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Apple silicon is a series of system on a chip (SoC) and system in a package (SiP) processors designed by Apple Inc., mainly using the ARM architecture. It is the basis of most new Mac computers as well as iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, Apple TV, and Apple Watch, and of products such as AirPods, HomePod and its successor HomePod Mini, and AirTag.

Apple announced its plan to switch Mac computers from Intel processors to Apple silicon at WWDC 2020 on June 22, 2020.[1][2] The first Macs built with the Apple M1 processor were unveiled on November 10, 2020. In 2022, the newest Mac models have been built with Apple silicon; only older models of the Mac Mini and the Mac Pro still use Intel Core and Xeon processors respectively.[3][4]

Apple outsources the chips' manufacture but fully controls their integration with the company's hardware and software. Johny Srouji is in charge of Apple's silicon design.[5]

A series

The Apple "A" series is a family of SoCs used in the iPhone, certain iPad models (iPads Pro and Air models released since 2021 use the M1 SoC), and the Apple TV. "A" series chips were also used in the discontinued iPod Touch line and the original HomePod. They integrate one or more ARM-based processing cores (CPU), a graphics processing unit (GPU), cache memory and other electronics necessary to provide mobile computing functions within a single physical package.[6]

Apple A4

Main article: Apple A4

The Apple A4 is a PoP SoC manufactured by Samsung, the first SoC Apple designed in-house.[7] It combines an ARM Cortex-A8 CPU – also used in Samsung's S5PC110A01 SoC[8][9] – and a PowerVR SGX 535 graphics processor (GPU),[10][11][12] all built on Samsung's 45-nanometer silicon chip fabrication process.[13][14] The design emphasizes power efficiency.[15] The A4 commercially debuted in 2010, in Apple's iPad tablet,[10] and was later used in the iPhone 4 smartphone,[16] the fourth-generation iPod Touch, and the 2nd-generation Apple TV.[17]

The Cortex-A8 core used in the A4, dubbed "Hummingbird", is thought to use performance improvements developed by Samsung in collaboration with chip designer Intrinsity, which was subsequently acquired by Apple[18][19] It can run at far higher clock rates than other Cortex-A8 designs yet remains fully compatible with the design provided by ARM.[20] The A4 runs at different speeds in different products: 1 GHz in the first iPads,[21] 800 MHz in the iPhone 4 and fourth-generation iPod Touch, and an undisclosed speed in the 2nd-generation Apple TV.

The A4's SGX535 GPU could theoretically push 35 million polygons per second and 500 million pixels per second, although real-world performance may be considerably less.[22] Other performance improvements include additional L2 cache.

The A4 processor package does not contain RAM, but supports PoP installation. The 1st-generation iPad, fourth-generation iPod Touch,[23] and the 2nd-generation Apple TV[24] have an A4 mounted with two low-power 128 MB DDR SDRAM chips (totaling 256 MB), while the iPhone 4 has two 256 MB packages for a total of 512 MB.[25][26][27] The RAM is connected to the processor using ARM's 64-bit-wide AMBA 3 AXI bus. To give the iPad high graphics bandwidth, the width of the RAM data bus is double that used in previous ARM11- and ARM9-based Apple devices.[28]

Apple A5

Main article: Apple A5

The Apple A5 is an SoC manufactured by Samsung[29] that replaced the A4. The chip commercially debuted with the release of Apple's iPad 2 tablet in March 2011,[30] followed by its release in the iPhone 4S smartphone later that year. Compared to the A4, the A5 CPU "can do twice the work" and the GPU has "up to nine times the graphics performance",[31] according to Apple.

The A5 contains a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 CPU[32] with ARM's advanced SIMD extension, marketed as NEON, and a dual core PowerVR SGX543MP2 GPU. This GPU can push between 70 and 80 million polygons/second and has a pixel fill rate of 2 billion pixels/second. The iPad 2's technical specifications page says the A5 is clocked at 1 GHz,[33] though it can adjust its frequency to save battery life.[32][34] The clock speed of the unit used in the iPhone 4S is 800 MHz. Like the A4, the A5 process size is 45 nm.[35]

An updated 32 nm version of the A5 processor was used in the 3rd-generation Apple TV, the fifth-generation iPod Touch, the iPad Mini, and the new version of iPad 2 (version iPad2,4).[36] The chip in the Apple TV has one core locked.[37][38] Markings on the square package indicate that it is named APL2498, and in software, the chip is called S5L8942. The 32 nm variant of the A5 provides around 15% better battery life during web browsing, 30% better when playing 3D games and about 20% better battery life during video playback.[39]

In March 2013, Apple released an updated version of the 3rd-generation Apple TV (Rev A, model A1469) containing a smaller, single-core version of the A5 processor. Unlike the other A5 variants, this version of the A5 is not a PoP, having no stacked RAM. The chip is very small, just 6.1×6.2 mm, but as the decrease in size is not due to a decrease in feature size (it is still on a 32 nm fabrication process), this indicates that this A5 revision is of a new design.[40] Markings tell that it is named APL7498, and in software, the chip is called S5L8947.[41][42]

Apple A5X

Main article: Apple A5X

The Apple A5X is an SoC announced on March 7, 2012, at the launch of the third-generation iPad. It is a high-performance variant of the Apple A5; Apple claims it has twice the graphics performance of the A5.[43] It was superseded in the fourth-generation iPad by the Apple A6X processor.

The A5X has a quad-core graphics unit (PowerVR SGX543MP4) instead of the previous dual-core as well as a quad-channel memory controller that provides a memory bandwidth of 12.8 GB/s, roughly three times more than in the A5. The added graphics cores and extra memory channels add up to a very large die size of 165 mm²,[44] for example twice the size of Nvidia Tegra 3.[45] This is mainly due to the large PowerVR SGX543MP4 GPU. The clock frequency of the dual ARM Cortex-A9 cores have been shown to operate at the same 1 GHz frequency as in A5.[46] The RAM in A5X is separate from the main CPU package.[47]

Apple A6

Main article: Apple A6

The Apple A6 is a PoP SoC introduced on September 12, 2012, at the launch of the iPhone 5, then a year later was inherited by its minor successor the iPhone 5C. Apple states that it is up to twice as fast and has up to twice the graphics power compared to its predecessor the Apple A5.[48] It is 22% smaller and draws less power than the 45 nm A5.[49]

