Suwannee County
The Suwannee County Courthouse in Live Oak
Map of Florida highlighting Suwannee County
Location within the U.S. state of Florida
Map of the United States highlighting Florida
Florida's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 30°11′N 82°59′W / 30.19°N 82.99°W / 30.19; -82.99
Country United States
State Florida
FoundedDecember 21, 1858
Named forSuwannee River
SeatLive Oak
Largest cityLive Oak
Area
 • Total692 sq mi (1,790 km2)
 • Land689 sq mi (1,780 km2)
 • Water3.7 sq mi (10 km2)  0.5%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total43,474[1]
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitesuwcounty.org/county/

Suwannee County is a county located in the north central portion of the state of Florida. As of the 2020 census, the population was 43,474,[1] up from 41,551 in 2010.[2] Its county seat is Live Oak.[3] Suwannee County was a dry county until August 2011, when the sale of alcoholic beverages became legal in the county.[4]

History

Suwannee County was created in 1858,[5] as railways were constructed through the area connecting it to Jacksonville, Tallahassee, and points north. It was named after the Suwannee River, which forms the county's northern, western, and much of its southern border. The word "Suwannee" may either be a corruption of the Spanish San Juan ("Saint John") or from the Cherokee sawani ("echo river").

The rural areas supported numerous lumber and turpentine camps. In the 1930s, anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston did research in North Florida timber camps.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 692 square miles (1,790 km2), of which 689 square miles (1,780 km2) is land and 3.7 square miles (9.6 km2) (0.5%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18602,303
18703,55654.4%
18807,161101.4%
189010,52447.0%
190014,55438.3%
191018,60327.8%
192019,7896.4%
193015,731−20.5%
194017,0738.5%
195016,986−0.5%
196014,961−11.9%
197015,5594.0%
198022,28743.2%
199026,78020.2%
200034,84430.1%
201041,55119.2%
202043,4744.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2019[2] 2020[1]
Suwannee County racial composition as of 2020
(NH = Non-Hispanic)[a]
Race Pop 2010[13] Pop 2020[14] % 2010 % 2020
White (NH) 32,300 31,664 77.74% 72.83%
Black or African American (NH) 4,696 4,920 11.3% 11.32%
Native American or Alaska Native (NH) 162 167 0.39% 0.38%
Asian (NH) 223 270 0.54% 0.62%
Pacific Islander (NH) 11 16 0.03% 0.04%
Some Other Race (NH) 37 143 0.09% 0.33%
Mixed/Multi-Racial (NH) 526 1,509 1.27% 3.47%
Hispanic or Latino 3,596 4,785 8.65% 11.01%
Total 41,551 43,474 100.00% 100.00%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 43,474 people, 15,149 households, and 10,655 families residing in the county.

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 34,844 people, 13,460 households, and 9,691 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km2). There were 15,679 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.53% White, 12.11% Black or African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.12% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 4.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,460 households, out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.50% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.00% were non-families. 23.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.00% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 25.10% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 95.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,963, and the median income for a family was $34,032. Males had a median income of $26,256 versus $21,136 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,678. About 14.80% of families and 18.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.90% of those under age 18 and 12.40% of those age 65 or over.

In March 2016, the county's unemployment rate was 4.8%.

Libraries

Suwannee County is served by the Suwannee River Regional Library System, which contains eight branches and also serves Hamilton and Madison counties.

Suwannee River Regional Library was first formed by a contractual agreement between Suwannee and Lafayette counties, making it the first regional library in Florida.[16] In 1957, the local Library Board learned that they might get a grant for a new library if they joined with another county. The Suwannee Board convinced the Mayo Woman's Club in Lafayette County to have their county join with Suwannee County and organize the first library region in Florida. With the formation of the duo-county, Suwannee-Lafayette Library Region, it immediately received $28,224 in funds. A small library was established at Mayo in Lafayette County in October 1957. The library started as a 3,100 book collection but soon grew to some 10,000 titles, some loaned from the State Library. A bookmobile was also added and put on the road.

