Baghrir
Beghrir (Homemade).jpg
TypePancake
Region or stateMaghreb
Associated national cuisine
Main ingredientsSemolina, often raisins

Baghrir[1] or beghrir (Arabic:البغرير), also known as ghrayef or mchahda, is a pancake consumed in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia.[2] They are small, spongy, and made with semolina or flour; when cooked correctly, they are riddled with tiny holes (which soak up whatever sauce they are served with). The most common way to eat baghrir in Algeria and Morocco is by dipping them in a honey-butter mixture,[3] but they can also be cut into wedges and served with jam. It is common to add raisins to the pancake as well. Baghrir is popular for breakfast, as a snack, and for iftar during Ramadan.[4] On the 9th day of Ramadan, the Mozabite people of Algeria exchange baghrir as a form of tradition, which they call m'layin; they are also distributed to the poor.[5]

Etymology

In the Maghreb, this type of pancake is also known under other names: gh'rayf, in Tunisia and eastern Algeria (Constantine, Collo, Skikda), kh'ringu in Morocco and Algeria, [grifa, gh'rayf]; [m'layn, s. m'layna]; [gh’rayf]; [gh’rayf]; [kh’ringu, kh’ringu]; [khringu] in Algeria.[6][7][8] This lexical diversity undoubtedly denotes a rich and ancient regional tradition. As for the word baghrir, it seems to be typical of Maghrebi-Western Arabic dialects (Morocco, Algeria), in any case it is unknown to us elsewhere. The lexicographer Mohamed Sbihi considers, in his Mu'djam, that the word baghrir is in some way an alteration of the Arabic baghir of the verb baghara; the baghir, according to the classic Arabic dictionaries, is the one who drinks without being able to quench his thirst (generally said of an animal). It is possible that the word was used in this case by allusion to the great absorbability of these pancakes, which have holes like a sponge.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Berber, Casey (May 27, 2019). "Breakfast food around the world". CNN Travel. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  2. ^ Oubahli, Mohamed (2008). "Le banquet d'Ibn 'Ali Masfiwi, lexique, notes et commentaires. Approche historique et anthropologique". Horizons Maghrébins - le droit à la mémoire. 59 (1): 123. doi:10.3406/horma.2008.2682.
  3. ^ Ken Albala (2011). Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-313-37626-9.
  4. ^ "Moroccan Baghrir". Moroccan World News. September 18, 2019.
  5. ^ M, D. S. (1928). "La Vie Féminine au Mzab: Étude de Sociologie Musulmane. By A. M. Goichon. Paris: Geuthner, 1927". Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 60 (4): 964–965. doi:10.1017/S0035869X00162094. ISSN 1474-0591. S2CID 178647382.
  6. ^ Amelie Marie Goichon (2017-05-05). La Vie Feminine Au Mzab Tome 01.
  7. ^ Hadjiat, Salima (1983). La cuisine d'Algérie = [Fann al-ṭabkh fī al-Jazāʼir]. [Privas]: Publisud. ISBN 2-86600-056-0. OCLC 11261743.
  8. ^ Bouayed, Fatima-Zohra (1983). La cuisine algérienne. Paris: Messidor/Temps actuels. ISBN 2-201-01648-8. OCLC 11290460.
  9. ^ Oubahli, Mohamed (2008). "Le banquet d'Ibn 'Ali Masfiwi, lexique, notes et commentaires. Approche historique et anthropologique". Horizons Maghrébins - le droit à la mémoire. 59 (1): 114–145. doi:10.3406/horma.2008.2682.