Calhoun County
Calhoun County Courthouse in Blountstown
Calhoun County Courthouse in Blountstown
Map of Florida highlighting Calhoun County
Location within the U.S. state of Florida
Map of the United States highlighting Florida
Florida's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 30°25′N 85°12′W / 30.41°N 85.2°W / 30.41; -85.2
Country United States
State Florida
FoundedJanuary 26, 1838
Named forJohn C. Calhoun
SeatBlountstown
Largest cityBlountstown
Area
 • Total574 sq mi (1,490 km2)
 • Land567 sq mi (1,470 km2)
 • Water7.0 sq mi (18 km2)  1.22 %%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
13,648[1]
 • Density25.5/sq mi (9.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitecalhouncountygov.com

Calhoun County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. As of the 2020 census, the population was 13,648,[2] making it the fifth-least populous county in Florida. Its county seat is Blountstown.[3]

History

Map of Calhoun County, Florida, in 1842
Map of Calhoun County, Florida, in 1842

Calhoun County was created in 1838. It was named for John C. Calhoun, member of the United States Senate from South Carolina and the seventh U.S. vice president, serving under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson.[4] The County originally was located between St. Joseph Bay and the Apalachicola River, with the county seat at St. Joseph (which was abandoned by 1844). The county was later expanded to the north with territory from Jackson and Washington counties. In 1913, part of Calhoun County was transferred to the new Bay County. In 1925, the southern part of Calhoun County was separated as the new Gulf County, which included the territory that had formed the original Calhoun County.[5]

In 1930, a federal employee shot the County Sheriff over a dispute of unknown origin.[6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 574 square miles (1,490 km2), of which 567 square miles (1,470 km2) is land and 7.0 square miles (18 km2) (1.2%) is water.[7] The county is bounded on the east by the Apalachicola River and is bisected by the Chipola River, site of Look and Tremble.

Unincorporated areas

Among the unincorporated settlements are Broad Beach, Chipola, Clarksville, Chason, Durham, Fisher Corner, Flowers Still, Henderson Mill, Kinard, Leonards, New Hope, Rollins Corner, Selman, Sharptown, Summerville, and Willis. [8][9]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18401,142
18501,37720.6%
18601,4465.0%
1870998−31.0%
18801,58058.3%
18901,6816.4%
19005,132205.3%
19107,46545.5%
19208,77517.5%
19307,298−16.8%
19408,21812.6%
19507,922−3.6%
19607,422−6.3%
19707,6242.7%
19809,29421.9%
199011,01118.5%
200013,01718.2%
201014,62512.4%
202013,648−6.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790–1960[11] 1900–1990[12]
1990–2000[13] 2010–2015[14] 2020[2]
Calhoun County racial composition as of 2020
(NH = Non-Hispanic)[a]
Race Pop 2010[17] Pop 2020[18] % 2010 % 2020
White (NH) 11,357 10,490 77.65% 76.86%
Black or African American (NH) 1,991 1,668 13.61% 12.22%
Native American or Alaska Native (NH) 144 93 0.98% 0.68%
Asian (NH) 71 46 0.49% 0.34%
Pacific Islander (NH) 8 0 0.05% 0.0%
Some Other Race (NH) 6 10 0.04% 0.07%
Mixed/Multi-Racial (NH) 293 719 2.0% 5.27%
Hispanic or Latino 755 622 5.16% 4.56%
Total 14,625 13,648 100.00% 100.00%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 13,648 people, 4,510 households, and 2,753 families residing in the county.

As of the census[19] of 2000, there were 13,017 people, 4,468 households, and 3,132 families residing in the county. The population density was 23 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 5,250 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (4/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 79.87% White, 15.79% Black or African American, 1.26% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. 3.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,468 households, out of which 32.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.30% were married couples living together, 13.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.20% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 117.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 120.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,575, and the median income for a family was $32,848. Males had a median income of $26,681 versus $21,176 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,379. About 14.80% of families and 20.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.60% of those under age 18 and 20.40% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Major roads

The sign for Calhoun County on FL 20
The sign for Calhoun County on FL 20

Calhoun County is not served by any Interstate or U.S. Highways; the nearest access to the Interstate Highway System is Interstate 10 in Sneads in neighboring Jackson County and to the U.S. Highway System is U.S. Route 231 in northeastern Bay County.

See also: List of county roads in Calhoun County, Florida

Airport

Politics

Voter registration

According to the Secretary of State's office, Republicans hold a narrow majority among registered voters in Calhoun County as of 2022. However, Democrats held a sizable majority of registered voters as recently as 2017.