The A6 is said to use a 1.3 GHz[50] custom[51] Apple-designed ARMv7 based dual-core CPU, called Swift,[52] rather than a licensed CPU from ARM like in previous designs, and an integrated 266 MHz triple-core PowerVR SGX 543MP3[53] graphics processing unit (GPU). The Swift core in the A6 uses a new tweaked instruction set, ARMv7s, featuring some elements of the ARM Cortex-A15 such as support for the Advanced SIMD v2, and VFPv4.[51] The A6 is manufactured by Samsung on a high-κ metal gate (HKMG) 32 nm process.[54]

Apple A6X

Main article: Apple A6X

Apple A6X is an SoC introduced at the launch of the fourth-generation iPad on October 23, 2012. It is a high-performance variant of the Apple A6. Apple claims the A6X has twice the CPU performance and up to twice the graphics performance of its predecessor, the Apple A5X.[55]

Like the A6, this SoC continues to use the dual-core Swift CPU, but it has a new quad core GPU, quad channel memory and slightly higher 1.4 GHz CPU clock rate.[56] It uses an integrated quad-core PowerVR SGX 554MP4 graphics processing unit (GPU) running at 300 MHz and a quad-channel memory subsystem.[56][57] Compared to the A6 the A6X is 30% larger, but it continues to be manufactured by Samsung on a high-κ metal gate (HKMG) 32 nm process.[57]

Apple A7

Main article: Apple A7

The Apple A7 is a 64-bit PoP SoC whose first appearance was in the iPhone 5S, which was introduced on September 10, 2013. The chip would also be used in the iPad Air, iPad Mini 2 and iPad Mini 3. Apple states that it is up to twice as fast and has up to twice the graphics power compared to its predecessor the Apple A6.[58] The Apple A7 chip is the first 64-bit chip to be used in a smartphone and later a tablet computer.[59]

The A7 features an Apple-designed 1.3[60]–1.4[61] GHz 64-bit[62] ARMv8-A[63][64] dual-core CPU,[60] called Cyclone,[63] and an integrated PowerVR G6430 GPU in a four cluster configuration.[65] The ARMv8-A architecture doubles the number of registers of the A7 compared to the A6.[66] It now has 31 general-purpose registers that are each 64-bits wide and 32 floating-point/NEON registers that are each 128-bits wide.[62] The A7 is manufactured by Samsung on a high-κ metal gate (HKMG) 28 nm process[67] and the chip includes over 1 billion transistors on a die 102 mm2 in size.[60]

Apple A8

Main article: Apple A8

The Apple A8 is a 64-bit PoP SoC manufactured by TSMC. Its first appearance was in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which were introduced on September 9, 2014.[68] A year later it would drive the iPad Mini 4. Apple states that it has 25% more CPU performance and 50% more graphics performance while drawing only 50% of the power compared to its predecessor, the Apple A7.[69] On February 9, 2018, Apple released the HomePod, which is powered by an Apple A8 with 1 GB of RAM.[70]

The A8 features an Apple-designed 1.4[71] GHz 64-bit[72] ARMv8-A[72] dual-core CPU, and an integrated custom PowerVR GX6450 GPU in a four cluster configuration.[71] The GPU features custom shader cores and compiler.[73] The A8 is manufactured on a 20 nm process[74] by TSMC,[75] which replaced Samsung as the manufacturer of Apple's mobile device processors. It contains 2 billion transistors. Despite that being double the number of transistors compared to the A7, its physical size has been reduced by 13% to 89 mm2 (consistent with a shrink only, not known to be a new microarchitecture).[76]

Apple A8X

Main article: Apple A8X

The Apple A8X is a 64-bit SoC introduced at the launch of the iPad Air 2 on October 16, 2014.[77] It is a high performance variant of the Apple A8. Apple states that it has 40% more CPU performance and 2.5 times the graphics performance of its predecessor, the Apple A7.[77][78]

Unlike the A8, this SoC uses a triple-core CPU, a new octa-core GPU, dual channel memory and slightly higher 1.5 GHz CPU clock rate.[79] It uses an integrated custom octa-core PowerVR GXA6850 graphics processing unit (GPU) running at 450 MHz and a dual-channel memory subsystem.[79] It is manufactured by TSMC on their 20 nm fabrication process, and consists of 3 billion transistors.

Apple A9

Main article: Apple A9

The Apple A9 is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, which were introduced on September 9, 2015.[80] Apple states that it has 70% more CPU performance and 90% more graphics performance compared to its predecessor, the Apple A8.[80] It is dual sourced, a first for an Apple SoC; it is manufactured by Samsung on their 14 nm FinFET LPE process and by TSMC on their 16 nm FinFET process. It was subsequently included in the first-generation iPhone SE, and the iPad (5th generation). The Apple A9 was the last CPU that Apple manufactured through a contract with Samsung, as all A-series chips after are manufactured by TSMC.

Apple A9X

Main article: Apple A9X

The Apple A9X is a 64-bit SoC that was announced on September 9, 2015, and released on November 11, 2015, and first appeared in the iPad Pro.[81] It offers 80% more CPU performance and two times the GPU performance of its predecessor, the Apple A8X. It is manufactured by TSMC using a 16 nm FinFET process.[82]

Apple A10 Fusion

Main article: Apple A10

The Apple A10 Fusion is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, which were introduced on September 7, 2016.[83] The A10 is also featured in the sixth-generation iPad, seventh-generation iPad and seventh-generation iPod Touch.[84] It has a new ARM big.LITTLE quad core design with two high performance cores, and two smaller highly efficient cores. It is 40% faster than the A9, with 50% faster graphics. It is manufactured by TSMC on their 16 nm FinFET process.

Apple A10X Fusion

Main article: Apple A10X

The Apple A10X Fusion is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the 10.5" iPad Pro and the second generation of the 12.9" iPad Pro, which were both announced on June 5, 2017.[85] It is a variant of the A10 and Apple claims that it has 30 percent faster CPU performance and 40 percent faster GPU performance than its predecessor, the A9X.[85] On September 12, 2017, Apple announced that the Apple TV 4K would be powered by an A10X chip. It is made by TSMC on their 10 nm FinFET process.[86]

Apple A11 Bionic

Main article: Apple A11

The Apple A11 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC[87] that first appeared in the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, which were introduced on September 12, 2017.[87] It has two high-performance cores, which are 25% faster than the A10 Fusion, four high-efficiency cores, which are 70% faster than the energy-efficient cores in the A10, and for the first time an Apple-designed three-core GPU with 30% faster graphics performance than the A10.[87][88] It is also the first A-series chip to feature Apple's "Neural Engine," which enhances artificial intelligence and machine learning processes.[89]

Apple A12 Bionic

Main article: Apple A12

The Apple A12 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the iPhone XS, XS Max and XR, which were introduced on September 12, 2018. It is also used in the third-generation iPad Air, fifth-generation iPad Mini, and the eighth-generation iPad. It has two high-performance cores, which are 15% faster than the A11 Bionic, and four high-efficiency cores, which have 50% lower power usage than the energy-efficient cores in the A11 Bionic.[90] The A12 is manufactured by TSMC[91] using a 7 nm[92] FinFET process, the first to ship in a smartphone.[93][91] It is also used in the 6th generation Apple TV.

