Coordinates: 28°46′N 81°43′W / 28.77°N 81.72°W / 28.77; -81.72

Lake County
Old Lake County Courthouse
Location within the U.S. state of Florida
Florida's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 28°46′N 81°43′W / 28.77°N 81.72°W / 28.77; -81.72
Country United States
State Florida
FoundedMay 27, 1887
SeatTavares
Largest cityClermont
Area
 • Total1,157 sq mi (3,000 km2)
 • Land938 sq mi (2,430 km2)
 • Water219 sq mi (570 km2)  18.9%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
367,118
 • Density369/sq mi (142/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts6th, 11th, 15th
Websitewww.lakecountyfl.gov

Lake County is a county in the central portion of the U.S. state of Florida. As of the 2010 census, the population was 297,052.[1] Its county seat is Tavares,[2] and its largest city is Clermont. Lake County is included in the Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Lake County was created in 1887 from portions of Sumter and Orange counties. It was named for the many lakes contained within its borders[3] (250 named lakes and 1,735 other bodies of water[4]).

In the 1800s, the two main industries in the area were growing cotton and breeding cattle. In the latter part of the 19th century, people started to grow citrus trees. Throughout the 1940s and 50s, citrus production increased and grew into the area's leading industry.[citation needed] The December 1989 United States cold wave destroyed most of the citrus groves, dealing an economic blow that farmers could not recover from. Groves sold massive amounts of land to developers, resulting in increasing urban sprawl.[5]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,157 square miles (3,000 km2), of which 938 square miles (2,430 km2) is land and 219 square miles (570 km2) (18.9%) is water.[6]

Sugarloaf Mountain is the highest point in peninsular Florida, at 312 feet (95 m) above sea level.[7]

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18908,034
19007,467−7.1%
19109,50927.3%
192012,74434.0%
193023,16181.7%
194027,25517.7%
195036,34033.3%
196057,38357.9%
197069,30520.8%
1980104,87051.3%
1990152,10445.0%
2000210,52838.4%
2010297,05241.1%
2020383,95629.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2019[1]

As of the census[12] of 2010, there were 297,047 people and 130,190 households residing in the county. The population density was 316.6 people per square mile (122.2/km2). There were 163,586 housing units at an average density of 174.3 per square mile (67.3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 83.4% White (68.7% non-Hispanic White), 11.5% Black or African American, 0.6% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, and 2.1% from two or more races. 16.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 88,413 households, out of which 23.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.30% were non-families. 24.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.75.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 20.30% under the age of 18, 5.80% from 18 to 24, 23.80% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 26.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,903, and the median income for a family was $42,577. Males had a median income of $31,475 versus $23,545 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,199. About 6.90% of families and 9.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.80% of those under age 18 and 6.30% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Lake County is represented by U.S. Senators Rick Scott and Marco Rubio, and U.S. Representatives Michael Waltz (R-FL6), Daniel Webster (R-FL11), and Scott Franklin (R-FL15).[13]

In the Florida Senate, Lake County is represented by Senators Dennis Baxley (R-FL12), and Kelli Stargel (R-FL22) . In the Florida House, Lake County is represented by Florida Representatives Keith Truenow (R-FL31), Anthony Sabatini (R-FL32), and Brett Hage (R-FL33).[14]

Lake County has five Constitutional Officers: Gary Cooney (Clerk of the Court and Comptroller), Peyton Grinnell (Sheriff), Cary Baker (Property Appraiser), David Jordan (Tax Collector), and Alan Hays (Supervisor of Elections), and five County Commissioners: Tim Sullivan (R-District 1), Sean Parks (R-District 2), Kirby Smith (R-District 3), Leslie Campione (R-District 4), and Josh Blake (R-District 5).[15]

The Florida Department of Corrections has Region III Correctional Facility Office on the grounds of the Lake Correctional Institution in an unincorporated area in Lake County.[16][17]

Libraries

The Lake County Library System was established in 1975 following the establishment of the Lake County Library Planning Advisory Board. Today it is governed by the Lake County Board of County Commissioners. The library system is made up of 6 branch libraries and 10 municipal libraries:

Elections

Lake County has voted Republican in U.S. presidential races since 1948.[32]