Calhoun County Voter Registration & Party Enrollment as of March 31, 2022[20]
Political Party Total Voters Percentage
Republican 3,655 44.79%
Democratic 3,500 42.89%
Independent 955 11.70%
Third Parties 50 0.61%
Total 8,160 100%

Statewide elections

Like most of the Florida Panhandle, Calhoun County votes heavily Republican in presidential and congressional races yet still occasionally supports conservative Democrats in local and state contests.

United States presidential election results for Calhoun County, Florida[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,274 80.68% 1,209 18.49% 54 0.83%
2016 4,655 75.96% 1,241 20.25% 232 3.79%
2012 4,366 70.61% 1,664 26.91% 153 2.47%
2008 4,345 69.36% 1,821 29.07% 98 1.56%
2004 3,782 63.42% 2,116 35.49% 65 1.09%
2000 2,873 55.52% 2,156 41.66% 146 2.82%
1996 1,717 41.29% 1,794 43.15% 647 15.56%
1992 1,721 37.58% 1,665 36.36% 1,193 26.05%
1988 2,422 64.01% 1,329 35.12% 33 0.87%
1984 2,493 65.48% 1,312 34.46% 2 0.05%
1980 1,504 38.72% 2,300 59.22% 80 2.06%
1976 1,153 31.26% 2,487 67.42% 49 1.33%
1972 2,069 81.68% 461 18.20% 3 0.12%
1968 356 11.38% 398 12.72% 2,375 75.90%
1964 1,793 64.66% 980 35.34% 0 0.00%
1960 634 28.46% 1,594 71.54% 0 0.00%
1956 554 24.57% 1,701 75.43% 0 0.00%
1952 590 24.41% 1,827 75.59% 0 0.00%
1948 128 7.13% 1,404 78.26% 262 14.60%
1944 207 12.10% 1,504 87.90% 0 0.00%
1940 171 9.03% 1,722 90.97% 0 0.00%
1936 181 14.79% 1,043 85.21% 0 0.00%
1932 129 8.84% 1,331 91.16% 0 0.00%
1928 409 35.02% 727 62.24% 32 2.74%
1924 56 10.79% 406 78.23% 57 10.98%
1920 99 9.02% 861 78.42% 138 12.57%
1916 209 24.85% 539 64.09% 93 11.06%
1912 67 10.15% 332 50.30% 261 39.55%
1908 339 49.56% 241 35.23% 104 15.20%
1904 160 40.30% 162 40.81% 75 18.89%


Previous gubernatorial elections results
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2018 77.59% 3,576 20.03% 923 2.39% 110
2014 63.91% 2,676 28.71% 1,202 7.38% 309
2010 51.23% 2,201 43.18% 1,855 5.59% 240
2006 50.79% 1,737 45.70% 1,563 3.51% 120
2002 45.10% 1,917 53.49% 2,274 1.41% 60
1998 60.13% 1,796 39.87% 1,191
1994 49.50% 1,775 50.50% 1,811

County commissioners

Local elected officials

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Calhoun County School District operates public schools. Its two senior high schools are Blountstown High School and Altha Public School.

Library

Along with the six branches within the Calhoun County Public Library System, Calhoun County is also a part of the Panhandle Public Library Cooperative System. PPLCS also includes Holmes and Jackson counties. Branches are located in the following communities and offer public computers with internet access, free wi-fi, programming for all ages, downloadable e-books and e-audiobooks, and numerous online databases and resources.

Communities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.[15][16]

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Calhoun County, Florida". Archived from the original on June 20, 2018. Retrieved June 20, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2022.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Publications of the Florida Historical Society. Florida Historical Society. 1908. p. 30.
  5. ^ Long, John H., ed. (2007). "Florida: Consolidated Chronology of State and County Boundaries". The Newberry Library. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  6. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=M85PAAAAIBAJ&sjid=u1QDAAAAIBAJ&dq=mcclelland%20coroner&pg=5398%2C5991871[bare URL]
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  8. ^ "Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, Conversion of Two F-15 Fighter Squadrons to F-22 Fighter Squadrons: Environmental Impact Statement". September 23, 2000 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ "Florida Geographic Names". U.S.G.S. Topographic Division, Office of Research & Technical Standards, National Center. September 23, 1981 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  14. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  15. ^ http://www.census.gov[not specific enough to verify]
  16. ^ "About the Hispanic Population and its Origin". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 18, 2022.
  17. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  18. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  19. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  20. ^ "Voter Registration - Current by County - Division of Elections - Florida Department of State". Archived from the original on October 24, 2016. Retrieved October 24, 2016.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  22. ^ "Government".

Government links/Constitutional offices

Special districts

Judicial branch

Tourism links

Coordinates: 30°25′N 85°12′W / 30.41°N 85.20°W / 30.41; -85.20