Takenoko gohan (筍御飯), one of the takikomi gohan (炊き込み御飯).
Takenoko gohan (筍御飯), one of the takikomi gohan (炊き込み御飯).

Takikomi gohan (炊き込みご飯, 炊き込み御飯) is a Japanese rice dish seasoned with dashi and soy sauce along with mushrooms, vegetables, meat, or fish. The ingredients of takikomi gohan are cooked with the rice; in a similar preparation, maze gohan (混ぜ御飯), flavorful ingredients are mixed into cooked rice.[1] In the Kansai region, takikomi gohan is called kayaku gohan, and in Okinawa, it is called Jucy.[2] This dish is consumed by people in Japan around the fall season since many root vegetables and mushrooms are harvested during this season in Japan.[3] Ingredients will vary based on the seasonal vegetables and fish. Since this dish contains nutritional value, and uses a small amount of rice with vegetables and proteins, some Japanese people eat it for dieting purposes.[4] One of the reasons why this dish is popular in Japan is because it is easy to make and does not require a lot of equipment to prepare.

History

Takikomi gohan was created during the Nara period.[5] During this period, Japanese people had a hard time harvesting rice to meet their demands. Thus, they mixed rice with millet to increase the amount of portions. It is called Awameshi. At the same time, people created an early form of takikomi gohan called Katemeshi. They mixed rice with millet and a variety of vegetables including weeds, yam and Japanese radish in order to survive a shortage of rice. This dish was a survival meal during World War II. During the Muromachi period, Katemeshi became popular in Japan, thus Japanese people made a similar dish called Kawarimeshi. Kawarimeshi uses the same ideas as Katemeshi to create the dish. However, the difference between them is that Kawarimeshi uses quality ingredients such as barley, beans, and vegetables. Over time people became creative and made a variety of dishes that were based on Kawarimeshi, and they used seasonal ingredients to maximize the umami taste in the dish.

Difference from maze gohan

The usual process to make takikomi gohan is to add all the ingredients such as rice, broth, soy sauce, vegetables and a protein source into a rice maker at once, on the other hand, maze gohan mixes ingredients such as vegetables and a protein source with cooked rice.[6]

Variations

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Tsuji, Shizuo. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. Kodansha International. 2006, p. 276.
  2. ^ Aniwotawiki. (2020, October 29). 炊き込みご飯 - アニヲタWiki(仮)【10/29更新】. Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://w.atwiki.jp/aniwotawiki/pages/4126.html
  3. ^ 9月に美味しい旬の野菜. (n.d.). Retrieved November 05, 2020, from https://foodslink.jp/syokuzaihyakka/syun/monthly/septembre-ve.htm
  4. ^ Watanabe, A. (2020, October 05). 炊き込みご飯のカロリー・糖質は?白米よりダイエット向きな理由は?. Retrieved November 05, 2020, from https://chisou-media.jp/posts/598
  5. ^ K. (n.d.). Okome to gohan no zakugaku. Retrieved October 15, 2020, from http://www.ne.jp/asahi/kiichiro/hp/info_p5.html Published by Shokuryou agency, Zenkoku beikoku kyoukai
  6. ^ 基本の五目炊き込みご飯のレシピ/作り方:白ごはん.com. (n.d.). Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://www.sirogohan.com/recipe/kayakugohan/
  7. ^ Tsuji, Shizuo. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. Kodansha International. 2006, p. 277.
  8. ^ Tsuji, Shizuo. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. Kodansha International. 2006, p. 278.
  9. ^ Tsuji, Shizuo. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. Kodansha International. 2006, p. 278.
  10. ^ Kamameshi, Tororomeshi. (n.d.). Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://www.asahibeer.co.jp/area/04/shitamachi/vol01.html
  11. ^ Aniwotawiki. (2020, October 29). 炊き込みご飯 - アニヲタWiki(仮)【10/29更新】. Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://w.atwiki.jp/aniwotawiki/pages/4126.html

References