Presidential elections results
Lake County vote
by party in presidential elections
[32]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 59.6% 125,859 39.5% 83,505 0.9% 1,950
2016 59.5% 102,188 36.6% 62,838 3.9% 6,773
2012 58.0% 87,643 40.9% 61,799 1.1% 1,702
2008 56.2% 82,802 42.7% 62,948 1.1% 1,621
2004 60.0% 74,389 38.9% 48,221 1.1% 1,340
2000 56.4% 50,010 41.3% 36,571 2.3% 2,030
1996 47.5% 35,097 40.3% 29,752 12.3% 9,074
1992 44.2% 30,825 33.2% 23,200 22.6% 15,762
1988 68.4% 37,327 30.7% 16,766 0.9% 479
1984 74.3% 35,319 25.7% 12,217 0.0% 7
1980 64.5% 26,798 31.6% 13,128 3.9% 1,602
1976 57.4% 19,976 41.3% 14,369 1.3% 442
1972 82.6% 23,079 17.2% 4,803 0.2% 48
1968 47.4% 11,763 18.5% 4,599 34.0% 8,442
1964 62.4% 12,897 37.6% 7,773
1960 72.5% 12,979 27.6% 4,936
1956 71.6% 10,888 28.4% 4,326
1952 70.6% 9,132 29.4% 3,797
1948 43.2% 3,579 42.0% 3,474 14.8% 1,226
1944 38.4% 2,693 61.6% 4,323
1940 33.3% 2,659 66.7% 5,322
1936 33.5% 2,034 66.5% 4,045
1932 37.8% 1,867 62.2% 3,070
1928 68.1% 3,383 29.7% 1,474 2.3% 112
1924 36.5% 948 53.1% 1,381 10.4% 271
1920 28.9% 734 67.7% 1,720 3.4% 86
1916 25.3% 330 67.8% 886 7.0% 91
1912 11.3% 92 73.5% 596 15.2% 123
1908 24.0% 200 58.5% 487 17.5% 146
1904 20.3% 148 72.7% 529 7.0% 51
1900 20.6% 143 70.8% 492 8.6% 60
1896 24.4% 302 70.2% 870 5.5% 68
1892 85.7% 1,137 14.3% 190

Voter registration

Data comes from the Lake County Supervisor of Elections.[33]

Party Registration and Enrollment
Party Number of Registered Voters %
Republican 106,063 44.9
Democratic 73,459 31.1
Independent 61,509 26.1
Other 1,631 <0.1
Total 242,662 100

Education

[clarification needed]

Main article: Lake County Schools

There are a number of public schools in the county.

Colleges

The following colleges are in the county:

Transportation

Aviation

The Tavares Seaplane Base[34] is a city-owned, public-use seaplane base on Lake Dora in Tavares.[35]

Panorama of the Tavares Seaplane Base & Marina on Lake Dora
Panorama of the Tavares Seaplane Base & Marina on Lake Dora

The Leesburg International Airport is a former Army Airfield and municipal airport along Lake Harris east of downtown Leesburg, Florida.

Mid Florida Air Service Airport is on State Road 44 east of Eustis.[36]

Major highways

See also: List of county roads in Lake County, Florida

Public transportation

LakeXpress is the public transportation agency that serves the Lake County, Florida area since 2007.

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Publications of the Florida Historical Society. Florida Historical Society. 1908. p. 32.
  4. ^ "Financial report" (PDF). lakecountyclerk.org. 2015. Retrieved November 10, 2019.
  5. ^ Omaye, Jayna (December 13, 2014). "Devastating 1989 freeze killed citrus, ushered in development in Lake County". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 1, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. ^ Crampton, Vincent. "You won't get light-headed atop Florida's highest point". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 3, 2019. Retrieved May 3, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 3, 2019. Retrieved May 3, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 3, 2019. Retrieved May 3, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ "Region III – Correctional Facility Office Archived 2008-06-13 at the Wayback Machine." Florida Department of Corrections. Retrieved on January 8, 2010.
  17. ^ "Lake Correctional Institution." Florida Department of Corrections. Retrieved on January 8, 2010.
  18. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  19. ^ Bloodsworth, Doris. A Library Love Affair: How the Love of Books Helped Shape the History of Clermont, Florida. Florida Libraries. Vol. 53, No. 2, Fall 2010. pp. 4–6.
  20. ^ "Eustis Memorial Library".
  21. ^ "Historic Trail of FP | City of Fruitland Park Florida". www.fruitlandpark.org.
  22. ^ "Helen Lehmann Memorial Library". Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  23. ^ "Lady Lake Public Library". Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  24. ^ "Welcome to Leesburg". leesburgflorida.gov.
  25. ^ "Marianne Beck Memorial Library". howey.org. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  26. ^ "Marion Baysinger Memorial Library". Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  27. ^ "Minneola Schoolhouse Library". Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  28. ^ "Tavares Public Library | Tavares, FL – Official Website". www.tavares.org.
  29. ^ "HOME". Umatilla Library.
  30. ^ "W.T. Bland Public Library | Mount Dora, FL – Official Website". ci.mount-dora.fl.us.
  31. ^ Lake County Library System. Online, available: https://www.mylakelibrary.org/ Archived March 12, 2017(Date mismatch), at the Wayback Machine
  32. ^ a b Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
  33. ^ Department, Lake County Board of County Commissioners, Communications. "Welcome – Lake County Supervisor of Elections". www.lakevotes.com. Archived from the original on March 31, 2017. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
  34. ^ Show, Christine (November 22, 2008). "Tavares keeps it simple in naming seaplane base". Orlando Sentinel.
  35. ^ "Tavares Seaplane Base & Marina". City of Tavares. Archived from the original on June 17, 2010. Retrieved June 16, 2010.
  36. ^ "Mid Florida Air Services Airport" (PDF).
  37. ^ "Walt Disney by Neal Gabler – eBook – Random House – Read an Excerpt". Random House. October 3, 2006. Retrieved July 22, 2010.
  38. ^ Dickinson, Joy Wallace. "Walt Disney's ties to Central Florida reach back far beyond debut of Magic Kingdom 40 years ago". OrlandoSentinel.com.

Government links/Constitutional offices

Special districts

Judicial branch

Miscellaneous links