The State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs (SAFEA; Chinese: 国家外国专家局; pinyin: Guójiā Wàiguó Zhuānjiā Jú) was an agency of the government of the People's Republic of China (PRC) that operated under the State Council and the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security. It was responsible for recruiting foreign experts outside of mainland China - including Taiwan and the special administrative regions - for work in the PRC, and managing the training of Chinese nationals outside of the PRC.[1] It was headquartered in Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing.[2]

SAFEA founded in 1956[3] and abolished in March 2018, when its functions were absorbed by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). The SAFEA name was retained to interact with foreign parties.[1]

Recruitment

The fields targeted for foreign recruitment included the economy, technology, management, education, engineering, science, culture, and healthcare. Foreigners usually worked in foreign invested joint-ventures, private industry, state-owned enterprises and public construction projects.[4]

Programs and organizations supervised

Administration

The agency is organized according to the following structure:

Departments

Partnerships

SAFEA maintains partnerships with universities and professional bodies in several countries, including:

Controversy

According to the 1999 Cox Report, SAFEA's CAIEP is "one of several organizations set up by the PRC for illicit technology transfer through contacts with Western scientists and engineers."[14] In March 2022, a federal jury convicted a man of fraudulently obtaining U.S. visas for CAIEP employees.[15]

A 2019 report by the United States Senate Homeland Security Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations stated that SAFEA's contracts with foreign experts "include provisions that violate U.S. standards of research integrity, place TTP members in compromising legal and ethical positions, and undermine fundamental U.S. scientific norms of transparency, reciprocity, and integrity."[16]

SAFEA has been the subject of espionage investigations. In 2010, Noshir Gowadia was convicted for selling classified information, primarily regarding the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, to a SAFEA official.[17] SAFEA has been reported to operate nominally private front organizations such as Virginia-based Triway Enterprises.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "2017 Budget of the Former State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs". Ministry of Science and Technology. Translated by Etcetera Language Group, Inc. 20 July 2018. Archived from the original on 28 January 2021. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  2. ^ Home Archived 2009-01-19 at the Wayback Machine. State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs. Retrieved on July 12, 2017. "邮编:100873 地址:北京中关村南大街一号5号楼 "
  3. ^ a b "China's science ministry gets power to attract more foreign scientists". www.natureindex.com. 23 March 2018. Archived from the original on 2020-07-21. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  4. ^ "Notice Of The Office Of The State Administration Of Foreign Experts Affairs And The Consular Department Of The Ministry Of Foreign Affairs On The Use And Administration Of The Permit For Foreign Experts Working In China". Asianlii.org. Archived from the original on 2016-03-28. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  5. ^ Hvistendahl, Mara (2014-10-24). "Show me the money". Science. 346 (6208): 411–415. Bibcode:2014Sci...346..411H. doi:10.1126/science.346.6208.411. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 25342782.
  6. ^ "China International Talent Exchange Foundation". China Daily. Archived from the original on November 19, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  7. ^ Hannas, Wm. C.; Chang, Huey-meei (2019-09-25). "China's Access to Foreign AI Technology" (PDF). Center for Security and Emerging Technology. p. 11. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-07-31. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  8. ^ a b "Chinese Government Employee Charged in Manhattan Federal Court with Participating in Conspiracy to Fraudulently Obtain U.S. Visas". U.S. Department of Justice. 2019-09-16. Archived from the original on 2019-10-15. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  9. ^ a b c Hannas, William C.; Mulvenon, James; Puglisi, Anna B. (2013-06-14). Chinese Industrial Espionage: Technology Acquisition and Military Modernisation. Routledge. pp. 95–110. ISBN 978-1-135-95261-7. OCLC 1081421916.
  10. ^ Legerwood, Racqueal (2020-01-27). "As US Universities Close Confucius Institutes, What's Next?". Human Rights Watch. Archived from the original on 2020-08-17. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  11. ^ "Program Areas & Expertise | Global Maryland, University of Maryland". globalmaryland.umd.edu. Archived from the original on 2019-12-21. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  12. ^ "State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs". International Projects Office. Archived from the original on 2020-08-20. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  13. ^ "PMI Extends Cooperation Agreement with SAFEA for Five Years". www.prnewswire.com. June 27, 2018. Archived from the original on 2018-06-27. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  14. ^ U. S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China (PDF). August 1999. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-7881-8207-5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-10-07. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  15. ^ "Chinese Government Employee Convicted of Participating in Conspiracy to Defraud the United States and Fraudulently Obtain U.S. Visas". U.S. Department of Justice. 2022-03-23. Archived from the original on 2022-03-24. Retrieved 2022-03-24.
  16. ^ "Threats to the U.S. Research Enterprise: China's Talent Recruitment Plans". Homeland Security Digital Library. United States Senate Homeland Security Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations: 27. 2019-11-18. Archived from the original on 2020-08-20. Retrieved 2020-08-09.
  17. ^ Joske, Alex (August 20, 2020). "Hunting the Phoenix: The Chinese Communist Party's global search for technology and talent". Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on 2020-08-20. Retrieved 2020-08-20.