Apple A12X Bionic

Main article: Apple A12X

The Apple A12X Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the 11.0" iPad Pro and the third generation of the 12.9" iPad Pro, which were both announced on October 30, 2018.[94] It offers 35% faster single-core and 90% faster multi-core CPU performance than its predecessor, the A10X. It has four high-performance cores and four high-efficiency cores. The A12X is manufactured by TSMC using a 7 nm FinFET process.

Apple A12Z Bionic

The Apple A12Z Bionic is an updated version the A12X Bionic, first appearing in the fourth generation iPad Pro, which was announced on March 18, 2020.[95] It adds an additional GPU core, compared to the A12X, for improved graphics performance.[96]The A12Z is also used in the Developer Transition Kit prototype computer that helps developers prepare their software for Macs based on Apple silicon.[97]

Apple A13 Bionic

Main article: Apple A13

The Apple A13 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max, which were introduced on September 10, 2019. It is also featured in the second-generation iPhone SE (released April 15, 2020), the 9th generation iPad (announced September 14, 2021) and in the Studio Display (announced March 8, 2022)

The entire A13 SoC features a total of 18 cores – a six-core CPU, four-core GPU, and an eight-core Neural Engine processor, which is dedicated to handling on-board machine learning processes; four of the six cores on the CPU are low-powered cores that are dedicated to handling less CPU-intensive operations, such as voice calls, browsing the Web, and sending messages, while two higher-performance cores are used only for more CPU-intensive processes, such as recording 4K video or playing a video game.[98]

Apple A14 Bionic

Main article: Apple A14

The Apple A14 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the fourth-generation iPad Air and iPhone 12, released on October 23, 2020. It is the first commercially available 5 nm chipset and it contains 11.8 billion transistors and a 16-core AI processor.[99] It includes Samsung LPDDR4X DRAM, a 6-core CPU, and 4-Core GPU with real time machine learning capabilities.

Apple A15 Bionic

Main article: Apple A15

The Apple A15 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based SoC that first appeared in the iPhone 13, unveiled on September 14, 2021. The A15 is built on a 5-nanometer manufacturing process with 15 billion transistors. It has 2 high-performance processing cores, 4 high-efficiency cores, a new 5-core graphics for iPhone 13 Pro series (4-core for iPhone 13&13 mini) processing unit, and a new 16-core Neural Engine capable of 15.8 trillion operations per second.[100][101]

List of processors

General Image Semiconductor technology Computer architecture CPU GPU AI accelerator Memory technology First released date Utilizing devices Supported OS
Name Codename Part No. Node Manufacturer Transistors count Die size CPU ISA Bit width Performance core Efficiency core Overall cores Cache Vendor Cores EU count ALU count Frequency FLOPS Cores OPS Memory bus width Total channel
Bit per channel
Memory type Theoretical
bandwidth
Available capacity Initial Terminal
Core name Cores Core speed Core name Cores Core speed L1 L2 L3 SLC
[a] APL0098 S5L8900
S5L8900.jpg
90 nm
[102]
Samsung 72 mm2
[13]
ARMv6 32-bit ARM11 1 412 MHz Single-core L1i: 16 KB
L1d: 16 KB
PowerVR MBX Lite 1 1 8 60 MHz - 103 MHz 0.96 GFLOPS - 1.64 FLOPS 16-bit 1 channel
16-bit/channel
LPDDR-266
(133 MHz)
533 MB/s 128 MB June 29, 2007 iPhone OS 1.0 iPhone OS 3.1.3[b]
iOS 4.2.1[c]
[d] APL0278 S5L8720
S5L8720.jpg
65 nm
[13]
36 mm2
[13]
533 MHz 103 MHz - 133 MHz 1.64 GFLOPs - 2.12 GFLOPS 32-bit 1 channel
32-bit/channel
1066 MB/s September 9, 2008 iPhone OS 2.1.1
[e] APL0298 S5L8920
Apple SoC S5L8920.jpg
71.8 mm2
[14]
ARMv7 Cortex-A8 600 MHz L1i: 32 KB
L1d: 32 KB
256 KB PowerVR SGX535[103] 2 16 200 MHz 6.4 GFLOPS LPDDR-400
(200 MHz)
1.6 GB/s 256 MB June 19, 2009 iPhone OS 3.0 iOS 6.1.6
APL2298 S5L8922
S5L8922.jpg
45 nm
[13][14][35]
41.6 mm2
[13]
September 9, 2009 iPhone OS 3.1.1 iOS 5.1.1
A4 APL0398 S5L8930
Apple A4 Chip.jpg
53.3 mm2
[13][14]
800 MHz 512 KB 200 MHz - 250 MHz 6.4 GFLOPS - 8.0 GFLOPS 64-bit 2 channels
32-bit/channel
3.2 GB/s April 3, 2010 iPhone OS 3.2
Apple TV Software 4.0
iOS 6.1.6
1.0 GHz iOS 5.1.1[f]
Apple TV Software 6.2.1
800 MHz 512 MB iOS 7.1.2
A5 APL0498 S5L8940
Apple A5 Chip.jpg
122.2 mm2
[35]
Cortex-A9 2 800 MHz Dual-core 1 MB PowerVR SGX543[104][53] 2 4 32 200 MHz 12.8 GFLOPS LPDDR2-800
(400 MHz)
6.4 GB/s March 11, 2011 iOS 4.3 iOS 9.3.5[g]
iOS 9.3.6[h]
Apple TV Software 7.6.2
1.0 GHz
  • iPad 2 (iPad2,1; iPad2,2; iPad2,3)
APL2498 S5L8942
Apple-A5-APL2498.jpg
32 nm
MG
[36][42]
69.6 mm2
[36]
800 MHz March 7, 2012 iOS 5.1
1.0 GHz
2 (One core locked) Dual-core
Single-core in actual
Apple TV Software 5.0
APL7498 S5L8947
Apple-A5-APL7498.jpg
37.8 mm2
[42]
1 Single-core January 28, 2013
  • Apple TV (3rd generation, Rev. A, A1469)
Apple TV Software 5.2
A5X APL5498 S5L8945
Apple A5X Chip.jpg
45 nm
[13][14][35]
165 mm2
[44]
2 Dual-core 4 8 64 25.6 GFLOPS 128-bit 4 channels
32-bit/channel
12.8 GB/s 1 GB March 16, 2012 iOS 5.1
A6 APL0598 S5L8950
Apple A6 Chip.jpg
32 nm
MG
[54][105][57]
96.71 mm2
[54][105]
ARMv7s[106] Swift[51] 1.3 GHz[107] 3 6 48 266 MHz 68.0 GFLOPS 64-bit 2 channels
32-bit/channel
LPDDR2-1066
(533 MHz)
8.5 GB/s September 21, 2012 iOS 6.0 iOS 10.3.3[i]
iOS 10.3.4[j]
A6X APL5598 S5L8955
Apple A6X chip.jpg
123 mm2
[57]
1.4 GHz[56] PowerVR SGX554[56][108] 4 16 128 300 MHz 76.8 GFLOPS 128-bit 4 channels
32-bit/channel
17.0 GB/s November 2, 2012
A7 APL0698 S5L8960
Apple A7 chip.jpg
28 nm
MG
[67][109]
1 billion 102 mm2
[62][109]
ARMv8.0-A
[63][71]
64-bit Cyclone 1.3 GHz L1i: 64 KB
L1d: 64 KB
4 MB (Inclusive)
[63][110][61]
PowerVR G6430[65][108] 450 MHz 115.2 GFLOPS 64-bit 1 channel
64-bit/channel
LPDDR3-1600
(800 MHz)
12.8 GB/s September 20, 2013 iOS 7.0 iOS 12.5.5
APL5698 S5L8965
Apple A7 S5L9865 chip.jpg
1.4 GHz November 1, 2013 iOS 7.0.3
A8 APL1011 T7000
Apple A8 system-on-a-chip.jpg
20 nm
MG
[72][71]
TSMC 2 billion 89 mm2
[111][79]
[112]
Typhoon 1.1 GHz PowerVR GX6450[73][113][114] 533 MHz 136.4 GFLOPS September 19, 2014 iOS 8.0
1.4 GHz
audioOS 11.0 HomePod Software 15.6
(Current)
1.5 GHz 2 GB iOS 8.0
tvOS 9.0
iOS 15.6
(Current)
iPadOS 15.6
(Current)
tvOS 15.6
(Current)
A8X APL1021 T7001
Apple A8X system-on-a-chip.jpg
3 billion 128 mm2
[79]
3 1.5 GHz 3-core 2 MB PowerVR GX6850[73][79][112] 8 32 256 450 MHz 230.4 GFLOPS 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
25.6 GB/s October 22, 2014 iOS 8.1
A9 APL0898 S8000
Apple A9 APL0898.jpg
14 nm
FinFET
[115]
Samsung ≥ 2 billion 96 mm2
[116]
Twister 2 1.85 GHz[117][118] Dual-core 3 MB 4 MB (Victim)