After being successful with its new library, the Suwannee River Regional Library System was approached by a number of nearby counties interested in the project, and in 1959 Columbia, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Madison and Taylor counties qualified for membership and became a part of the system. Greenville, Jasper, Lake City, Madison, and Perry had small libraries operated by a Woman's Club that were also absorbed into the organization. By 1960, the library system now had 23,500 books in its collection, 3,000 of which were a gift from the Miami Public Library. On August 2 of that year, Dixie County became the last one to be invited to join in. Later, the Cross City library observed its official opening December 1, 1960. In May, 1990 Madison County expanded by establishing a small satellite branch library in the Town of Lee. The Suwannee County library in Live Oak is the headquarters of the organization, as it has been since the establishment of the Suwannee River Regional Library System.[17]

Transportation

Airports

Suwannee County is accessed by air from Suwannee County Airport, located two miles west of Live Oak. It is a publicly operated airport run by the county government that has a paved runway in excess of 4,000 feet, major aircraft maintenance, training, car rental, as well as selling 100LL aviation fuel from a manned FBO. There are also many private airparks scattered throughout the county.

Railroads

Suwannee County has one surviving railroad line. The primary one is a Florida Gulf & Atlantic Railroad line formerly owned by CSX, Seaboard System Railroad, Seaboard Coast Line Industries and Seaboard Air Line Railroad that served Amtrak's Sunset Limited until it was truncated to New Orleans in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina. Union Depot and Atlantic Coast Line Freight Station was Suwannee County's premiere railroad station on the corner of US 129 & SR 136 in Live Oak, and served both the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard Air Line Railroad but has not been in use since 1971, with the termination of the Louisville and Nashville and Seaboard Coast Line's Gulf Wind (New Orleans - Jacksonville). The Seaboard Air Line operated two passenger trains a day in each direction until 1966 or 1967.[18] Various abandoned lines also exist within the county, one of which was converted into the Suwannee River Greenway Trail, along the southeastern part of the county.

Major roads

Main article: List of county roads in Suwannee County, Florida

Communities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

Politics

United States presidential election results for Suwannee County, Florida[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 16,410 77.84% 4,485 21.27% 188 0.89%
2016 14,287 76.05% 3,964 21.10% 536 2.85%
2012 12,672 71.63% 4,751 26.85% 269 1.52%
2008 12,534 70.77% 4,916 27.76% 261 1.47%
2004 11,153 70.58% 4,522 28.62% 127 0.80%
2000 8,009 64.27% 4,076 32.71% 376 3.02%
1996 5,742 47.28% 4,479 36.88% 1,923 15.83%
1992 4,576 40.23% 3,988 35.06% 2,810 24.71%
1988 5,863 64.27% 3,129 34.30% 130 1.43%
1984 6,082 68.57% 2,788 31.43% 0 0.00%
1980 3,899 46.22% 4,345 51.51% 192 2.28%
1976 2,405 32.49% 4,718 63.74% 279 3.77%
1972 4,435 80.77% 1,027 18.70% 29 0.53%
1968 845 14.13% 1,182 19.76% 3,955 66.12%
1964 3,002 55.64% 2,393 44.36% 0 0.00%
1960 1,536 35.51% 2,789 64.49% 0 0.00%
1956 1,046 24.85% 3,163 75.15% 0 0.00%
1952 1,611 36.30% 2,827 63.70% 0 0.00%
1948 398 9.40% 3,033 71.62% 804 18.98%
1944 483 16.05% 2,526 83.95% 0 0.00%
1940 401 12.27% 2,866 87.73% 0 0.00%
1936 202 6.59% 2,863 93.41% 0 0.00%
1932 163 7.13% 2,123 92.87% 0 0.00%
1928 606 31.68% 1,286 67.22% 21 1.10%
1924 111 9.50% 977 83.65% 80 6.85%
1920 382 18.65% 1,486 72.56% 180 8.79%
1916 56 3.94% 1,209 85.14% 155 10.92%
1912 54 5.26% 714 69.59% 258 25.15%
1908 150 14.25% 597 56.70% 306 29.06%
1904 125 16.23% 584 75.84% 61 7.92%


See also

Notes

  1. ^ Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.[11][12]

References

  1. ^ a b c "QuickFacts:Suwannee County, Florida". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 15, 2014.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Suwannee Votes Wet", Suwannee Democrat
  5. ^ Publications of the Florida Historical Society. Florida Historical Society. 1908. p. 34.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ www.census.gov
  12. ^ "About the Hispanic Population and its Origin". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 18, 2022.
  13. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  16. ^ Nistendirk, Verna (1962). "Ten Years of Florida Library Progress". ALA Bulletin. 56 (5): 413–415. ISSN 0364-4006. JSTOR 25696429.
  17. ^ "Suwannee River Regional Library". Digital Collections.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ Official Guide of the Railways, June 1966, Seaboard Air Line section
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.

Government links/Constitutional offices

Special districts

Judicial branch

Tourism links

Environmental

Coordinates: 30°11′N 82°59′W / 30.19°N 82.99°W / 30.19; -82.99