Argentina

See also: Argentine cuisine

Vitello tonnato is a popular Christmas dish in Argentina, where it is known as vitel toné. The Piedmontese dish is valued during the summer for its cold serving temperature, and is the legacy of the large Italian immigration to the country.[1]

Panettone (known locally as pan dulce) and turrón are the most popular Christmas sweets in Argentina regardless of socioeconomic status, with 76% of Argentines choosing the former and 59% the latter in 2015.[2] Mantecol, a typical peanut dessert, is also popular, being favored by 49% of Argentines in the same survey.[3] Sparkling wines, ciders and frizzantes concentrate most of their sales during Christmas season; sparkling wine is mostly consumed by small families with high and medium socioeconomic status living in Greater Buenos Aires and the country's largest cities, while cider and frizzantes are popular among lower classes and large families.[3]

Australia

Candy Cane can be hung as edible decorations.

Bangladesh

See also: Bengali cuisine and Bangladeshi cuisine

Belarus

Belgium

Brazil

Panettone

Canada

Gingerbread house

Chile

Pan de pascua

China and Taiwan

Colombia

Colombian Buñuelos
Colombian natilla

Colombian Christmas dishes are mostly sweets and desserts. Some of the most popular dishes include:

Cuba

Czech Republic and Slovakia

Christmas cookies (vánoční cukroví)

Before the Christmas holidays, many kinds of sweet biscuits are prepared. These sweet biscuits are then served during the whole Christmas period and exchanged among friends and neighbours. Also very popular are a preparation of small gingerbreads garnished by sugar icing.

Denmark

Danish Christmas meal

Main article: Danish cuisine

Dominican Republic

Drinks:

Desserts:

Finland

Main article: Cuisine of Finland

A Karelian pasty
Mulled wine

Christmas smorgasbord from Finland, "Joulupöytä", (translated "Yule table"), a traditional display of Christmas food[27] served at Christmas in Finland, similar to the Swedish smörgåsbord, including:

Other meat dishes could be:

Desserts:

Drinks:

France

Foie gras en cocotte
Kouglof

Germany

A Christmas Stollen

Greece and Cyprus

Greenland

Guatemala

Haiti

Hong Kong and Macau

Hungary

Töltött káposzta

Iceland

Möndlugrautur

India

Indian Christians in Indian subcontinent celebrate Christmas by enjoying several dishes, such as Allahabadi cake, Candy canes, Plum cakes etc. Some of the popular dishes eaten during Christmas in India are:

Church services are also held in churches throughout India, in which Christmas dinners are held which include dishes such as Allahabadi cake, candy canes, christmas cookies.

The Koswad is a set of sweets and snacks prepared in the Christmastide by people of the Konkan region. South Indian states such as Kerala have traditions observed of home-brewed wine, mostly grapes but sometimes other fruits as well like Apple & Rose Apple; ethnic recipes of slow-cooked beef fry, Rice & Coconut Hoppers, Lamb stew, Fried Rice Indian and Fusion Style; Desserts such as Falooda, pastry, and a whole array of steamed, boiled or baked sweets, often with coconut, jaggery, sugar and spices such as cardamom & cloves (Achappam, Murukku, Tapioca chip, Sukiyan, Neyyappam).

Indonesia

Israel and Palestine

Italy

Main article: Christmas in Italy

See also: Italian cuisine and List of Italian dishes

Panettone
Cappelletti
Abbacchio
Struffoli

According to tradition, the Christmas Eve dinner must not contain meat. A popular Christmas Day dish in Naples and in Southern Italy is female eel or capitone, which is a female eel. A traditional Christmas Day dish from Northern Italy is capon (gelded chicken). Abbacchio is more common in Central Italy.[40] The Christmas Day dinner traditionally consists by typical Italian Christmas dishes, such as abbacchio, agnolini, cappelletti, Pavese agnolotti, panettone, pandoro, torrone, panforte, struffoli, mustacciuoli, bisciola, cavallucci, veneziana, pizzelle, zelten, or others, depending on the regional cuisine.[41] Christmas on 25 December is celebrated with a family lunch, also consisting of different types of pasta and meat dishes, cheese and local sweets.

Jamaica

Japan

Korea

Lithuania

Malaysia

Malta

Mexico

Christmas roast

Netherlands

New Zealand

A homemade Christmas pavlova decorated with pomegranate seeds and Chantilly cream.

Norway

Scandinavian-style gingerbread

Panama

Paraguay

Philippines

Large bibingka from the Philippines

Poland

On 24 December, Christmas Eve, twelve dishes are served as a reminder of the Twelve Apostles. Polish people often do not eat meat on this day; instead, they choose from a variety of fish and vegetable dishes. The meal begins when the first star is seen.

Barszcz with Uszka
Makowiec

Portugal

Bolo-Rei

Puerto Rico (U.S.)

Drinks:

Dessert:

Romania

Cozonac

Romanian Christmas foods are mostly pork-based dishes.[58] Five days before Christmas, Romanians are celebrating the Ignat Day, a religious holy day dedicated to the Holy Martyr Ignatius Theophorus, associated with a practice that takes place especially on villages scattered around the country: the ritual of slaughtering the pigs. And they are using everything from the pigs: from their blood to their ears. Five days later their tables are filled not only with generous pork roasts but also with:

Russia

Samoa, Tonga and Tuvalu

San Marino

Bustrengo

Serbia

Main article: Serbian cuisine

South Africa

Christmas is in the summer in South Africa, so many summer fruits such as watermelon and cantaloupes are enjoyed at this time. Popular desserts include trifle, melktert and peppermint crisp tart. Many people in South Africa hold Braai barbecues for Christmas or New Year's Day.

Spain

Sweden

Julbord Christmas dinner in Sweden

Trinidad and Tobago

In Trinidad and Tobago traditional meals consists of generous helpings of baked ham, pastelles, black fruit cake, sweet breads, along with traditional drinks such as sorrel, ginger beer, and ponche de crème. The ham is the main item on the Christmas menu with sorrel to accompany it.[65][66]

Ukraine

Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christians in Ukraine traditionally have two Christmas dinners. The first is a Lent Dinner, it is held on the January 6 and should consist of meatless dishes. The second is a Christmas Festive dinner held on January 7, when the meat dishes and alcohol are already allowed on the table. The dinner normally has 12 dishes which represent Jesus's 12 disciples. Both Christmas dinners traditionally include a number of authentic Ukrainian dishes, which have over thousand-year history and date back to pagan times.

United Kingdom

Main article: British cuisine

Christmas pudding

In the United Kingdom, what is now regarded as the traditional meal consists of roast turkey with cranberry sauce, served with roast potatoes and parsnips and other vegetables, followed by Christmas pudding, a heavy steamed pudding made with dried fruit, suet, and very little flour. Other roast meats may be served, and in the nineteenth century the traditional roast was goose. The same carries over to Ireland with some variations.

United States

Roast turkey
Christmas ham

See also: Thanksgiving (the dishes tend to be similar)

Venezuela

Hallaca

Vietnam

See also

References

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