[110][119]

PowerVR GT7600[73][120] 6 24 192 650 MHz 249.6 GFLOPS 64-bit 1 channel
64-bit/channel
LPDDR4-3200
(1600 MHz)
September 25, 2015 iOS 9.0
APL1022 S8003
Apple A9 APL1022.jpg
16 nm
FinFET
[116][121][122]
TSMC 104.5 mm2
[116]
A9X APL1021 S8001
Apple A9X.jpg
≥ 3 billion 143.9 mm2
[121][86]
2.16 GHz[123][124] [110][121] PowerVR GT7850[73][121] 12 48 384 650 MHz 499.2 GFLOPS 128-bit
(64-bit in actual)
2 channels
(one channel is unused)
64-bit/channel
November 11, 2015 iOS 9.1
2.26 GHz 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
51.2 GB/s 4 GB
A10 Fusion APL1W24 T8010
Apple A10 Fusion APL1W24.jpg
3.3 billion 125 mm2
[122]
ARMv8.1-A Hurricane 2 1.64 GHz Zephyr 2 1.09 GHz Quad-core
(Only 2 cores performed at a same time)
P-core:
L1i: 64 KB
L1d: 64 KB

E-core:
L1i: 32 KB
L1d: 32KB
P-core:
3 MB

E-core:
1 MB
4 MB PowerVR GT7600 Plus[125][73][126][127] 6 24 192 900 MHz 345.6 GFLOPS 64-bit 1 channel
64-bit/channel
25.6 GB/s 2 GB September 16, 2016 iOS 10.0
2.34 GHz
3 GB
A10X Fusion APL1071 T8011
Apple A10X Fusion.jpg
10 nm
FinFET
[86]
≥ 4 billion 96.4 mm2
[86]
3 2.38 GHz 3 1.30 GHz 6-core
(Only 3 cores performed at a same time)
P-core:
8 MB

E-core:
1 MB
[128][129] 4 MB 12 48 384 1000 MHz 768.0 GFLOPS 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
51.2 GB/s 3 GB June 13, 2017 tvOS 11.0
4 GB iOS 10.3.2
A11
Bionic
APL1W72 T8015
Apple A11.jpg
4.3 billion 87.66 mm2
[130]
ARMv8.2-A[131] Monsoon 2 2.39 GHz Mistral 4 1.19 GHz 6-core First generation Apple-designed 3 24 192 1066 MHz 409.3 GFLOPS 2 600 billion OPS 64-bit 1 channel
64-bit/channel
LPDDR4X-4266
(2133 MHz)
34.1 GB/s 2 GB September 22, 2017 iOS 11.0
3 GB
A12
Bionic
APL1W81 T8020
Apple A12.jpg
7 nm
FinFET
(N7)
6.9 billion 83.27 mm2
[132]
ARMv8.3-A[133] Vortex 2.49 GHz Tempest 1.59 GHz P-core:
L1i: 128 KB
L1d: 128 KB

