavedigital.com, Third Wave Digital -. "Home - Columbus Technical College". www.columbustech.edu. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  17. ^ Troy University at Columbus Archived 2010-01-31 at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ Beacon University Archived 2009-06-13 at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ "Rivertown School of Beauty". www.rivertownschoolofbeauty.com. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  20. ^ "Southeastern Beauty School". Archived from the original on June 1, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2009.
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. Retrieved September 21, 2009.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  22. ^ List of schools in Columbus Archived 2010-01-24 at the Wayback Machine, Retrieved Sept. 2009
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 22, 2018.
  24. ^ "House Members List". Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  25. ^ "Senate Members List". Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  26. ^ "Georgia Counties by 2012 Legislative and Congressional District" (PDF). Retrieved June 2, 2016.

Coordinates: 32°31′N 84°52′W / 32.51°N 84.87°W / 32.51; -84.87