Varieties of suya
Varieties of suya
Location of Nigeria
Location of Nigeria
A yam pottage/porridge dish
A yam pottage/porridge dish

Nigerian cuisine consists of dishes or food items from the hundreds of ethnic groups that comprise Nigeria. Like other West African cuisines, it uses spices and herbs with palm or groundnut oil to create deeply flavored sauces and soups.

Nigerian feasts are colourful and lavish, while aromatic market and roadside snacks cooked on barbecues or fried in oil are in abundance and varied.[1] Bushmeat is also consumed in Nigeria. The brush-tailed porcupine and cane rats are the most popular bushmeat species in Nigeria.[2]

Tropical fruits such as pineapple, coconut, banana, and mango are mostly consumed in Nigeria.[3]

Nigerian cuisine, like many West African cuisines, is known for being spicy.

History

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (July 2021)

Entrees

Rice-Based

Bean-based

Meat

Woman selling ponmo (cow skin).
Woman selling ponmo (cow skin).

Meat is used in most Nigerian dishes.

Soups and stews

Maafe
Ofada rice served in traditional style with fried plantain and beef
Ofada rice served in traditional style with fried plantain and beef

Side dishes

Dodo (fried plantain)
Dodo (fried plantain)

Puddings, pastes and porridges

Yam-based

A plate of pounded yam (iyan) and egusi with tomato stew
A plate of pounded yam (iyan) and egusi with tomato stew

Cassava-based

Breakfast

Snacks

Beverages

Zobo
Zobo

See also

References

  1. ^ H.O. Anthonio & M. Isoun: "Nigerian Cookbook." Macmillan, Lagos, 1982.
  2. ^ Jori, F.; Edderai, D.; Houben, Patrick; Paoletti, M. (7 January 2005). "Potential of Rodents for Minilivestock in Africa". Ecological Implications of Minilivestock. CRC Press. pp. 39–60. doi:10.1201/9781482294439-9. ISBN 9780429078590.
  3. ^ Oktay, Serdar; Sadıkoğlu, Saide (June 2018). "The gastronomic cultures' impact on the African cuisine". Journal of Ethnic Foods. 5 (2): 140–146. doi:10.1016/j.jef.2018.02.005.
  4. ^ "How To Prepare Banga Rice". whatsdalatest.com.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Hudgens, Jim (2004). Rough Guide to West Africa. City: Rough Guides Limited. p. 1007. ISBN 1-84353-118-6.
  6. ^ The Epicentre. "Tsire: Tsire spice powder".
  7. ^ Okafor, C. (2014, April 14). Popularising African Delicacies. Realnews Magazine.
  8. ^ Nkewa, Guylene. "Asun (Spicy Roast Goat) By Sisi Jemimah". African Vibes Magazine. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  9. ^ "Banga Soup (Ofe Akwu)". All Nigerian Recipes. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  10. ^ "Look at good pictures of Nigerian dishes". news-af.feednews.com. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  11. ^ "Best Clay Mix Nigeria". www.ilfornaioecologico.it. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  12. ^ "Ofe Owerri". All Nigerian Recipes. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  13. ^ "Fried yam (Dundun) and fried sauce". My Active Kitchen. 2015-04-10. Retrieved 2020-05-08.