E-core:
L1i: 32 KB
L1d: 32KB
P-core:
8 MB

E-core:
2 MB
8 MB Second generation Apple-designed 4 32 256 1125 MHz 576.0 GFLOPS 8 5 TOPS September 21, 2018 iOS 12.0
tvOS 14.5
4 GB
A12X Bionic APL1083 T8027
Apple A12X.jpg
10 billion 135 mm2
[134]
4 8-core 7
56 448 1340 MHz 1.20 TFLOPS 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
68.2 GB/s November 7, 2018
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation)
    (64 GB, 256 GB and 512 GB storage)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch
    (64 GB, 256 GB and 512 GB storage)
iOS 12.1
6 GB
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation)
    (1 TB storage)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (1st generation)
    (1 TB storage)
A12Z Bionic
Apple A12Z.jpg
8 64 512 1.37 TFLOPS March 25, 2020 iPadOS 13.4
16 GB June 22, 2020 macOS Big Sur 11.0 Beta 1 macOS Big Sur 11.3 Beta 2
A13
Bionic
APL1W85 T8030
Apple A13 Bionic.jpg
7 nm
FinFET
(N7P)
8.5 billion 98.48 mm2
[135]
ARMv8.4-A[136] Lightning 2 2.65 GHz Thunder 1.72 GHz 6-core P-core:
L1i: 192 KB
L1d: 128 KB

E-core:
L1i: 96 KB
L1d: 48 KB
P-core:
8 MB

E-core:
4 MB
16 MB Third generation Apple-designed[137] 4 32 256 1350 MHz 691.2 GFLOPS 5.5 TOPS 64-bit 1 channel
64-bit/channel
34.1 GB/s 3 GB September 20, 2019 iOS 13.0
iPadOS 13.0
iOS 15.6
(Current)
iPadOS 15.6
(Current)
tvOS 15.6
(Current)
4 GB
A14
Bionic
APL1W01 T8101
Apple A14.jpg
5 nm
FinFET
(N5)
11.8 billion 88 mm2
[138]
ARMv8.5-A Firestorm 3.09 GHz Icestorm 1.82 GHz P-core:
L1i: 192 KB
L1d: 128 KB

E-core:
L1i: 128 KB
L1d: 64 KB
Fourth generation Apple-designed[139][137][140][141] 64 512 1000 MHz 1.0 TFLOPS 16 11 TOPS October 23, 2020 iOS 14.0
iPadOS 14.0
6 GB
A15
Bionic
APL1W07
[142]
T8110
Apple A15.jpg
5 nm
FinFET
(N5P)
15 billion 107.68 mm2[142] Avalanche 3.23 GHz Blizzard 2.02 GHz P-core:
12 MB

E-core:
4 MB
32 MB Fifth generation Apple-designed[143][144][145] 128 1024 1200 MHz 1.23 TFLOPS 15.8 TOPS 4 GB September 24, 2021 iOS 15.0
iPadOS 15.0
2.93 GHz 5 160 1280 1.54 TFLOPS
3.23 GHz 6 GB
Name Codename Part No. Image Node Manufacturer Transistors count Die size CPU ISA Bit width Core name Cores Core speed Core name Cores Core speed Overall cores L1 L2 L3 SLC Vendor Cores EU count ALU count Frequency FLOPS Cores OPS Memory bus width Total channel
Bit per channel
Memory type Theoretical
bandwidth
Available capacity First released date Utilizing devices Initial Terminal
Performance core Efficiency core Cache
General Semiconductor technology Computer architecture CPU GPU AI accelerator Memory technology Supported OS

H series

The Apple "H" series is a family of SoCs used in headphones. "H" in model numbers stands for headphones.

Apple H1

The Apple H1 chip was first used in the 2019 version of AirPods, and was later used in the Powerbeats Pro, the Beats Solo Pro, the AirPods Pro, the 2020 Powerbeats, AirPods Max,[146] and the AirPods (3rd generation). Specifically designed for headphones, it has Bluetooth 5.0, supports hands-free "Hey Siri" commands,[147] and offers 30 percent lower latency than the W1 chip used in earlier AirPods.[148]

List of processors

Name Model no. Image Bluetooth First Released Utilizing devices
H1 343S00289[149]
(AirPods 2nd Generation)
343S00290[150]
(AirPods 2nd Generation)
343S00404[151]
(AirPods Max)
H1 SiP[152]
(AirPods Pro)
Apple H1 chip
Apple H1 chip
Apple H1 chip

Apple H1 SiP
Apple H1 SiP
5.0 March
20, 2019

M series

The Apple "M" series is a family of systems on a chip (SoC) used in Mac computers from November 2020 or later, iPad Pro tablets from April 2021 or later, and iPad Air tablets from March 2022 or later. The "M" designation was previously used for Apple motion coprocessors.

Apple M1

Main article: Apple M1

Apple M1

The M1, Apple's first system on a chip designed for use in Macs, is manufactured using TSMC's 5 nm process. Announced on November 10, 2020, it is used in the MacBook Air (M1, 2020), Mac mini (M1, 2020), MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020), iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021), iPad Pro (5th generation) and iPad Air (5th generation). It comes with 4 performance cores and 4 efficiency cores, for a total of 8 CPU cores. It comes with up to 8 GPU cores, with the entry level MacBook Air having only 7 GPU cores. The M1 has 16 billion transistors.[154]

Apple M1 Pro

The M1 Pro is a more powerful version of the M1, with six to eight performance cores, two efficiency cores, 14 to 16 GPU cores, 16 Neural Engine cores, up to 32 GB unified RAM with up to 200 GB/s memory bandwidth, and more than double the transistors. It was announced on October 18, 2021, and is used in the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro. Apple said the CPU performance is about 70% faster than the M1, and that its GPU performance is about double. Apple claims the M1 Pro can deliver up to 20 streams of 4K or 7 streams of 8K ProRes video playback (up from 6 offered by Afterburner card for 2019 Mac Pro).

Apple M1 Max

The M1 Max is a larger version of the M1 Pro chip, with eight performance cores, two efficiency cores, 24 to 32 GPU cores, 16 Neural Engine cores, up to 64 GB unified RAM with up to 400 GB/s memory bandwidth, and more than double the number of transistors. It was announced on October 18, 2021, and is used in the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro, as well as the Mac Studio. Apple says it has 57 billion transistors.[155] Apple claims the M1 Max can deliver up to 30 streams of 4K (up from 23 offered by Afterburner card for 2019 Mac Pro) or 7 streams of 8K ProRes video playback.

