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Tulumba
Tulumba.jpg
Tulumba
Alternative namesbalah ash-sham (Arabic: بلح الشام‎)
TypeDessert
Place of originOttoman Empire
Region or stateCountries of the former Ottoman Empire, Balkans, Middle East, South Caucasus
Main ingredientsFlour, butter, salt, water, syrup, vanilla extract

Tulumba or Bamiyeh (Persian: بامیه) is a deep-fried dessert found in Turkey and the regional cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire. It is a fried batter soaked in syrup, similar to jalebis and churros. It is made from unleavened dough lump (about 3 cm long) given a small ovoid shape with ridges along it using a pastry bag or cookie press with a suitable end piece. It is first deep-fried to golden colour and then sugar-sweet syrup is poured over it when still hot. It is eaten cold.

Name

Tulumba literally means 'pump' in Turkish from Italian: tromba. The dessert is called pomba in Cypriot Greek and bombacık in Cypriot Turkish. In Armenian cuisine it may be called either pomp or tulumba (Armenian: թուլումբա). Tulumba features in Albanian, Serbian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Greek (Greek: τουλούμπα), Azeri (Azerbaijani: Ballıbadı) and Turkish cuisines. The sweet is also found in Persian cuisine as bamiyeh (Persian: باميه), after the vegetable of the same Persian name (okra), due to its shape. In Hejazi it is called ṭurumba (Arabic: طُرُمْبَة) directly from Italian: tromba, but in Egyptian and some Arab cuisines it is called balaḥ ash-Shām (Arabic: بلح الشام), literally "Syrian dates" or "Damascene dates," though the name may have come from "şambali", another Turkish dessert (the "Şam" in "şambali" corresponding to "Shām" in "balaḥ ash-Shām" and both referring to Damascus). In Iraqi cuisine it is known as datli (Arabic: داطلي), directly coming from Turkish word tatlı.

Main ingredients

It is made from a yogurt[citation needed] and starch based dough, which is fried before being dipped in syrup. It is a special sweet often enjoyed at Iftar in Ramadan.[1] It is also commonly served with its counterpart, the jalebi, which is prepared the same way, but the only difference is that it has a web-like arrangement consisting of strips of dough.

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ "Muslims break fast on first day of Ramadan". USA Today. Associated Press. November 4, 2005. Retrieved August 19, 2010.