Ingredients being used in the preparation of a plum chutney
Ingredients being used in the preparation of a plum chutney
Fresh coconut chutney

This is a list of notable chutney varieties. Chutney is a sauce and condiment in Indian cuisine, the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent and South Asian cuisine. It is made from a highly variable mixture of spices, vegetables, or fruit.[1] Chutney originated in India, and is similar in preparation and usage to a pickle.[1][2] In contemporary times, chutneys and pickles are a mass-produced food product.

Chutneys

This list is incomplete; you can help by adding missing items. (October 2020)
Mint chutney (left), Saunth chutney (right), yogurt (top) and aloo tikki (bottom)
Mint chutney (left), Saunth chutney (right), yogurt (top) and aloo tikki (bottom)

Gallery

See also

References

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  13. ^ Gopal, Sena Desai (June 19, 2017). "Recipe for Coconut-garlic Chutney". The Boston Globe. Retrieved October 26, 2017.
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  18. ^ Kitchen, Archana's. "Sweet & Spicy Amla Chutney Recipe". Archana's Kitchen. Retrieved 2020-07-29.
  19. ^ "Hog plum chutney, Ambate kayi chutney". udupi-recipes.com. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  20. ^ "Chutney Origins". FoodReference.com. Retrieved 2017-01-14.
  21. ^ Carpender, D. (2004). 500 More Low-Carb Recipes. Fair Winds Press. p. 442. ISBN 978-1-61673-783-2. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
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  23. ^ Scott, L. (2012). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Sugar-Free Cooking and Baking. DK Publishing. p. 68. ISBN 978-1-101-58577-1. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
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  26. ^ Nair, Pradeepa (2019-09-06). "Mango Ginger Chutney". Culinary Labs. Retrieved 2020-07-29.
  27. ^ "Bengali Plastic Chutney - Sweet Raw Papaya Chutney | Food Indian". foodindian.org. Retrieved 2020-07-07.
  28. ^ "Pineapple chutney". BBC Good Food. Retrieved 2020-07-30.
  29. ^ Prasad, V. (2011). Indian Vegetarian Cooking from an American Kitchen. Random House Publishing Group. p. pt25. ISBN 978-0-307-87439-9. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  30. ^ "Ridge Gourd Chutney without Coconut". udupi-recipes.com. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  31. ^ "Imli (Tamarind) Saunth (Dried Ginger) Chutney conserve Recipe". Indiacurry.com. Retrieved 17 May 2012.
  32. ^ vikas, m. "5 Best Chutney Recipes That Can Make Your Food & Snacks Tasty". bestindianrecipesfood.blogspot.com/. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
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  35. ^ a b Treasury Decisions Under the Customs, Internal Revenue, and Other Laws: Including the Decisions of the Board of General Appraisers and the Court of Customs Appeals. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1910. p. 4. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  36. ^ "El Paso Herald from El Paso, Texas on March 19, 1897". El Paso Herald. p. 4. Retrieved October 27, 2017.