Apple M1 Ultra

The M1 Ultra consists of two M1 Max dies connected together by a silicon interposer through Apple's UltraFusion technology.[156] It has 114 billion transistors, 16 performance cores, 4 efficiency cores, 48 to 64 GPU cores and 32 Neural Engine cores; it can be configured with up to 128 GB unified RAM of 800 GB/s memory bandwidth. It was announced on March 8, 2022 as an optional upgrade for the Mac Studio. Apple claims the M1 Ultra can deliver up to 18 streams of 8K ProRes video playback.[157]

Apple M2

Main article: Apple M2

Apple announced the M2 SoC on June 6, 2022 at WWDC, along with the MacBook Air and the 13 inch MacBook Pro. It is the successor to the Apple M1. The M2 is made with TSMC's "Enhanced 5-nanometer technology" N5P process and contains 20 billion transistors, a 25% increase from the previous generation M1. The M2 can be configured with up to 24 gigabytes of RAM and 2 terabytes of storage. It has 8 CPU cores (4 performance and 4 efficiency) and up to 10 GPU cores. The M2 also increases the memory bandwidth to 100 GB/s. Apple claims CPU improvements up to 18% and GPU improvements up to 35% compared to the previous M1.[158]

List of processors

General Image Semiconductor technology Computer architecture CPU GPU AI accelerator Memory technology Connectivity First released date Utilizing devices Supported OS
Name Codename Part No. Node Manufacturer Transistors count Die size CPU ISA Bit width Performance core Efficiency core Overall cores Cache Vendor Cores EU count ALU count Frequency FLOPS Cores OPS Memory bus width Total channel
Bit per channel
Memory type Theoretical
bandwidth
Available capacity Ports External display Initial Terminal
Core name Cores Core speed Core name Cores Core speed L1 L2 L3 SLC Thunderbolt USB Max
M1 APL1102 T8103
Apple M1 processor
5 nm FinFET (N5) TSMC 16 billion 118.91 mm2
[159]
ARMv8.5-A 64-bit Firestorm 4 3.20 GHz Icestorm 4 2.06 GHz 8-core P-core:
L1i: 192 KB
L1d: 128 KB

E-core:
L1i: 128 KB
L1d: 64 KB
P-core:
12 MB

E-core:
4 MB
8 MB Fourth generation Apple-designed 7 112 896 1278 MHz 2.29 TFLOPS 16 11 TOPS 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
LPDDR4X-4266
(2133 MHz)
68.2 GB/s 8 GB
16 GB[k]
Thunderbolt 3
(Up to 40 Gbps)[l]
USB4
(Up to 40 Gbps)[m]

USB 3.1 Gen 2
(Up to 10 Gbps)
iPad:
1 Thunderbolt/USB4[n]

MacBook and Mac Desktop:
2 Thunderbolt/USB4

iMac (4 ports):
Additional 2 USB-C

Mac mini:
Additional 2 USB-A and 1 HDMI 2.0
All:
One 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 8-bit color depth display

Mac mini:
One 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 8-bit color depth display
and one 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz at 8-bit color depth display
November 17, 2020 macOS Big Sur 11.0
iPadOS 14.5
macOS Monterey 12.5
(Current)
iPadOS 15.6
(Current)
8 128 1024 2.61 TFLOPS
M1 Pro APL1103 T6000
Apple M1 Pro processor
33.7 billion ≈ 245 mm2
[160]
6 3.23 GHz 2 P-core:
24 MB

E-core:
4 MB
24 MB 14 224 1792 1296 MHz 4.58 TFLOPS 256-bit 2 channels
128-bit/channel
LPDDR5-6400
(3200 MHz)
204.8 GB/s 16 GB
32 GB[o]
Thunderbolt 4
(Up to 40 Gbps)
MacBook:
3 Thunderbolt 4, 1 SDXC slot and 1 HDMI 2.0
Two 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth displays October 26, 2021 macOS Monterey 12.0 macOS Monterey 12.5
(Current)
8 10-core
16 256 2048 5.30 TFLOPS
M1 Max APL1105[161] T6001
Apple M1 Max processor
57 billion ≈ 432 mm2
[160]
48 MB 24 384 3072 7.83 TFLOPS 512-bit 4 channels
128-bit/channel
409.6 GB/s 32 GB
64 GB[p]
MacBook:
3 Thunderbolt 4, 1 SDXC slot and 1 HDMI 2.0

Mac Studio:
4 Thunderbolt 4, 2 USB-C, 1 SDXC slot and 1 HDMI 2.0
MacBook:
Three 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth displays
and one 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth display

Mac Studio:
Four 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth displays
and one 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth display
32 512 4096 10.6 TFLOPS
M1 Ultra APL1W06 T6002
Apple M1 Ultra processor
114 billion ≈ 864 mm2 16 4 20-core P-core:
48 MB

E-core:
8 MB
96 MB 48 768 6144 15.7 TFLOPS 32 22 TOPS 1024-bit 8 channels
128-bit/channel
819.2 GB/s 64 GB
128 GB[q]
6 Thunderbolt 4, 1 SDXC slot and 1 HDMI 2.0 Four 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth displays
and one 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz at 10-bit color depth display
March 18, 2022
  • Mac Studio
    (Model starts with 1 TB GB SSD and 64 GB RAM;
    64-core GPU is available via online configuration)
macOS Monterey 12.3
64 1024 8192 21.2 TFLOPS
M2 APL1109 T8112
Apple M2 processor
5 nm FinFET (N5P) 20 billion 155.25 mm2
[159]
Avalanche 4 3.49 GHz Blizzard 4 2.42 GHz 8-core P-core:
16 MB

E-core:
4 MB
8 MB Fifth generation Apple-designed 8 128 1024 1398 MHz 2.88 TFLOPS 16 15.8 TOPS 128-bit 2 channels
64-bit/channel
102.4 GB/s 8 GB
16 GB[r]
24 GB[s]
Thunderbolt 3
(Up to 40 Gbps)
2 Thunderbolt/USB4 One 6016 x 3384 at 60 Hz at 8-bit color depth display July 15, 2022 macOS Monterey 12.5
10 160 1280 3.6 TFLOPS June 24, 2022
Name Codename Part No. Image Node Manufacturer Transistors count Die size CPU ISA Bit width Core name Cores Core speed Core name Cores Core speed Overall cores L1 L2 L3 SLC Vendor Cores EU count ALU count Frequency FLOPS Cores OPS Memory bus width Total channel
Bit per channel
Memory type Theoretical
bandwidth
Available capacity Thunderbolt USB Max External display First released date Utilizing devices Initial Terminal
Performance core Efficiency core Cache Ports
General Semiconductor technology Computer architecture CPU GPU AI accelerator Memory technology Connectivity Supported OS

S series

The Apple "S" series is a family of systems in a package (SiP) used in the Apple Watch. It uses a customized application processor that together with memory, storage and support processors for wireless connectivity, sensors, and I/O form a complete computer in a single package. They are designed by Apple and manufactured by contract manufacturers such as Samsung.

