WKQQ
Broadcast areaLexington metropolitan area
Frequency100.1 MHz (HD Radio)
Branding100.1 WKQQ
Programming
FormatClassic rock
SubchannelsHD2: Blues
AffiliationsWestwood One
Ownership
Owner
WBUL-FM, WLAP, WLKT, WMXL, WWTF
History
First air date
October 2, 1974; 49 years ago (1974-10-02)
Former call signs
  • WKDJ (1974–1981)
  • WFMI (1981–1989)
  • WLFX (1989–1992)
  • WHRS-FM (1992–1993)
  • WWYC (1993–1998)[1]
Technical information[2]
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID68206
ClassC2
ERP20,000 watts
HAAT194 meters (636 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
38°07′24″N 84°26′37″W / 38.12333°N 84.44361°W / 38.12333; -84.44361
Links
Public license information
WebcastListen Live
HD2: Listen Live
Websitewkqq.iheart.com

WKQQ (100.1 FM) is a radio station licensed to the city of Winchester, Kentucky, serving Lexington and the greater Central Kentucky area. The station is owned by iHeartMedia and airs a classic rock format.[3]

WKQQ has an effective radiated power (ERP) of 20,000 watts. The transmitter is on Russell Cave Road near Huffman Mill Pike, amid the towers for other Lexington-area FM and TV stations.[4] The studios and offices are on Main Street in Lexington.

History

WKDJ began broadcasting from Winchester on October 2, 1974.[5] It was originally owned by Clark Communications Company, a business of David Greenlee.[6]

WKDJ left the air in December 1980. Its country music format was replaced in late February 1981 by WFMI, owned by the Cromwell Group and featuring Top 40 music.[7][8] WFMI and WHRS (1380 AM) were then sold to Premier Broadcast Corporation of Albany, New York, in 1988.[9] Coinciding with a planned power increase from 3,000 to 50,000 watts, the station switched to classic rock in February 1989 and rebranded as WLFX "Fox 100".[10]

Premier placed itself in receivership in 1991. Hancock Communications of Nashville acquired the pair the next year with plans to sell both facilities to other companies: while buyers were lined up for both stations, WLFX began simulcasting WHRS and its new soft adult contemporary format.[11] As a result of the sale action, the 100.1 station changed hands in rapid succession, being purchased by Trumper Communications in 1993. Trumper relocated the transmitter facility to Lexington,[12] and upon taking over, the format was changed to country as "Young Country" WWYC, competing with market leader WVLK-FM.[13]

Trumper Communications's three-station Lexington cluster was acquired by Jacor in 1996.[14]

In 1998, Jacor effectuated a format swap between two of its stations. The country music format on WWYC was moved to 98.1, where it was relaunched as WBUL-FM "The Bull", while WKQQ's call sign and programming moved to 100.1 MHz.[15] The station has been assigned these call letters by the Federal Communications Commission since February 4, 1998.[1] Later that year, Jacor was purchased by Clear Channel Communications (forerunner to iHeartMedia) for $2.8 billion.[16]

References

  1. ^ a b "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database.
  2. ^ "Facility Technical Data for WKQQ". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  3. ^ "Winter 2008 Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Archived from the original on June 12, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2008.
  4. ^ Radio-Locator.com/WKQQ
  5. ^ Robertson, John (November 24, 1974). "Newest Station Middle-Of-Road: Format Of Radio Programs Is Moving With The Times". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. E-7. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ FCC History Cards for WKQQ
  7. ^ Green, Gail (January 30, 1981). "New-format Winchester station to enter 'under-radioed' market". The Lexington Leader. p. B-6. Archived from the original on December 14, 2022. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Reed, David (February 20, 1981). "There's a New FM Radio Signal Floating on Local FM Airwaves". The Lexington Herald. p. B-11. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Duke, Jacqueline (December 10, 1988). "N.Y. company buys 2 area radio stations: WFMI, WHRS will not undergo major program changes". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. C9. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Poindexter, Marshall (February 13, 1989). "Radio station's new name, format herald other changes". Lexington Herald-Leader. pp. B1, B11. Archived from the original on December 14, 2022. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Jordan, Jim (November 3, 1992). "2 Winchester stations split up, will be sold". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. C6. Archived from the original on December 14, 2022. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Schultz, Ted (January 23, 1993). "Sale to move WHRS radio station to Lexington". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. A9. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Business in Brief". Lexington Herald-Leader. February 19, 1993. p. C7. Archived from the original on December 14, 2022. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Isaacs, Barbara (June 19, 1996). "Lexington radio stations to be bought". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. B1, B5. Archived from the original on December 14, 2022. Retrieved December 14, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Svokos, Heather (January 10, 1998). "WKQQ moves up dial, makes way for Garth". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. Home & Garden 2. Archived from the original on December 13, 2022. Retrieved December 13, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Myerson, Allen (October 9, 1998). "THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Clear Channel to Buy Jacor For $2.8 Billion in Stock". New York Times.