Goan cuisine consists of regional foods popular in Goa, an Indian state located along India's west coast on the shore of the Arabian Sea. Rice, seafood, coconut, vegetables, meat, bread, pork and local spices are some of the main ingredients in Goan cuisine. Use of kokum and vinegar is another distinct feature. Goan food is considered incomplete without fish.

The cuisine of Goa originated from its Konkani roots, and was influenced by the 451 years of Portuguese rule and the Sultanate rule that preceded the Portuguese.[1] Many Catholic dishes are either similar to or variants of their Portuguese counterparts in both naming or their use of ingredients.

Seafood

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Goan prawn curry, a popular dish throughout the state.
Goan prawn curry, a popular dish throughout the state.

The cuisine of Goan people is mostly seafood-based; the staple foods are rice and fish. Kingfish (vison or visvan) is one of the most commonly eaten varieties of fish.. Other fish varieties include pomfret, shark, tuna, sardines, and mackerel. Among the shellfish are crabs, prawns, tiger prawns, lobster, squid, and mussels. The food of Goan Christians is heavily influenced by the Portuguese. The use of vinegar, for example, is very prominent, specifically toddy vinegar, which is made from coconut sap that is retrieved from stems, and is then left to ferment for four to six months.[2]

Introduction of new foods

The Portuguese introduced potatoes, tomatoes, pineapples, guavas, and cashews from Brazil to Goa and consequently India. The chili pepper is the most important aspect of Goan cuisine; it was introduced by the Portuguese and became immensely popular as a very important spice for wider Indian cuisine. The Portuguese also introduced beef and pork, meats that were and still are considered a taboo by Hindus of Goa.[3] These two ingredients make up one of the national Goan dishes called sorpotel, which is made from beef and pork. Sorpotel is one of many dishes that allow Goans to distinguish themselves from Hindus, who do not eat beef, and Muslims, who do not eat pork.[4]

Goan Hindu cuisine

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Goan Hindu cuisine in Goa is mainly pescetarian and lacto-vegetarian and is very similar to Saraswat cuisine, from which it originates. Goan Hindu cuisine is mild, with use of tamarind and kokum for souring, and jaggery for sweetening. It uses spices such as asafoetida, fenugreek, curry leaves, mustard, and urad dal. Onion and garlic are also used. It also includes vegetables, such as lentils, pumpkins, gourds, bamboo shoots, and roots. The medium of cooking is coconut oil.

Popular Goan Hindu dishes include:

Goan Catholic cuisine

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Pork vindaloo is a popular Goan curry dish in the state and around the world.
Pork vindaloo is a popular Goan curry dish in the state and around the world.

Main article: Goan Catholic cuisine

Goan Catholic cuisine in Goa is a fusion of Goan Hindu and Portuguese cooking styles. Vinegar (made from the toddy of local coconut trees) is used to give the zingy taste to the meat dishes.

Main dishes

Popular Goan Catholic dishes include:

Sweets and desserts

Sweets and desserts are known by their Konkani name, Godshem. Popular dishes include:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Goa and its cuisine". The Times Of India. 3 April 2008.
  2. ^ Ihsan, Aqeel. ‘“I’m Goan Because I Eat Goan Food”: A Critical Look at the History of Goan Canadians’. The Graduate History Review 10, no. 1 (20 September 2021): 51. https://doi.org/10.18357/ghr101202120028.
  3. ^ Chapman, Pat (2009). India: Food & Cooking: The Ultimate Book on Indian Cuisine. New Holland Publishers. p. 256. ISBN 978-1845376192.
  4. ^ Ihsan, 42.
  5. ^ "Cricket News, Latest Cricket News Today, Live Cricket Score, Live Score Online Updates".