Apple S1

Main article: Apple S1

The Apple S1 is an integrated computer. It includes memory, storage and support circuits like wireless modems and I/O controllers in a sealed integrated package. It was announced on September 9, 2014, as part of the "Wish we could say more" event. It was used in the first-generation Apple Watch.[162]

Apple S1P

Used in Apple Watch Series 1. It has a dual-core processor identical to the S2, with the exception of the built-in GPS receiver. It contains the same dual-core CPU with the same new GPU capabilities as the S2, making it about 50% faster than the S1.[163][164]

Apple S2

Main article: Apple S2

Used in the Apple Watch Series 2. It has a dual-core processor and a built-in GPS receiver. The S2's two cores deliver 50% higher performance and the GPU delivers twice as much as the predecessor,[165] and is similar in performance to the Apple S1P.[166]

Apple S3

Used in the Apple Watch Series 3. It has a dual-core processor that is 70% faster than the Apple S2 and a built-in GPS receiver.[167] There is also an option for a cellular modem and an internal eSIM module.[167] It also includes the W2 chip.[167] The S3 also contains a barometric altimeter, the W2 wireless connectivity processor, and in some models UMTS (3G) and LTE (4G) cellular modems served by a built-in eSIM.[167]

Apple S4

Used in the Apple Watch Series 4. It has a custom 64-bit dual-core processor based on the A12 with up to 2× faster performance. It also contains the W3 wireless chip, which supports Bluetooth 5. The S4 introduced 64-bit ARMv8 cores to the Apple Watch. The chip contains two Tempest cores,[168][169] which are the energy-efficient cores found in the A12. Despite the small size, Tempest still uses a 3-wide decode out-of-order superscalar design, which make them much more powerful than previous in-order cores.

The S4 contains a Neural Engine that is able to run Core ML.[170] Third-party apps can use it starting from watchOS 6. The SiP also includes new accelerometer and gyroscope functionality that has twice the dynamic range in measurable values of its predecessor, as well as being able to sample data at 8 times the speed.[171] It also contains a new custom GPU, which can use the Metal API.[172]

Apple S5

Used in the Apple Watch Series 5, Watch SE, and HomePod mini.[173] It adds a built-in magnetometer to the custom 64-bit dual-core processor and GPU of the S4.[174]

Apple S6

Used in the Apple Watch Series 6. It has a custom 64-bit dual-core processor that runs up to 20 percent faster than the S5.[175][176] The dual cores in the S6 are based on the A13's energy-efficient "little" Thunder cores at 1.8 GHz.[177] Like the S4 and S5, it also contains the W3 wireless chip.[176] The S6 adds the new U1 ultra wideband chip, an always-on altimeter, and 5 GHz WiFi.[175][176]

Apple S7

Used in the Apple Watch Series 7. The S7 has the same T8301 identifier and quoted performance as the S6.[178]

List of processors

Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache GPU Memory technology Modem First Released Utilizing devices Initial OS Terminal OS
S1 APL
0778
[179]
Apple S1 module.png
28 nm MG[180][181] 32 mm2[180] ARMv7k[181][182] 520 MHz single-core Cortex-A7[181] L1d: 32 KB[181]
L2: 256 KB[181]
PowerVR Series 5[181][183] LPDDR3[184] April 2015 watchOS 1.0 watchOS 4.3.2
S1P TBC
Apple S1P module.png
TBC ARMv7k[185][186][165] 520 MHz dual-core Cortex-A7 without GPS[185] TBC PowerVR Series 6 'Rogue'[185] LPDDR3 September 2016 watchOS 3.0 watchOS 6.3
S2
Apple S2 module.png
S3
Apple S3 module.png
ARMv7k[187] Dual-core TBC LPDDR4 Qualcomm MDM9635M (Snapdragon X7 LTE) September 2017 watchOS 4.0 watchOS 8.7
S4
Apple S4 module.png
7 nm (TSMC N7) TBC ARMv8-A ILP32[188][189] 1.59 GHz Dual-core Tempest TBC Apple G11M[189] TBC September 2018 watchOS 5.0 Current
S5
Apple S5 module.png
ARMv8-A ILP32 Apple G11M September 2019 watchOS 6.0

audioOS 14.2

S6
Apple S6 module.png
7 nm (TSMC N7P) TBC 1.8 GHz Dual-core Thunder TBC September 2020 watchOS 7.0
S7
Apple S7 module.png
October 2021 watchOS 8.0
Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache GPU Memory technology Modem First Released Utilizing devices Initial OS Terminal OS

T series

The T series chip operates as a secure enclave on Intel-based MacBook and iMac computers released from 2016 onwards. The chip processes and encrypts biometric information (Touch ID) and acts as a gatekeeper to the microphone and FaceTime HD camera, protecting them from hacking. The chip runs bridgeOS, a purported variant of watchOS.[190] The functions of the T series processor were built into the M series CPUs, thus ending the need for the T series.

Apple T1

The Apple T1 chip is an ARMv7 SoC (derived from the processor in the Apple Watch's S2) that drives the System Management Controller (SMC) and Touch ID sensor of the 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro with Touch Bar.[191]

Apple T2

Main article: Apple T2

The Apple T2 security chip is a SoC first released in the iMac Pro 2017. It is a 64-bit ARMv8 chip (a variant of the A10, or T8010), and runs bridgeOS 2.0.[192][193] It provides a secure enclave for encrypted keys, enables users to lock down the computer's boot process, handles system functions like the camera and audio control, and handles on-the-fly encryption and decryption for the solid-state drive.[194][195][196] T2 also delivers "enhanced imaging processing" for the iMac Pro's FaceTime HD camera.[197][198]

List of processors

Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache GPU Memory technology First Released Utilizing devices
Memory bandwidth
T1 APL
1023
[199]
Apple T1 Processor
ARMv7 TBD November
12, 2016
T2 APL
1027
[200]
Apple T2 Processor
TSMC 16 nm FinFET.[201] 104 mm2[201] ARMv8-A
ARMv7-A
2× Hurricane
2× Zephyr
+ Cortex-A7
L1i: 64 KB
L1d: 64 KB
L2: 3 MB[201]
3× cores[201] LP-DDR4[201] December
14, 2017
Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache GPU Memory bandwidth First Released Utilizing devices
Memory technology

U series

The Apple "U" series is a family of systems in a package (SiP) implementing ultra-wideband radio.

