Political Work Department of the Central Military Commission
中央军委政治工作部
China Emblem PLA.svg
Agency overview
Preceding
  • People's Liberation Army General Political Department
TypeFunctional department of the Central Military Commission
JurisdictionPeople's Liberation Army
HeadquartersMinistry of National Defense compound ("August 1st Building"), Beijing
Agency executive
Parent departmentCentral Military Commission

The Political Work Department of the Central Military Commission (Chinese: 中央军委政治工作部) is the chief political organ under the Central Military Commission. It was created in January 2016 following the 2015 People's Republic of China military reform. Its predecessor was the People's Liberation Army General Political Department.

The department leads all political and cultural activities in the People's Liberation Army.[1] Its current director is Admiral Miao Hua; its deputy directors are Hou Hehua and Yu Guang.[2]

The Political Work Department's Liaison Department controls a united front organization called the China Association for International Friendly Contact (CAIFC) that is active in overseas intelligence gathering and influence operations.[3][4][5][6]

History

In November 2015 the General Political Department of the Central Military Commission was abolished and was replaced with the Political Work Department as part of Chairman Xi Jinping's military reforms.[7][8] Its role is to integrate the CCP and its ideology and propaganda into the People's Liberation Army. In January 2016, the Political Work Department became official.

Structure

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2021) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The following Bureaus are Subordinate to the Political Work Department:

Attached agencies and units

References

  1. ^ Mattis, Peter (2018-01-30). "China's 'Three Warfares' in Perspective". War on the Rocks. Archived from the original on 2019-10-26. Retrieved 2019-10-26.
  2. ^ Li, Nan (February 26, 2018). "Party Congress Reshuffle Strengthens Xi's Hold on Central Military Commission". Jamestown Foundation. Archived from the original on October 26, 2019. Retrieved 2019-10-26.
  3. ^ Hsiao, Russell (June 26, 2019). "A Preliminary Survey of CCP Influence Operations in Japan". Jamestown Foundation. Archived from the original on December 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019-11-30.
  4. ^ Stokes, Mark; Hsiao, Russell (October 14, 2013). "The People's Liberation Army General Political Department: Political Warfare with Chinese Characteristics". Project 2049 Institute. Archived from the original on December 29, 2019. Retrieved 2019-11-30.
  5. ^ Diamond, Larry, ed. (2019). China's Influence and American Interests : Promoting Constructive Vigilance. Chicago: Hoover Institution Press. ISBN 978-0-8179-2288-7. OCLC 1107586465.
  6. ^ Joske, Alex (June 9, 2020). "The party speaks for you: Foreign interference and the Chinese Communist Party's united front system". Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on June 9, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  7. ^ Kosaka, Tetsuro (January 28, 2016). "China's military reorganization could be a force for destabilization". The Nikkei. Archived from the original on October 26, 2019. Retrieved October 25, 2019.
  8. ^ Wen, Philip; Kang Lim, Benjamin (2017-09-08). "Sweeping change in China's military points to more firepower for Xi". Reuters. Archived from the original on 2019-10-26. Retrieved 2019-10-26.

See also