Apple U1

The Apple U1 is used in the iPhone 11 and later (excluding the second and third generation iPhone SE), the Apple Watch Series 6 and Series 7, the HomePod mini and AirTag trackers.[202]

List of processors

Name Model no. Image CPU Semiconductor technology First Released Utilizing devices
U1 TMK

A75
[203]

Apple U1 chip
Cortex-M4
ARMv7E-M
[204]
16 nm FinFET
(TSMC 16FF)
September
20, 2019
Name Model no. Image CPU Semiconductor technology First Released Utilizing devices

W series

The Apple "W" series is a family of SoCs and wireless chips with a focus on Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. "W" in model numbers stands for wireless.

Apple W1

The Apple W1 is a SoC used in the 2016 AirPods and select Beats headphones.[205][206] It maintains a Bluetooth[207] Class 1 connection with a computer device and decodes the audio stream that is sent to it.[208]

Apple W2

The Apple W2, used in the Apple Watch Series 3, is integrated into the Apple S3 SiP. Apple said the chip makes Wi-Fi 85% faster and allows Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to use half the power of the W1 implementation.[167]

Apple W3

The Apple W3 is used in the Apple Watch Series 4,[209] Series 5,[210] Series 6,[176] SE,[176] and Series 7. It is integrated into the Apple S4, S5, S6 and S7 SiPs. It supports Bluetooth 5.0.

List of processors

Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache Memory technology Bluetooth First Released Utilizing devices
Memory bandwidth
W1 343S00130[211]
343S00131[211]
Apple W1 chip
TBC 14.3
 mm2
[211]
TBC 4.2 December
13, 2016
  • AirPods (1st generation)
  • Beats Flex
  • Beats Solo3
  • Beats Studio3
  • BeatsX
  • Powerbeats3
W2 338S00348[212]
Apple W2 chip
TBC September
22, 2017
W3 338S00464[213]
Apple W3 chip
5.0 September
21, 2018
Name Model no. Image Semiconductor technology Die size CPU ISA CPU CPU cache Memory bandwidth Bluetooth First Released Utilizing devices
Memory technology

Miscellaneous devices

This segment is about Apple-designed processors that are not easily sorted into another section.

Early series

Apple first used SoCs in early versions of the iPhone and iPod Touch. They combine in one package a single ARM-based processing core (CPU), a graphics processing unit (GPU), and other electronics necessary for mobile computing.

The APL0098 (also 8900B[214] or S5L8900) is a package on package (PoP) system on a chip (SoC) that was introduced on June 29, 2007, at the launch of the original iPhone. It includes a 412 MHz single-core ARM11 CPU and a PowerVR MBX Lite GPU. It was manufactured by Samsung on a 90 nm process.[13] The iPhone 3G and the first-generation iPod Touch also use it.[215]

The APL0278[216] (also S5L8720) is a PoP SoC introduced on September 9, 2008, at the launch of the second-generation iPod Touch. It includes a 533 MHz single-core ARM11 CPU and a PowerVR MBX Lite GPU. It was manufactured by Samsung on a 65 nm process.[13][215]

The APL0298 (also S5L8920) is a PoP SoC introduced on June 8, 2009, at the launch of the iPhone 3GS. It includes a 600 MHz single-core Cortex-A8 CPU and a PowerVR SGX535 GPU. It was manufactured by Samsung on a 65 nm process.[102]

The APL2298 (also S5L8922) is a 45 nm die shrunk version of the iPhone 3GS SoC[13] and was introduced on September 9, 2009, at the launch of the third-generation iPod Touch.

Other

The 339S0196 is an ARM-based microcontroller used in Apple's Lightning Digital AV Adapter, a Lightning-to-HDMI adapter. This is a miniature computer with 256 MB RAM, running an XNU kernel loaded from the connected iOS device, then taking a serial signal from the iOS device translating that into a proper HDMI signal.[217][218]

Model no. Image First released CPU ISA Specs Application Utilizing devices Operating system
339S0196
339S0196 microcontroller
September 2012 Unknown

ARM

256 MB
RAM
Lightning to
HDMI conversion
Apple Digital
AV Adapter
XNU
Model no. Image First released CPU ISA Specs Application Utilizing devices Operating system

See also

Similar platforms

Notes

  1. ^ Could be referred to as "A1" though it is not labelled as such
  2. ^ iPhone (1st generation) and iPod touch (1st generation)
  3. ^ iPhone 3G and iPod touch (2nd generaiton)
  4. ^ Could be referred to as "A2" though it is not labelled as such
  5. ^ Sometimes referred to as "A3" though it is not labelled as such
  6. ^ iPad (1st generation)
  7. ^ iPod touch (5th generation), iPad 2 (Wi-Fi), iPad (3rd generation, Wi-Fi), iPad mini (1st generation, Wi-Fi)
  8. ^ iPhone 4S, iPad 2 (Wi-Fi + Cellular), iPad (3rd generation, Wi-Fi + Cellular), iPad mini (1st generation, Wi-Fi + Cellular)
  9. ^ iPhone 5C and iPad (4th generation, Wi-Fi)
  10. ^ iPhone 5 and iPad (4th generation, Wi-Fi + Cellular)
  11. ^ iPad Pro 12.9-inch (5th generation) with 1 TB and 2 TB storage, iPad Pro 11-inch (3rd generation) with 1 TB and 2 TB storage, online configured MacBook Air (M1) and online configured MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1)
  12. ^ Except iPad Air (5th generation)
  13. ^ Except iPad Air (5th generation)
  14. ^ Except iPad Air (5th generation) which only contains 1 USB-C
  15. ^ Online configured MacBook Pro 14-inch (2021) and online configured MacBook Pro 16-inch (2021)
  16. ^ Online configured MacBook Pro 14-inch (2021), online configured MacBook Pro 16-inch (2021) and online configured Mac Studio
  17. ^ Online configured Mac Studio
  18. ^ Online configured MacBook Air (M2) and online configured MacBook Pro 13-inch (M2)
  19. ^ Online configured MacBook Air (M2) and online configured MacBook Pro 13-inch (M2)

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Further reading